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The Wisdom of Food Storage

July 10, 2013 | 3 comment(s)

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America is the land of plenty; a place of security and shelter for its citizens. Would we ever really need to use food storage here? This is a thought-provoking question. Research has shown that the average American household has less than a week’s supply of food on hand. This is also the case with the average American supermarket. Without being paranoid or panicked, there are many valid reasons to put extra food away. We are all somewhat vulnerable to events beyond our control. But most situations are probably closer to home: loss of power, unexpected or unplanned interruptions of life such as unemployment, loss of income due to illness or injury, or high medical bills due to an accident. Food storage is a form of insurance protecting your family from the unexpected.

A Wise Investment

Food storage becomes a wise investment in future stability and an even wiser investment if you practice storing what you use and using what you store. Making food storage a life-style rather than a make-do will help you maintain your investment. Food storage that matches your family’s lifestyle is food that more likely will be used. Using and rotating your Freeze Dried Foods and Dehydrated Foods on a regular basis maintains the original investment and prevents it from being wasted.

The Basics

It is recommended to always start your food storage program by storing the basics. Grains, legumes, dry milk, sugar, salt, oil, and garden seeds have come to be known as the "basics." Do not underestimate the power these foods have, as they have been shown throughout history to sustain life. It is important to know how to prepare and use the basics, especially ways that your family will enjoy. If you are familiar with the food you have stored, you will be better prepared to use it during times of emergency.

Beside the Year Supply of Basics, we offer various year supply units. These year supply units vary from just over 1100 calories per day to 1800 calories per day. If a person has a year supply of wheat on hand it would be an additional 1374 calories per day. If a person had a complete year supply of basics it would add 2000 calories a day more. It is easy to see the value of storing basics and the variety of fruits, vegetables, and mixes as found in our prepackaged year supply units.

Confidence and Security

Having your food storage can help you have a greater degree of confidence and security. It is important to do your best to prepare your family to be able to eat no matter what happens to the national economy or your job in particular. This confidence in times of crisis can be a most precious commodity. An adequate food supply for your family is a major part of economic security, and possibly the key to survival.

Self-Reliance and Interdependence

Food storage helps you become self-reliant as in the case of the first three days of an emergency or providing for your family when you lose your employment. It also helps you to be interdependent with others as you share during a crisis. Communities weather storms best when they share and work together. With food storage you are better prepared to endure times of adversity without becoming dependent upon the government. Your family’s way of life may be preserved with proper preparation. Self-reliance is often contingent upon a willingness to work. Work can become a source of happiness, and self-esteem, as well as prosperity. Storing, using and knowing how to produce and prepare food and other items that are essential for life create security and stability for you and your family. If a disaster does occur, and you were forced to temporarily change your normal life style, you could do so with minimum discomfort.

Relief Organizations

Some people are apathetic about preparedness, often because they aren’t sure what to do or where to begin. They may become overwhelmed at the prospect of a crisis and the responsibility of self-reliance and become discouraged before they begin. Others are frustrated by contradictory advice, not sure whose ideas to follow. Still others do nothing, figuring that if trouble comes, an emergency disaster organization will rush to their rescue. A common misconception that can be refuted is that the government will immediately come to the rescue. Federal and state organizations perform marvelous service, but when a large population is relying solely upon them, it is virtually impossible to provide for specific or individual needs of everyone. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) advises, "If a disaster threatens your community, local government and disaster-relief organizations will try to help you. But you need to be prepared as well. Local officials may be overwhelmed after a major disaster, and emergency response personnel may not be able to reach you right away. What you do to prepare can make a difference."

Most local relief organizations will take approximately three days (72 hours) to get back on their feet to be able to help you. An emergency kit is a big step in the right direction. Doing your part by having food, water, and supplies for three days will help alleviate the pressure on relief agencies as well as minimize your own discomfort.

Preparedness is everyone's job. Not just government agencies, but all sectors of society--service providers, businesses, civic and volunteer groups, industry associations and neighborhood associations, as well as every individual citizen--should plan ahead for disasters.

Being prepared for the unexpected is wise. It provides confidence knowing your family is better prepared to be safe and secure. Families who are prepared can reduce fear, inconvenience, and losses that surround a family crisis or a natural disaster.

This post was posted in Food Storage, Insight

3 thoughts on “The Wisdom of Food Storage”

  • Phyllis Taylor
    Phyllis Taylor March 18, 2014 at 3:27 pm

    Although I like the advice, I am buying long term storage items to use in case of an emergency...mostly the ones which last 25 years...I don't really want to feel I have to rotate those and use them on a regular basis. Aren't they still going to be okay if I don't?

    Reply
    • beprepared

      Hi Phyllis,
      It is true that your food will still be ok even after 25 years. But we suggest rotating your food and using it regularly so that you and your family can get used to it. For instance, imagine being in an emergency and you start eating only freeze-dried or dehydrated foods even though you haven't eaten them before. What happens when our bodies are introduced to new foods? They need time to adjust. So imagine dealing with the stress of an emergency, but on top of that, having to deal with stomach illness as well because your body isn't used to eating only that type of food. This is why we suggest using your food and rotating it. Also, even though your food will be good for 25 years, the flavor of that food may not be as strong as if you used it earlier and rotated it. Rotating helps to give peace of mind and maintains the flavor of the food.

      Reply
  • james

    wish everyone would listen to common sense and get prepared for what lies ahead. The problem is, fools stick their heads in the sand and wait for everyone else to look out for them.

    Reply

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