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Sleep When the Wind Blows

July 12, 2013

 

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A farmer needed an extra hand to help on his farm. One young man came to interview for the job. "What are your qualifications?" the farmer asked. "I can sleep when the wind blows," the young man said. This simple reply confused the farmer, but he was desperate for help and the young man was hired.

The young man was a diligent worker through the harvest season, but the farmer still questioned his answer.

Autumn ended and the first cold storm of winter came late one night. The farmer panicked as the winds began to blow. Calling the young man for help, the farmer grabbed his coat and pulled heavy boots on his feet. He was disappointed to find the young man asleep in bed at a time like this. Grudgingly he ventured out alone planning to shuffle all of the animals in the barn and then fix that last hole in the roof. He mumbled about the young man sleeping and was sure all the farm equipment was left standing in the field, collecting rust from the snow.

However, when the farmer reached the barn all the animals were tucked safely inside. In fact, clean hay had already been set out for the new day. Not a single hole could be found in the roof, and the tractor was parked perfectly in the shed.

"Who could have done it?" the farmer wondered. And then, he realized what the young man's answer meant, "I can sleep when the wind blows."

Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge and U.S. Fire Administrator
David Paulison published the following:

"WHAT SHOULD YOU DO?"

"Have on hand three days’ worth of water and food, an emergency kit for both home and automobile, radios with extra batteries..."

"Make a plan for contacting family members in an emergency. . ." (CNN, February 11, 2003)

We are also instructed by FEMA and other preparedness organizations to prepare for 72 hours (or three days). Why three days? In most crisis situations, much of the real suffering occurs immediately following the disaster. Generally, it takes three days for disaster relief agencies to assist those in need. That is why it is recommended to have at least a 72 hour or emergency kit. Your emergency kit should meet the needs of your family.

A good resource to help your family prepare is the Family Preparedness Plan DVD.

By preparing yourself and your family for an emergency, you can feel confident that you are better able to handle the unexpected. Just like this young farmhand, you too can sleep when the wind blows.


This post was posted in Insight, Planning

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