Tag Archives: water storage

  • Portland Issues a City-Wide Boil Order

    On Friday, May 23, the Portland, Oregon Water Bureau issued a city-wide boil order after E. coli was detected in the water. According to ABC News, this 24-hour boil order was the largest in the city’s history, affecting 670,000 people in the city and several outlying suburbs.

    Coffee shops, restaurants, and bars were forced to close during this period, impacting their weekend sales. But grocery stores saw a spike in sales as people purchased water jugs, bottled water, and soda cans in excess.

    Although the boil order ended on Saturday, May 24th, the city still hasn’t figured out the source of the contamination. But it’s assumed that an animal spread fecal matter through the city’s water system. The city drained and cleaned two reservoirs, but is telling residents to continue to take caution and to run their taps for two minutes to eliminate any contaminated water.

    Even though the boil order only lasted a day, drinking contaminated water can have serious effects and can cause illness. One way to prepare for a boil order and to avoid depleting grocery shelves is to store water and to have a water filter like the Katadyn Hiker and a method of water purification like Micropur tablets on hand that can remove or kill bacteria and protozoa in the water.

     

    To learn more about the Portland boil order, check out these articles:

    “Portland Issues Boil Order . . .” from the Oregonian

    “Looking Back on Portland’s largest Boil Order Alert . . .” from the Oregonian

    “Portland lifts City-Wide Boil Order” from ABC News

     

    To learn more about water storage, and filtration and purification, check out these articles:

    Water Restrictions Making you Blue?

    Discover the Best Water Treatment System for You

     

    What are your tips for surviving a boil order? 

    --Angela

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: water storage, water purification, water filter

  • The Rain Barrel: SoCal's Hot New Accessory

    If California’s (no) water situation seems to be taking up a lot of our attention, it’s because certain circumstances, while unfortunate, provide us opportunities to talk about good preparedness practices that may otherwise slip off our radar.

    Here’s a pretty cool example. In response to record low precipitation levels, some Southern California cities have implemented what they’re calling “no-brainer, low-hanging fruit solution[s]” for water independence—policies and projects geared to reclaiming and recycling local water.

    An ABC News story from earlier this month describes the rainwater collection system that waters the Santa Monica city library’s extensive gardens, as well as the water recycling plant near the famous pier that supplies irrigation to several local parks and schools.

    And individuals are catching on. The same article calls resident Josephine Miller’s 205 gallon rain barrel “fashionable,” as neighborhoods dive in to take advantage of local government rebates for home water conservation. While your city hall may not pay you for your efforts, rainwater storage makes efficient use of one of the few free resources at our disposal. Just make sure it’s legal to do so in your city or state, first.

    So, if you’re interested in harnessing some May showers for yourself, here are a handful of tips, tutorials, and helpful products.

    • Heard worrisome things about using roof-collected rainwater on edible plants? Educate yourself on the real and not-so-real risks, courtesy Rutgers’ cooperative extension.

     

    Here’s wishing you a happy and drippy spring!

    --Stacey

    Photo Courtesy of Better Homes and Gardens

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: water storage, drought

  • Imagine this…

    You’ve been storing water over the past few years, sealed safe and sound in the 55-Gallon Water Storage Barrel, but an emergency just turned the world upside down. There’s barely any water left in the state, let alone your city, and what is available is contaminated. Luckily, your family has prepared for this moment. You’ve stored enough clean drinking water to help you outlast this emergency…But how do you get the water out of your storage barrel?

    In an emergency, people resort to all types of ways to get to their clean water (such as tipping the barrel on its side). But there’s no need for that. Not when you can easily do it with the siphon hose and keep your barrel free from contamination. With the siphon hose it’s as easy as one, two, and three. All you need is a bung opener, the hose, and a bucket.

    1.  Get yourself a siphon hose, if you don’t already have one.

    Storing water is fairly useless if you can’t get the water back out of the barrel to use in an emergency. A siphon hose gives you an easy, efficient way to remove water from large containers, whether you need it to drink or you need to empty the barrel so you can clean it out and replace your water.

    In addition to the siphon hose, try adding the Garden Hose Adaptor to your supply. This adapter allows you to connect your siphon hose to your garden hose for additional length when siphoning your water. This adaptor can also be used to extend your garden hose if you need the extra length for other projects.

    How to use a Siphon Hose

    2. Position the bucket and stick the siphon hose in the water

    Place a bucket on a lower surface level than the container you are siphoning your water from so the hose will slope downward. Next, notice the difference between the two ends of your siphon hose. One end is bare, exposing the plastic tube that the water will travel through. The other end has a copper head piece on it—this piece allows for flow control and induces the siphon action. Stick the bare, exposed end of the tube into your empty bucket. Place the siphon end into your water barrel.

    How to use a siphon hose

    3.  Shake it up and down

    Keeping the siphon end fully submerged in the water, begin moving it in a quick, vertical, up-down motion. You’ll begin to see water entering the tube (unable to flow back out through the siphon), making its way out of the barrel and into your empty bucket. After a few seconds, when the water is flowing on its own, you can stop shaking the hose and the water will continue to flow from your barrel into your bucket.

    If you struggle a bit getting the water into the hose to start siphoning, make sure your vertical shaking is done with quick, jerky movements. If the water stops siphoning when you let go of the hose, just shake it in the vertical, up-down motion for a little bit longer.

    4. To stop the flow, remove the copper valve from the water

    Once you have enough water, simply remove the copper valve from the water to stop the flow.

    You can siphon about 2 gallons of water per minute with this hose, making it a great way to quickly remove water from large containers. The siphon hose can also siphon gasoline, oil, diesel, and other fuels, solvents, and chemicals safely. But it doesn’t only siphon—it can remove water from clogged sinks, aquariums, water tanks, and more! The siphon hose is great for a variety of liquid removal needs.

    Note: If you use your siphon for drinking water, use a separate siphon hose for gasoline and other chemicals—and be sure each one is clearly labeled.

     

    Still confused? Check out this video of how to use the siphon hose:

     

    --Kim

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: water storage

  • Your Drought-Year Garden

    If you’re like me, a sunny afternoon in March finds you tearing through your Territorial seed catalogue and poring over cryptic drawings of garden plots. It’s like I can hear my backyard’s biological clock ticking and I can’t wait another minute to get outside!

    As part of your preparations for your 2014 garden, you’re probably checking out seed calendars and companion planting charts. Here’s one more graphic you might want to consider from the U.S. Drought Monitor:

    How will your garden do in your area during this drought?

    Experts are calling the current western dry spell one of the “worst droughts in 500 years”, severely affecting the supply of drinking water, as well as that for crop irrigation. In fact, one of the most far-reaching effects of even a localized drought in an agricultural state like California is rising produce prices across the country (read about food storage and drought here).

    In that light, gardening may seem like a smart way to beat the heat. However, if you live in any of the highlighted areas on the map above, there are some serious considerations for the home gardener. Some Californians have already been required to restrict water use. Your neighborhood may not be in quite such dire straights, but there are ways all of us can garden a little more conservatively in a dry year.

    Check out these tips and tricks for gardening in lean times:

    Water conservation is a good idea any time, but this year seems to be providing us a compelling reason to conserve. Read about California’s challenges and some solutions you can implement at home and in the garden. Then get outside and get those peas in the ground!

    Sources:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/02/us/severe-drought-has-us-west-fearing-worst.html

    Photo Courtesy of U.S. Drought Monitor

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: food storage, preparedness, water, Emergency, Survival, water storage, garden, gardening, emergency preparedness, drought, produce

  • How's Your Water?

    |1 COMMENT(S)

    Oil and gas drilling are blamed for the pollution behind problems with drinking water

    When we think about water storage, what we usually have in mind is a power outage that disrupts our utilities or a natural disaster that might contaminate a water source. Not to add to our worries, but the Associated Press (AP) recently published one more good reason—and a sneaky, unexpected one—to store clean drinking water.

    In the wake of the recent boom in the energy industry, several states are reporting problems with well water. They blame oil or gas drilling for the pollution. Details are still coming (read about the AP’s investigation here), but drinking straight from the tap is looking less and less appealing in certain parts of Pennsylvania, Texas, Ohio, and West Virginia.

    Whether your water comes from a local well or a city reservoir, it’s smart to prepare against the possibility of contamination. Read up on filtration and purification techniques and check out how to Find the Right Water Filtration System for you, so even in the event of a problem at the source, you’re never without drinkable water.

    One of the big lessons of emergency preparation is that emergencies don’t always come in the form of sirens and a flashing red light. In fact, the best reason to be prepared is the problem we don’t see coming.

    Preparation through education is less costly than learning through tragedy.”

                                                       --Max Mayfield, Director of National Hurricane Center

    --Stacey

    Photo Courtesy of Yahoo! News

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: preparedness, water, Survival, water storage, emergency preparedness, pollution

  •  The Long, Hot Winter: The California Drought

    While the Northeast and Midwest shiver through one of the coldest and snowiest winters in recent history, other parts of the country would trade their palm trees and avocados for just a little rainfall. Earlier this month, California’s governor declared an official drought emergency. Ten other states have also been labeled as “disaster sites” by Federal Agriculture officials.

    Parts of Arkansas, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Kansas, New Mexico, Nevada, Oklahoma, Texas, and Utah are all facing historically low water levels. The lakes and reservoirs losing water in these states have led to decreased water supplies in the West. This prolonged dry spell has even contributed to several wildfires.

    According to NBC news, Governor Brown believes this is the worst drought California has seen in 100 years. He’s asking Californians to cut their water usage by 20 percent.

    Since everyday services (like gas and electricity) are not affected by droughts, it can be hard to think of a drought as an emergency situation. However, it still doesn’t hurt to be prepared. Having a ready supply of home water storage will help you during a drought. See our water storage products  for more great options to beat a drought or another emergency.

    For helpful tips on how to save water in a drought, check out Fema.gov’s  list of water conservation tips. Also, this “Water—Use it Wisely” infographic illustrates 100+ ways to conserve water you may have never considered before.

    Learn how to conserve water by taking our “Water Challenge: One Gallon of Water for One Day.” You’ll be surprised at how much water you use in a typical day, especially when you only have one gallon for your cooking, drinking, and sanitation needs. Use this challenge to determine how much water to store for your family’s home water storage. Most people find that they want the "luxury" of a few additional gallons per day.

     

    --Stacey and Angela

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: water, water storage, drought

  • Building your water storage today will give you clean drinking water tomorrow

    We often take for granted that with just the flip of a handle clean drinking water is dispensed straight into most homes. But how many of us actually know what is coming through the tap?

    A chemical spill polluted water supplies in West Virginia on Thursday. Schools and restaurants closed, grocery stores sold out of bottled water, and thousands had to go without drinking, bathing, cooking, or washing their clothes with municipal water.

    According to Tom Aluise, a state Department of Environmental Protection spokesman, the tank that leaked holds at least 40,000 gallons, but they’re “confident that no more than 5,000 gallons escaped.”

    Although not lethal, the chemical in question is harmful if swallowed or inhaled, according to a fact sheet from Fisher Scientific. It can cause eye and skin irritation, along with other symptoms.

    To read more about the chemical spill, check out the article here.

    Even if you don’t live near one of the nine affected counties in West Virginia, it’s important to prepare against the chance of water pollution. When you’re prepared, an emergency can seem less like a crisis to you and your family.

    Having a water storage supply and a means to filter and purify your water are useful during a variety of emergencies. In cases such as this, however, typical microfilters and purifiers won’t be able to cleanse the water from the chemicals. But the Hydropack will.

    The Hydropack has .05 micron (5 angstrom) sized holes for water to pass through when dropped into a water source. The spilled chemical (4-methylcyclohexane methanol) is larger than 5 angstroms; the cyclohexane molecule itself is 5.3 angstroms. That means the chemical molecules are too large to pass through the Hydropack’s forward-osmosis filtration membrane.

    Simply drop the Hydropack into your water source and let it absorb the water, filtering out chemicals and other contaminants to create an electrolyte drink much like a sports drink.

    Although the Hydropack can help in a situation like this, storing clean water is important so that you can rely on yourself in times of emergency without having to wait for a filter or relief groups to get set up. There could also be situations when the pollutant in the water is small enough that the Hydropack won’t solve the issue.

    Start building your water storage supply today so you have clean drinking water tomorrow. These articles have great tips to get you started:

    Water Storage Overview

    5 Myths about Water Storage

    Water, Water, Everywhere: The Importance of Water Storage

    Water Storage Options

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: Survival, water storage, emergency preparedness, chemical spill, west virginia

  • This year, along with the traditional New Year’s resolutions like losing weight, eating less treats, or being more financially savvy, consider making some Emergency Preparedness Resolutions for 2014.

    Each Monday in January, we’re sharing our Preparedness New Year’s resolutions. If you’d like to make some Prepping Resolutions of your own, but don’t know where to start, borrow some of ours or use this series to get some ideas.

    This week we’re talking about Food/Water. Here is what our Emergency Essentials’ bloggers are doing to prepare in 2014.

    New Year’s Resolution Prepper Style: Food/Water

     

     Prepper Style New Year's Resolutions

     

    Sharon

    Since I have lots of basics such as beans, wheat, rice, pasta, and milk, and a few just-add-water entrées, I resolve to concentrate on fruits, vegetables, and meats. I know if I have a supply of such items as sausage crumbles, ground beef and chicken, I can combine them with other ingredients to make lots of different meals. The freeze-dried fruits I’ve tried have been absolutely delicious, both as snacks right out of the can and rehydrated, so I know I’ll want plenty of those. My favorites so far are the Blueberries, Peach Slices, and Cinnamon Apple Slices. Yumm!

    Realizing that our water supply is pretty old, I resolve to change it out this year and be sure it’s fresh and usable. I plan to get a new siphon hose and bung opener to help with this task.

    Sarah

    My food storage is getting a bit of extra attention this year. I’ve got a smattering of random food storage items I’ve picked up over the years, so this month I’m going to sit down, enter what I’ve got into the Food Storage Analyzer, and determine what I need. I know I’m missing a lot of the basics like wheat, honey, and powdered milk, and I really want to have a food supply that’s nutritionally balanced and that includes food I love. So I’ll be taking a good look at my Food Storage Analyzer results and watching for sales on the items that will fill in the caloric and nutritional gaps I’ve got in my supply.

    As far as water goes, I’m focusing more on storage and purification than filtration this year. I’ve already got a Katadyn Vario microfilter that I love, so my basic filtration needs are met. I also have a 160-gallon Water Reserve… that’s totally empty. So this month I’m pulling out the hose (even though it’s COLD outside) and filling up my Reserve. I’m also grabbing a few packets of MicroPur tablets so I have something available that will kill any microorganisms in the water sources I come across (since many viruses are too small for microfilters to catch).

    Angela

    Um, my resolution is to actually get and store a supply of food and water . . . My husband and I have a couple of cans stored, but I realize those few cans won’t last us for long. I’ve been thinking about what type of cook I would be in an emergency and have decided that I would be an MRE/Mountain House Pouch kind of girl—just add water or just eat straight out the pack. So for my New Year’s resolution, I’d like to gather and store more MREs and Mountain House pouches, but I’d also like to get a couple of #10 cans to make food for special occasions (and for when we get tired of the MREs) during an emergency.

    I’d also like to get a water filter like the Katadyn Hiker to take on camping and hiking trips during the summer.

    Kim

    This year, my family is going to build out our food storage, which, as of now, is no where near where it should be. We want to add #10 cans and MyChoice cans of our favorite meals to our emergency supply and begin incorporating them into our menu. The first few food storage items I want to add to my pantry are Mountain House Sweet and Sour Pork with Rice , Mountain House Diced Chicken , Provident Pantry Fettuccine Alfredo with Chicken, and Yoders Bacon.

    We will also be adding a 15 gallon water barrel to our pantry to help us store water in case of an emergency where we are unable to access clean water. Along with the barrel, we’ll add a siphon hose—I mean, we have to have a way to get our water from the barrel to our table.

     

    What are you doing to get your food and water supply prepared in 2014? Let us know in the comments! 

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: food storage, water, water storage, emergency preparedness

  • 55-gallon water barrel combo

    The 55-Gallon Water Barrel Combo is a great option to give you peace of mind during an emergency or city/county-wide boil order. During the month of October, this combo is on sale for $81.99, a $124.85 value. This combo will allow you to have clean, usable water stored right in your home if your normal water supply is disrupted or contaminated.

    This combo includes:

    •  55-Gallon Water Barrel: The minimum recommended amount of water for an emergency situation is one gallon per day per person for two weeks. This includes water for drinking, minimal cooking, and simple hygiene needs (sponge bath and teeth brushing). This means the 55-gallon barrel will provide:

    -          1 gallon of water for one person for fifty-five days

    -          27.5 gallons  per person for two people (nearly a month’s supply)

    -          13.75 gallons per person for four people (about a two week supply)

     

    • 1 Emergency Siphon: Allows you to access your water quickly from your 55-gallon barrel.
    • 1 Barrel Buddies II Bung and Gas Wrench: This tool will help you to open the barrel bungs with ease, giving you easier access to your water and allowing you to siphon water out. This tool is great because it can also be used as a wrench to turn off your gas valve during an emergency.

    You'll definitely need these two tools to help you access the water stored in your 55-gallon barrel safely during an emergency. Our 55-Gallon Barrel Combo is a great value and an excellent way to get started storing water for shelter-in-place circumstances.

    Siphon water from larger containers into portable containers

    If you’re interested in getting a 55-Gallon Water Barrel Combo, but you’re a first time barrel buyer, there are a couple of things that you should know about how to safely store and retrieve your water. Here are 5 frequently asked questions that first-timers often ask:

     

    What are the barrels made of?

    The barrels are constructed of sturdy, food-grade, # 2 BPA-free polyethylene plastic.  Each barrel is dark blue, limiting light exposure that can encourage algae growth in your water.

     

    Where should I keep my barrel?

    If you have a basement, storing your barrel there would be ideal.  In the basement, your barrel would be protected from excess heat and light. But if you don’t have a basement, you can keep your barrel anywhere you have room for it—on a back porch, in a carport, laundry room, or mud room. However, we do not recommend keeping it in the garage near engine fumes and where products such as fuels, oils, and paints are stored.

    Even though thick plastic seems impermeable, it is actually porous and will eventually absorb any chemical odors in the environment. These odors could  then leach into your water making its taste unpleasant.

    We also caution against placing your barrel directly on a concrete floor. We recommend placing planks or a sturdy wooden pallet under the barrel before filling. This provides a breathable barrier to help prevent mold and mildew growth. Once it’s filled, it’s not going anywhere--the water itself will weigh 440 lbs.! If you keep your barrel outdoors, you might want to get a [Barrel Bag] to slip over it to reduce accidental contamination from soil, bird droppings, and dust.

     

    What in the world is a bung?

    Bungs are the two white plugs on top of the barrel that allow you to fill your barrel and access your water. They are nearly impossible to remove without the proper tool. That’s why the 55-gallon combo comes with a bung wrench to help you open your barrel without breaking the bungs.

     

    Do I need anything else?

    Additional tools available include the Siphon Hose Adapter, which allows you to attach your siphon hose to a regular garden hose—useful for filling your barrel or emptying it to your yard, garden, bathtub, or wherever you choose. We also offer a [Drinking Water Safe Hose] in 25 and 50-foot lengths, which would be helpful in filling your barrel from your kitchen or bathroom water source, and the Bung Seal Cap, which fits over the bung opening and helps prevent contamination. You might also want a jug for transporting water from your barrel into your kitchen or bathroom. For this purpose, we offer a Standard Five-Gallon Jug made of #2 food-grade plastic, with a separately sold spigot, and both a 5-Gallon and 2.5-Gallon Collapsible Jug that  come with spigots. You’ll also need Aquamira Water Treatment that can keep a water barrel free from “bugs” for 5+ years.

     

    How long will my water last stored in a barrel?

    Water, unlike food, doesn’t spoil or “go bad” with time. However, we recommend rotating your water once a year or using Aquamira Water Treatment to make sure that your water is absolutely fresh when it comes time to use it.

    If it was clean when you put it into a clean barrel, and hasn’t been contaminated since, it will last indefinitely. If it tastes “flat,” just pour it back and forth between containers to aerate it before drinking. If you notice any strange odor to your water, however, you can of course change it out or treat it with a purifying agent. (See our blog post on water filtration and purification.)

     

     

    One of the easiest ways to begin or increase your water storage reserves is to purchase a water barrel combo to help you with your water storage maintenance. The 55-gallon combo is a great introduction to water storage for beginners, but it is also perfect for those who have water storage experience, making it easier to store and retrieve your water. For more information on water storage, filtration, and treatment visit these links:

     

    Water Storage Insight Articles

    Water-related Blog Posts

    “Water” Search results on Beprepared.com

     

     

     

     

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: water, water storage, water barrel, water barrel combo

  • September Sale Items

    |2 COMMENT(S)

    Our September sale items will bring you remarkable savings this month. After looking through the September catalog for great deals, I found 8 sale items that would help you cover the essentials for emergency preparedness—light, food storage, shelter, water, and emergency and first aid kits.

    Light

    Charger Hand Crank Flashlight-on sale for $5.89 (50% off this month!). This flashlight has 3 LEDs and 2 brightness modes. One minute of hand cranking charges the internal NiMH battery for up to 30 minutes of light. Can charge basic cell phones (excludes most smart phones). The perfect addition to your emergency kit.

    CL-L330 EEI Red Charger Light copy

    Food Storage

    Supreme Pizza Combo-on sale for $99.99 (31% off this month!). This combo includes all the ingredients you need to make a supreme pizza—sausage, onions, peppers, mozzarella, dough mix, and sauce. This versatile combo comes in four Provident Pantry®#10 cans and four MyChoice™ cans. You can use the ingredients in other recipes as well.

    SPECIAL SALE- All Mountain House #10 cans—on sale for 40-50% off this month!

    For the whole month of September, we are having our best sale EVER on our Mountain House #10 cans. If you love Mountain House products, now is the time to stock up and get incredible savings on your favorite items like chili mac, raspberry crumble, and granola with blueberries and milk. Check out all the great Mountain House Deals for September.

    Mountain House Chili Macaroni at the dinner table

     

    Shelter

    Deluxe Portable Privacy Shelter-NEW item! On sale for $69.99 (22% off this month!) This portable pop-up shelter is perfect for camping, pool parties, and outdoor events. It’s the perfect size for one person to sit or stand comfortably while changing, showering, or for sanitation needs. Provides cool features like a detachable tarp floor, towel hanger, and toiletry pockets for the ultimate privacy and convenience.

    CH-S110 Portable Privacy Shelter copy

    Water

    SteriPen Emergency Handheld Water Purifier-On sale for $36.99 (26% off this month!). Use UV light to destroy waterborne microbes that could make you sick. Eliminates 99.9% of bacteria, viruses, and protozoa in water. Treats one liter in 90 seconds, and ½ liter in 48 seconds. Perfect for backpacking and hiking to purify water found on or off the trail.

    WP-P525

    Emergency Kit

    Roadwise Emergency Kit-on sale for $32.99 (originally $38.95). This car emergency kit can serve as a second emergency kit if you evacuate your home during an emergency. Kit includes hand warmers, poncho, water boxes, toilet paper, a multi-tool, headlamp, and 400 calorie bars, and much more! It’s the essential “bug-out-bag.”

    KC-A600 Roadwise Kit

    First Aid Kit

    Medic’s (192 piece) First Aid Kit-on sale for $69.99. (originally $79.95). Includes 175 medical items traditionally used by paramedics and emergency medical technicians. Comes with EMT shears, fine point tweezers, and a Wilderness and Travel Medicine Guide. The perfect item for a comprehensive emergency kit.

    KF-M100

     

    We’ve got some incredible deals this month, so don’t miss out! Remember to check out our Mountain House #10 can sales—with 40-50% savings, items are bound to go fast. Happy Prepping!

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: monthly sales, emergency kit, sale, water storage, #10 cans, September sale

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