Tag Archives: drought

  • Your Drought-Year Garden

    If you’re like me, a sunny afternoon in March finds you tearing through your Territorial seed catalogue and poring over cryptic drawings of garden plots. It’s like I can hear my backyard’s biological clock ticking and I can’t wait another minute to get outside!

    As part of your preparations for your 2014 garden, you’re probably checking out seed calendars and companion planting charts. Here’s one more graphic you might want to consider from the U.S. Drought Monitor:

    How will your garden do in your area during this drought?

    Experts are calling the current western dry spell one of the “worst droughts in 500 years”, severely affecting the supply of drinking water, as well as that for crop irrigation. In fact, one of the most far-reaching effects of even a localized drought in an agricultural state like California is rising produce prices across the country (read about food storage and drought here).

    In that light, gardening may seem like a smart way to beat the heat. However, if you live in any of the highlighted areas on the map above, there are some serious considerations for the home gardener. Some Californians have already been required to restrict water use. Your neighborhood may not be in quite such dire straights, but there are ways all of us can garden a little more conservatively in a dry year.

    Check out these tips and tricks for gardening in lean times:

    Water conservation is a good idea any time, but this year seems to be providing us a compelling reason to conserve. Read about California’s challenges and some solutions you can implement at home and in the garden. Then get outside and get those peas in the ground!

    Sources:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/02/us/severe-drought-has-us-west-fearing-worst.html

    Photo Courtesy of U.S. Drought Monitor

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: food storage, preparedness, water, Emergency, Survival, water storage, garden, gardening, emergency preparedness, drought, produce

  •  The Long, Hot Winter: The California Drought

    While the Northeast and Midwest shiver through one of the coldest and snowiest winters in recent history, other parts of the country would trade their palm trees and avocados for just a little rainfall. Earlier this month, California’s governor declared an official drought emergency. Ten other states have also been labeled as “disaster sites” by Federal Agriculture officials.

    Parts of Arkansas, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Kansas, New Mexico, Nevada, Oklahoma, Texas, and Utah are all facing historically low water levels. The lakes and reservoirs losing water in these states have led to decreased water supplies in the West. This prolonged dry spell has even contributed to several wildfires.

    According to NBC news, Governor Brown believes this is the worst drought California has seen in 100 years. He’s asking Californians to cut their water usage by 20 percent.

    Since everyday services (like gas and electricity) are not affected by droughts, it can be hard to think of a drought as an emergency situation. However, it still doesn’t hurt to be prepared. Having a ready supply of home water storage will help you during a drought. See our water storage products  for more great options to beat a drought or another emergency.

    For helpful tips on how to save water in a drought, check out Fema.gov’s  list of water conservation tips. Also, this “Water—Use it Wisely” infographic illustrates 100+ ways to conserve water you may have never considered before.

    Learn how to conserve water by taking our “Water Challenge: One Gallon of Water for One Day.” You’ll be surprised at how much water you use in a typical day, especially when you only have one gallon for your cooking, drinking, and sanitation needs. Use this challenge to determine how much water to store for your family’s home water storage. Most people find that they want the "luxury" of a few additional gallons per day.

     

    --Stacey and Angela

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: water, water storage, drought

  • Drought conditions help spread wildfires across California

    Wildfires swept through Central and Coastal California earlier this week and the severe drought conditions aren’t helping this prolonged fire season.

    CBS News reported fires engulfing buildings, burning homes, climbing mountainsides, and forcing evacuations across the state.

    "The lack of rain and the unseasonably dry conditions . . . make fire conditions just as bad as in the middle of fire season," said Scott Bahrenfuss of the Rio Vista Fire Department.

    On Kimball Island, what began as a 10-foot brush fire sparked into a 40-acre wildfire as intense wind speeds picked up. In Southern California, a 2-acre fire damaged two homes, two mobile homes, three motor homes, 40 vehicles, and roughly a dozen structures.

    Other areas left fire fighters scrambling to fight off the flames encroaching on some homes, while others were left to burn. As the fires spread, many residents were forced to abandon their homes, including the 15 people on Kimball Island.

    Check out CBS News’ newscast:

    With the extremely arid conditions in California, people should be extra careful with how they use fire. Simple actions such as flicking a cigarette butt out a car window or lighting a small campfire could start a rapid wildfire the sparks hit dry grass.

    To read more about the fires in Southern California, check out the following articles:

    What would you do if you were caught in a wildfire? Would you be prepared to bug out right away?

    Check out the articles below to make sure you’re prepared:

    Make and Practice a Fire Escape Plan

    Fire Season Safety and Preparedness Tips

     

    Video courtesy of CBS News

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: preparedness, Survival, emergency preparedness, natural disaster, fire, California Wildfire, drought