Monthly Archives: December 2013

  • New Year's Eve: Stay Safe and Have Fun

    Stay safe this New Year's during all of your festivities

    As the New Year rolls in, start it off right by staying safe during your New Year’s Eve festivities.

    Whether you plan to celebrate at home, around town, or in Times Square, make sure you prep for any emergency that might happen while you’re out ringing in the New Year.

    Keep Your Phone Charged

    Take a cell phone and charger with you to your parties and events. Cell phones (what most already consider to be their lifelines) become even more vital at big events, especially if you are celebrating in an unfamiliar area. The Switch 8  will help you charge it even if you don’t have your regular charger handy. Communication is important so that you can reach your friends, family, or loved ones in case you get lost, injured, or have another emergency.

    Keep Cash Handy

    Have cash on hand if you’re going to be out all night. You never know when a craving for tacos or pie might hit you. More serious than a craving, however, would be to have enough cash to take a taxi home or to use in another emergency.

    Be Safe on the Road

    Watch out for drunk drivers on the road. And remember to also do your part in keeping the celebration fun without making it dangerous for yourself or others.

    Be Careful with Fireworks

    Be aware of the potential danger that fireworks pose. They are a fantastic way to celebrate 2014, but the fun and games end when someone gets hurt. Double check that fireworks are legal in your area before lighting them. Watch for flying sparks or children standing too close to active fireworks.  However, even with all the preparation in the world, accidents can still happen, so keep some BurnFree on hand, just in case. It never hurts to prepare.

    These are just a few tips to keep you safe as you celebrate the end of 2013. For more safety tips, check out the links below.

    http://www.abc15.com/dpp/news/region_southeast_valley/mesa/fireworks-safety-tips-for-new-years-eve

    http://wheels.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/12/31/jan-1-is-worst-day-for-drunken-driving-analysis-shows/

     

    We hope you have a safe and fun New Year’s Eve this year!

    Kim

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: New Year, celebrate, holiday, emergency preparedness, Emergency plan, preparedness, safety

  • Stacey's Double Apple Crisp

    At our house, Christmas celebrations revolve around traditional treats that different family members have been perfecting for decades. My mom’s pie crust is legendary. My dad’s truffles, fudge, toffee, and peanut brittle are requested annually. In recent years, we’ve added my husband’s mouth-watering peppermint-chocolate-chocolate-chip cookies and a friend’s grandmother’s recipe for old English boiled cranberry pudding We do manage a dinner in there somewhere, but if I’m honest, our holiday is basically a sweet fest.

    My job is baking. The breads, the cookies, the cobblers all fall to me, which suits me just fine (me, who couldn’t find my way around a candy thermometer if my life depended on it!). The only problem is that from mid-November onward, I end up having to make semi-weekly pilgrimages to the grocery store just to stay stocked up on eggs, butter, and brown sugar—not to mention the fresh fruit and cream that I only ever need in miniscule portions and which spoil after five minutes in my fridge. But this year, I found a secret weapon!

    Are you ready?

    I don’t think you’re ready.

    Okay, fine. It’s egg powder. Seriously, I have a pumpkin bread recipe that calls for six eggs. Do you know how fast I go through those huge cartons? But already this month I’ve made pumpkin bread, sugar cookies, and two batches of gingerbread, and I haven’t even made a dent in my can of egg powder. I love it! And it makes me think I should be raiding my food storage for other basics, and maybe even the not-so-basics.

    In that spirit, I want to share with you one of my favorite seasonal treats. I found this fantastic apple crisp recipe years ago and have been tinkering with it every winter until it’s become, quite simply, the best thing ever. And it can be made almost entirely out of food storage items! Good to know you could still have luxuries like apple crisp, even in the midst of a crisis. Bon appétit!

     A Dish Of Apple Crisp made from Food Storage

    Stacey’s Double Apple Crisp

    1 ½ cups Provident Pantry White Flour

    2 cups Provident Pantry Regular Rolled Oats

    2-3 tsp MyChoice Premium Cinnamon

    1 tsp ground nutmeg

    1 tsp ground cloves

    1 ½ cups packed Provident Pantry Brown Sugar 

    1 ½ cups (3 sticks, or 24 tbsp) reconstituted Provident Pantry Butter Powder

    6-8 cups reconstituted Provident Pantry Freeze-Dried Cinnamon Apple Slices

     

    1.      Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C)

    2.      Combine flour, oats, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, and brown sugar. Cut in butter until mixture is crumbly (this works best with fingers!)

    3.      Put half the mixture into a 9x13 baking dish and pat down.

    4.      Cover crumb mixture with reconstituted apple slices, then sprinkle apples with remaining crumb mixture.

    5.      Bake for 45-50 minutes. Serve hot. Top with ice cream.

    Um…I might need to go make this right now.

    --Stacey

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: christmas, Dessert, family, recipe, holidays, food storage

  • Last Chance December Sale Items

    There are just two days left in the year 2013! So you know what that means, right? There are just two days left to check out our December sale items, too. Now that the holiday season is dying down, you can sit back, relax, and look through our December sale items as you ring in the New Year.

    In case you didn’t get a chance to check out our sale items during the hustle and bustle of the last few weeks, here are some items selling at great prices this December!

    Trekker II-Emergency Kit (two person)-- On sale this month for $87.99 (a $147.59 value). This Emergency kit includes basic survival gear for two people to survive for up to three days. The best part is that buying extras of this kit will prepare you for a variety of events that may arise in 2014: birthdays, as a gift for your nephew’s wedding, or for your cousin who has two kids and is trying to get the family prepared. Each kit comes with a medium and a large backpack and includes hygiene items, water, calorie food bars, warmth items, first aid necessities, a Tube Tent, radio, and so much more!

    Trekker II Emergency Kit (two person)

     72-Hour Food and Water Supply— Each combo includes meals-ready-to-eat and water for one person for three days. This combo has a variety of MRE entrees, sides, and desserts to choose from, as well as 18 water pouches, and much more! You can mix and match to create unique meals. You can even use this combo to add more food to your pre-made Trekker II kit or the emergency kit you already own. It’s on sale this month for $52.99 (at $90.50 value).

    72-Hour Food and Water Supply

    Shredded Hash Brown Potatoes—Hash browns are a special treat to have for a weekend or holiday breakfast. After partying on New Year’s Eve, why not wake up on New Year’s Day to the delicious smell of hash brown potatoes cooking in the skillet? Better yet, you can eat these hash browns as a side dish or create a breakfast casserole; there’s just so much you can do with one can of hash browns!  Get them this month for only $7.89 (20% off the regular price of $10.99).

    Shredded Hash Brown Potatoes

    Steripen Ultra— As you start preparing for the upcoming spring/summer camping season, make sure you have a water purifier on hand as you hike on the trails. The Steripen Ultra is a rechargeable, ultra-violet water purifier that can purify up to 50 liters of water per charge! This pen can neutralize over 99.9% of viruses, bacteria, and protozoa in your water. On sale this month for $79.99 (regularly priced at $119.95).

    Steripen Ultra

    As you celebrate the New Year, don’t forget to check out our December sales. All of these items will help you to be prepared not only for 2014, but for many years to come!

    Happy New Year!

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: December sale, sales, sale, monthly sales

  • Tips for Preventing Holiday Fires in Your Home

    Prevent holiday fires in your home

    Inevitably at this time of year, we see headlines about holiday fires as this season of celebration involves heavy traffic, excessive electricity use, and extreme weather. The latest disaster comes from my corner of the country, where a dog alerted a family to a Christmas tree fire that claimed $85,000 worth of damage to their home.

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology reports that Christmas tree fires are relatively rare (right around 210 per year), but that fatalities associated with those fires are disproportionately high. In other words, the chance of a tree fire in your home may be low, but if it happens, you have a greater chance of dying. Yikes. And if you really want to give yourself a scare, watch the video on their site showing a dry Christmas tree catching fire and consuming a whole room in less than a minute.

     

    Live trees aren’t the only culprits. Pre-lit artificial trees, candles, and home baking all increase the chance of a home fire during the holidays, so be particularly careful this year.

    Both FEMA and the National Fire Prevention Association provide helpful tip lists for avoiding holiday fires in your home. You can also check out our blog post to Make a Fire Escape Plan and download this pdf on home fire safety.

     

    The only thing we want burning this season is the Yule log!

     

    --Stacey

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: fire, Fire Safety, tips, preparedness, holidays

  • Happy Holidays!

    Happy Holidays!

    Merry Christmas! We hope you have a wonderful time celebrating with family, friends, and loved ones this holiday season!

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: christmas, holiday

  • Early Tornado Warning Saved Lives

    Tornado Warning in the Midwest saves countless lives

    At any time, a natural disaster can strike without any warning. Preparation for any type of emergency, but especially for a natural disaster, can and will pay off in the event one comes to your town.

    Mother Nature reached out with her fickle hand once again in November, spreading tornadoes across the Midwest.

    Dozens of tornadoes traversed through seven of the states—and Illinois was hit the hardest. Although most of the destruction happened in Washington, IL, only one fatality resulted in the area. And why is that?  Preparation.

    For days, various weather service centers watched the weather and charted the rising storm, allowing them to predict when the tornado would arrive in Washington. On the day of the storm, local weather service centers broadcasted a warning 16 minutes before the tornado hit. This warning was broadcasted three minutes earlier than any other tornado warning Illinois has had in the past. Those three extra minutes saved countless lives as people fled to safety.

    “You are in a life-threatening situation,” said the last warning. “Complete destruction possible. Flying debris will be deadly.”

    To learn more about the Midwest tornadoes and Washington’s victory over fatalities, check out CBS News

    You may never face a tornado (and we hope that’s the case!), but check out this article to prep yourself in case one ever does cross your path.

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: Midwest Tornados, Tornado, natural disaster, emergency preparedness, Survival

  • Favorite Holiday Meal

    Favorite Holiday Meal

    My husband’s siblings live in our general area, so on Christmas afternoon our family tradition takes us all to my brother’s home for a pot-luck holiday meal. His family, with a few dollars contributed by each of us, provides a ham and a turkey. The rest of us bring the trimmings—rolls, salads, relish plates, potatoes, vegetables, and desserts. These can vary from year to year, but here are some favorites:

    Sour Cream Party Potatoes—(known locally as “Funeral Potatoes” because they’re so often included at after-funeral luncheons!): Shredded cooked potatoes  baked with Cream of Chicken Soup, sour cream, green onions (optional) and grated cheese, topped with a crunchy layer of crushed cereal or potato chips. (See recipe below)

    Cranberry Orange Relish: chopped fresh cranberries; ground orange with some peel, sugar, and nuts; mixed into a black cherry or raspberry gelatin base. It tastes like Christmas!

    Green Bean Casserole—the usual combination of green beans (fresh-cooked, frozen, canned, or reconstituted freeze dried) mixed with French’s Fried Onions and some Cream of Mushroom Soup. Some folks add cheese, others slivered almonds or mushrooms. A delicious variation is fresh-cooked asparagus bites with Cream of Asparagus Soup.

    Raisin Sauce for Ham—a slightly thickened sauce of ham drippings, pineapple juice, and brown sugar, with a few plumped raisins to spoon over sliced ham.

    Butter-browned Parsnips—parsnips peeled and cut like carrot sticks, boiled a few minutes until just tender, then lightly browned in a skillet with butter.

    Layered Salad—Bite-size lettuce bits layered with ranch dressing, frozen green peas (they’ll thaw), shredded Swiss cheese, crumbled crisp bacon, and chopped green onions. Chill in layered state and toss just before serving.

    Christmas Jello—red and green layers of gelatin (with fruits as desired), separated by a layer of cream cheese mixed with whipped topping (and a little pineapple if you like). Top with a dollop of whipped topping on each serving.

    Sweet Potatoes and Apples—alternate slices of each in a casserole dish, top with melted butter and brown sugar and bake until tender. Variations: sweet potatoes and pineapple dices, or broiled pineapple and apple slices.

    Chocolate Peppermint Dessert—using a recipe for cream-puffs, spread pastry on cookie sheet and bake until lightly browned and puffy. Spread generously with mixed instant chocolate pudding, then a layer of whipped topping, finished with finely-crushed peppermint candy. Cut into squares.

    And a few fondly-remembered dishes from my southern childhood:

    Macaroni and Cheese Casserole (and I’m not the only one—be sure to see Mac and Cheese: A Holiday Tradition--and by the way, don’t miss Apple Cinnamon French Toast—a Christmas Tradition—I’m trying that one this year!)

    Cornbread Stuffing for Turkey—Use the same seasonings as for bread-crumb stuffing: sage, thyme, onion, celery, and chicken or turkey broth--used to moisten crumbled cornbread instead of wheat bread crumbs. (See recipe below)

    Pecan Pie—whole pecans topping a rich filling made of dark Karo syrup and eggs

    Sweet Potato Pie—similar to pumpkin, but made with cooked, pureed sweet potatoes instead, making a slightly thicker texture.

    Recipe: “Sour Cream Party Potatoes” (the mostly-food-storage version)

    4 cups reconstituted Provident Pantry Hash Browns, drained

    1 tablespoon Provident Pantry Green Onions (or any of our Onions)

    1 ½ cups Provident Pantry Shredded Freeze-Dried Cheddar Cheese

    Sauce:

    Whisk together in a medium saucepan:

    3 ½ cups cold water

    1/2 cup Provident Pantry Cream Sauce and Soup Base mix

    1 tablespoon Provident Pantry Chicken Broth mix

    ½ cup Provident Pantry Sour Cream Powder

    Bring to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes.

    Fold drained potatoes into sauce. Add onions and cheese and stir well. Pour into a buttered casserole dish and top with crushed potato chips or crushed cereal such as crispy rice or corn flakes. Dot with Red Feather Butter. Bake at 350° F for ½ hour or until bubbly.

     

    Recipe: Cornbread Stuffing (the mostly-food-storage version)

    1 batch of Provident Pantry Corn Muffin Mix, prepared the day before if possible, cut in slices and allowed to dry out

    ½ cup Provident Pantry Chopped Onions, reconstituted

    ¾ cup Provident Pantry Celery, reconstituted

    1 ½ teaspoons sage

    1 teaspoon thyme

    1 teaspoon dried parsley

    ½ teaspoon Provident Pantry Black Pepper

    3 tablespoons Red Feather Butter or Clarified Butter

    About 2 cups Provident Pantry Chicken Broth, prepared

    In butter, sauté the onions and celery for a few minutes, then add seasonings. Add 1 cup of the chicken broth and let simmer for a couple of minutes. Crumble the dry cornbread into fine pieces and add to skillet, stirring to absorb the liquid. Add more chicken broth as needed to get the consistency you like. If you’re planning to stuff a turkey or a chicken, make your stuffing a little on the dry side, as it will absorb juices from the bird. Otherwise, spoon stuffing into a casserole dish and cover. Keep warm until it’s time to serve.

    There you have it—some of my favorite traditional holiday foods. Do you have a favorite holiday meal? Leave a comment and let us know!

    Happy holidays!
    --Sharon

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: traditions, holiday, #10 cans, freeze dried, recipes, food storage

  • 6 Winning Designs from INDEX's Survival Structure Contest

    Six Survival Structures to Help you in a Disaster

    Having a practical survival structure option is crucial in an emergency. This is why the Dutch non-profit organization INDEX recently held a structural design contest (structural design refers to the creation of buildings, homes, furniture, etc.) that asked contestants to create structures that could meet the growing global challenges that we face daily—one of these challenges being natural disasters.

    INDEX’s mission is to find the best designers who can create structures to improve the quality of life and to make daily tasks easier for all people. Each year, INDEX holds one of the largest design contests in the world.

    The CNN article, “In the Middle of a Natural Disaster? These Designs will Help You” highlights six survival structure from INDEX’s 2013 contest—designs that pay particular attention to helping people alleviate the impact of natural disasters in their lives.

    According to CNN, these projects “include a broad range of devices designed to save lives by helping rescue workers or giving people caught up in the aftermath of a natural disaster a way to help themselves.”

    The most interesting survival structure to me was the “Eliodomestico”. Its  structure is similar to a water well system, but it has a “futuristic” twist. The “Eliodomestico” gathers and distills sea water using the power of the sun to make it clean and safe to drink.

    Check out how the Eliodomestico works by watching this video.

    The other designs range from thin skyscrapers used as housing for victims of natural disasters to inflatable rafts that can be used as furniture. Take a look at the other five designs that CNN highlights by checking out their article, “In the Middle of a Natural Disaster? These Designs will Help You”.

    How useful/functional do you think these structures would be in a flood, tornado, or tsunami? Let us know in the comments.

    --Angela

    Image Source: http://www.nominateforindexaward.com/Presentation/read/id=MTc0MQ==

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: emergency preparedness, Survival, preparedness, shelter, skills, warmth

  • Natural Disasters and Gender: An Unexpected Factor

    Natural Disasters and Gender: An Unexpected Factor

    In 1970, the Bhola Cyclone hit Bangladesh, killing close to 300,000 people. Of every 15 victims, 14 were women. Since then, researchers have been looking into the cultural factors that affect genders differently in an emergency situation. In third world countries (historically hardest hit by natural disasters) for instance, social taboos might make it difficult for women to evacuate unescorted.

    While we may live in a community free from the same restrictions, other factors are less foreign, in the article, “Improving Women’s Odds in Disasters,” the World Bank reports that “most women in Bangladesh were home-based, and responsible for children and elders . . . They died in cyclones because they did not hear warnings, or because they had to fend for others as well as themselves.”

    The circumstances of these women are in some ways similar to what we may experience in the U.S. during an emergency. In a crisis, many women and men may put aside their own safety to lend a helping hand to a spouse, the elderly, children, neighbors, friends, and other loved ones. However, it is also important that in addition to helping others, we learn to help ourselves as well. Or in another circumstance, fathers or mothers who work to provide for their families and may not be home when an emergency strikes, thus it is important that all family members know how to be prepared. Our own preparedness education will allow us to not only help our loved ones, but will enable us to do so without jeopardizing our own health or safety.

    This is why for the last 40 years, Bangladesh has labored to involve women more in their emergency planning so that they can help themselves as well as others during an emergency. This increased effort has caused the gender gap in disaster casualties to dramatically decrease. One of the major lessons we can take away from emergency planning in Bangladesh is that no matter what our social, cultural, professional, or domestic circumstances may be, whole families (men, women, children, and the elderly) need to be educated about preparedness.

    Learn more about Bangladesh’s efforts to educate citizens about emergency preparedness in the World Bank.org article, “Improving Women’s Odds in Disasters.” Then check out the following articles and resources to get started on your own family’s emergency plan.

    --Stacey

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: natural disaster, emergency preparedness, Survival, family, Emergency plan

  • Emotional Aftershocks: Handling Feelings after a Disaster

    Traumatic events can cause emotional aftershocks

    Experiencing Emotional Aftershocks

    Just like aftershocks can follow an earthquake, traumatic stress reactions are like emotional “aftershocks” that we may experience following a personal, community, or national disaster. Symptoms may begin immediately, but could appear weeks, months, or (occasionally) years later. Most begin within three months of the triggering event.

    The sufferings of military men and women who come home from war with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) have taught us a lot about human response to intense stress and trauma. These folks often experience flashbacks, anxiety, depression, emotional numbing, trouble sleeping, hallucinations, exaggerated responses to loud noises, and much more. We see similar responses in victims of traumatic events like natural disasters, house fires, terrorist attacks, car accidents, and witnessing criminal acts, and because of increased understanding of PTSD, we can more easily recognize and address it.

    Understanding the Roots of Emotional Aftershocks

    The severity of our reaction to trauma is influenced by several factors:

    • The intensity and length of the traumatic event
    • Other stressful factors we’re already dealing with
    • The length of time since the event happened (usually the intensity of our reaction and feelings will decrease over time)
    • Long-term results of the event, such as the loss of loved ones or pets, long-term or permanent disabilities, the loss of housing and personal belongings, lasting psychological damage, etc.
    • Whether we have prior experience with the specific type of event (or something similar). This prior experience can be positive (and actually help us with our reaction) or it can be negative, making a difficult situation worse. For example, a person who is accustomed to frequent earthquakes may not be quite as terrified as a “first-timer” (positive). On the other hand, a person who has already been through a house fire may be even more terrified of a second event (negative).

    In order to overcome any negative responses we have to traumatic situations, we first have to recognize the response and be able to associate it with the traumatic event. After a traumatizing event (or before a predicted event), watch for the following stress responses in yourself and others.

    Traumatic Stress Responses:

    • Fear and anxiety may mount before a predicted or anticipated event as information becomes available through the media or authorities.
    • During the event, feelings such as panic, uncertainty, fight-or-flight response, and terror for the lives and safety of self and others may predominate.
    • Some people are amazingly able to stay calm and hold themselves together during the crisis, only to fall apart afterwards.
    • The severity of the situation may only hit home after the event, when the person begins to realize the extent of their loss—of loved ones or property—or faces the extreme frustration that occurs when they cannot find out what happened to either.
    • Later responses may appear in the forms of nightmares, flashbacks, hallucinations, generalized anxiety, restlessness, irritability, anger, sadness, periods of unexpected crying, self-destructive behavior (such as drinking too much), memory problems, difficulty maintaining close personal relationships, and fear of crowds, strangers, or being alone. Anger is frequently a secondary emotion, following closely on the heels of fear or frustration. People often experience guilt at having survived an event that took the lives of many around them.
    • Physical symptoms such as digestive disturbances, dizziness, exhaustion, pounding heart, trouble sleeping, or headaches are common.

    Coping with Your Own Emotional Aftershocks 

    • Get extra rest and relaxation, especially if you can’t sleep well 
    • Listen to relaxing music
    • Get some form of exercise
    • If you've experienced loss, attend or take part in funerals and memorials and allow yourself to grieve
    • Establish as normal a schedule as possible as soon as you can
    • Talk to friends about your feelings, as well as to counselors and/or religious leaders
    • Avoid alcohol and drugs (except medications prescribed by a doctor)
    • Don’t fight against recurring nightmares and flashbacks—these are one way our minds deal with trauma. The episodes should gradually decrease and become less painful. If, however, you find them increasing in intensity or length, or causing you to feel a lack of motivation, consult a professional.
    • If those around you are saying you need to get help, pay attention to them! There’s no virtue in being miserable or reluctant to accept help in these situations. Often we think we should be strong enough to “just deal” with what we've gone through, not realizing how deeply rooted and lasting the damage is.

    Helping with the Emotional Aftershocks of Others

    • Listen carefully, even if people repeat themselves and dwell on the same topics. Allow them to share their thoughts and feelings; avoid dismissing what they say, but rather hear them out and be there for them.
    • Spend time with them. You may need to seek them out, especially if they withdraw and “just want to be left alone.” On the other hand, do allow them some private time to grieve their losses. Don’t immediately try to cheer them up with what is normally a “fun” activity. After they've had time to grieve, however, a little normalcy may be just what they need.
    • Offer assistance if you see a need, even if they haven’t asked for help. Many people have a difficult time asking for help with everyday tasks, which can feel overwhelming when a person is traumatized. Child-care, housekeeping or home repairs, yard work, and help with transportation or shopping are good places to start.
    • Help them avoid alcohol and drugs (except medications prescribed by a doctor)
    • Recognize that people grieve in their own way and within their own timeframe. Never say, “Oh, for heaven’s sake! Aren’t you over that yet? Let it go.” They will when they can.
    • If the person exhibits anger or has emotional outbursts, try not to take it personally. He or she may very well have a reservoir of anger with no way to direct it at the cause of their pain.
    • If you see any signs or threats of suicidal or homicidal behavior, get the person professional help right away.

    Looking to the future

    • Make an updated family or personal emergency plan.
    • Replenish or establish a disaster supply kit for yourself and family members.
    • Act on the things you wish you had done before the traumatic event you experienced—build a shelter, fortify your home, obtain food and water storage, learn survival skills, get fire and carbon monoxide monitors, etc.

    Some things we experience in our lives can cause psychological pain as severe as the pain of traumatic physical injuries—and in many disaster situations, both types of pain are present. We need to give and accept help in these times, and support one another through our difficulties. Though in the wake of disasters there are some people who loot and take advantage of weakness, we see more in the ways of families, neighbors, and communities rallying to help each other through tough times, a heartwarming and encouraging reflection on the state of humanity. Helping ease the pain of emotional aftershocks is a vital part of the aid we can give—and receive.

    See also our Insight Article, “Preserving Sanity in a Disaster Situation”

    For immediate emotional help, call the Disaster Distress Hotline at 1-800-985-5990.

     

    Sources:

    www.fema.gov/coping-with-disaster

    www.webmd.com

    www.weather.com/safety/homesafety/emotional-health-20120601

    www.newsroom.redcross.org/2012/07/symptoms-and-support-after-disaster

    www.disasterdistress.samhsa.gov/disaster-distress-hotline

    www.mayoclinic.com/health/post-traumatic-stress-disorder

    Posted In: Insight, Planning, Skills Tagged With: Emotional Aftershocks, PTSD, emergency preparedness, Survival, family, Emergency plan, skills

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