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How to Plant Your Canned Garden Seeds

May 13, 2013

Basket of Garden Vegetables

By Mountain Valley Seeds

Premium Quality Non-Hybrid Seeds; enough to plant 3/4+ acres

These varieties have been recommended by Utah State University for short-season climates; with excellent adaptability for most regions. These 16 easy-to-grow, Non-Hybrid varieties have been especially selected for this application. Your unopened seeds should store for four years or more depending on storage temperature. These seeds have been carefully dried to their optimum moisture content to increase their storage life. The cooler the storage temperature, the longer the storage life of your seeds—they are ideal for emergency preparedness storage. The best place to store your seed would be in a cool, dry, dark location such as a basement. For best results store unopened can in a refrigerator or freezer.

THE 100% NONHYBRID LONG-TERM STORAGE SEEDS

Sweet Corn, Golden Bantam, 5 oz Spinach, Bloomsdale Longstanding, 10 gr
Pepper, Yolo Wonder, 5 gr Peas, Lincoln, 5 oz
Radish Champion, 10 gr Cabbage, Golden Acre, 10 gr
Winter Squash, Waltham Butternut, 10 gr Swiss Chard, Lucullus, 10 gr
Onion, Utah Yellow Sweet Spanish, 10 gr Lettuce, Romaine Paris Island Cos, 5 gr
Pole Bean, Kentucky Wonder Brown, 5 oz Cucumber, Straight Eight, 10 gr
Beet, Detroit Dark Red, 10 gr Carrot, Scarlet Nantes, 10 gr
Squash Zucchini, Black Beauty, 10 gr Tomato, Rutgers PS, 5 gr

 

The JUMBO SIZED seed packets give you more seed for your money and are uniquely heat sealed in a triple layered foil bag. Our seed packets allow you to reuse their bags by resealing the seeds with our unique E -Z Lock feature. You can replant the seeds of these non-hybrid varieties for future harvests.

GARDENING is the most popular leisure activity in the United States. A Brigham Young University study showed that for an average garden you would spend about $30.00 for seeds but harvest vegetables that would be worth more than $600.00 per year. Growing vegetables is not only for mental and physical health but it is also economical and teaches children responsibility.

GARDEN LOCATION is important. A sunny, well - drained location is essential. Rich, light loam with good texture is the best. Plant your tall and trellised plants on the north side so they will not shade the shorter plants. Food crops may be planted in parking strips, corners of lots, along fences, and surrounding patios. As little as 100 square feet (10' x 10' or 20' x 5') can be used to grow a lot of good eating.

SOIL MODIFICATION should be made by mixing 2 to 3 inches of organic matter to a depth of 6 inches to benefit most soils. This will help loosen heavy clay soils, add nutrients, and improve the water holding capacity of sandy soils. Use abundant, composted, inexpensive materials such as leaves, sawdust, wood shavings, or old hay. Some materials might contain weed seed. To avoid nitrogen deficiency and pale plants, add 1 pound (1 pint) of ammonium sulfate for each 1 inch of material per 100 square feet. If enough composted material or manure is available, reduce the ammonium sulfate rate by half. Peat Moss, perlite, or vermiculite can provide the loosening effects but are more expensive and have not nutritional content. To maintain this improved tilth and structure, add organic material each year.

Heirloom Garden Seeds (canned)

SOIL MOISTURE & PLANTING: The frequency of watering depends on the texture of your soil. In arid areas, watering the garden is more necessary. Clay soils require less frequent watering than sandy soils. Gardens in sandy soil would require shallower but more frequent applications of water. When seeds are first planted, it is important that the soil remains moist so that the seeds will germinate as soon as possible. Some seeds, like Corn, Tomato, Pepper, Squash, and Cucumbers, > NEED WARM SOILS before germination can take place. You should wait until the soil warms up before planting, usually two weeks after the average date of the last frost in your area. You might consider starting these seeds in small containers for transplanting. After the seed has germinated and the plant is established, the frequency and depth of watering will increase as the weather gets warmer. Since sandy soils do not store much water, it is suggested that you add organic matter to increase water holding capacity and water more often. Several vegetables including Onions, Spinach, Peas, Cabbage, Radishes, and Swiss Chard MAY BE PLANTED VERY EARLY IN THE SPRING. Many of the early, cool season crops may be planted again in July 10-15 to extend the garden season until well after the first frost.

HARDY GROUP:

Peas, Radish, Onions, Cabbage, Spinach

Plant as soon as the soil is dry enough to work, or when apple buds start to swell, or about March 15 to May 15

Click here to view a comprehensive table of planting specs

PEA - Lincoln is a very popular garden variety. This pea has a fine sweet flavor when picked young, & excellent quality when frozen, canned, or used fresh. 60 days. Pods are 3 inches with 5 or 6 peas. Compact 18-20 inch plant does not require staking. Fine sweet flavor when picked young.

Planting: Plant very early in the spring in a sunny location as soon as the ground may be cultivated & enriched with organic material. Press soil firmly over the seeds; best when planted in blocks or rows grouped together. For an extended harvest period plant at 2 week intervals until mid-spring & in late summer for a fall crop. Tolerates cold & light frost well.

RADISH - Champion is an AAS Winner and recommended by Utah State University. This easy to grow vegetable is bright cherry red with a very firm globe - shaped root. Radishes make a good companion crop. It can be planted again in late summer for a second crop. Radish is eaten plain or used as a garnish for salads.

Planting: Plant very early in the spring in a sunny location as soon as the ground may be cultivated and enriched with organic material. For an extended harvest period, plant at two week intervals avoiding hot summer temperatures. Press soil firmly over seeds.

ONION - Utah Yellow Sweet Spanish is a popular and versatile vegetable. These seeds produce large onion bulbs sometimes weighing a pound or more, especially well suited to the Western States. This sweet and mild flavored Utah Yellow Sweet Spanish onion has fair storage characteristics with moderate Pink Root tolerance. Utah Yellow Sweet Spanish Onions may be eaten raw, cooked, or used for seasoning any meal.

Planting: Plant your Utah Yellow Sweet Spanish Onion very early in the spring in a sunny location as soon as the ground may be cultivated and enriched with organic material. Press soil firmly over seeds.

SPINACH - Bloomsdale Long Standing is a delicious and nutritious easy to grow green leaf plant that is recommended by Utah State University. This slow to bolt variety has heavy, glossy, crumpled, dark green leaves. Spinach is delicious cooked, an ingredient in many recipes, steamed, served with butter and lemon juice or fresh in salads.

Planting: Plant very early in the spring in a sunny location as soon as the ground may be cultivated and enriched with organic material. Press soil firmly over seeds. Sow seeds sparingly and repeat every two weeks as long as the weather is cool (Spring/Fall)

CABBAGE - Golden Acre thrives in cool weather and is easy to grow. This hardy vegetable is delicious eaten raw, cooked, or prepared as sauerkraut and canned. This cabbage is a slow bolting, vigorous, early variety that is recommended by Utah State University. The cabbage head has a mild flavor and measures about 5 to 6 inches in size when mature.

Planting: Five or six weeks before last frost start seeds indoors using potting soil mixture. Harden plants for seven days before planting by setting them outdoors during the day. Cabbage plants like sunny locations. Do not plant in same place as previous year to minimize diseases. Firm soil over the seeds and keep moist.

 

SEMI-HARDY GROUP:

Swiss Chard, Beet, Carrot, Lettuce

Plant a week or two after “A” group or when apple buds are in a tight cluster or about March 20 to July 1

Click here to view a comprehensive table of planting specs

SWISS CHARD - Lucullus . A biennial plant that has large heavily savoyed green leaves with celery - like white stalks. Swiss Chard grows about 28 inches high throughout the summer and fall. Leaves can be eaten like spinach either fresh salad greens or cooked. The flavor is mild and delicious.

Planting: Plant very early in the spring in a sunny location as soon as the ground may be cultivated and enriched with organic material. Press soil firmly over seeds. Swiss Chard grows well in containers.

BEET - Detroit Dark Red is the most popular beet on the market and is recommended by Utah State University. The 2 ½ to 3 inch globe shaped roots are tender, sweet and can be harvested and eaten at any stage of growth. Beets prefer cool weather and tolerate a wide range of conditions. When young, the leaves make delicious greens, fresh or cooked.

Planting: Plant very early in the spring in a sunny , well drained location as soon as the ground may be cultivated and enriched with organic material. Press soil firmly over seeds. Sow seeds sparingly and repeat every three weeks as long as the weather is cool .

CARROT - Scarlet Nantes is a 5 ½ to 6 inch long coreless variety that has a fine sweet flavor for juice, fresh eating, cooking, and freezing. This popular and attractive carrot is recommended by Utah State University. This carrot will store for several months with cool temperatures and is high in vitamin content. Excellent variety for freezing or canning.

Planting: Plant in early spring in a sunny location with light or loose soil that is enriched with organic material. Sow seeds sparingly and press soil firmly over seeds. In areas with mild winters, fall planting is recommended.

LETTUCE ROMAINE - Paris Island Cos is a fine romaine lettuce with tight, medium to large upright heads with excellent deep - green color and fine flavor midribs that are crunchy and juicy . Romaine lettuces are among the most nutritious of all lettuce due to their higher chlorophyll content. Utah State University recommends this variety of lettuce.

Planting: Plant very early in the spring in a sunny location as soon as the ground may be cultivated and enriched with organic material. Press soil firmly over seeds. Sow seeds sparingly and repeat every two weeks as long as the weather is cool (Spring/Fall)

 

TENDER GROUP:

Bean, Sweet Corn, Cucumber, Zucchini

Plant on the average date of last spring frost, or when apple blossoms are open, or about May 5 to July 1

Click here to view a comprehensive table of planting specs

BEAN POLE- Kentucky Wonder Brown. Pods are 7 to 9 inches long, meaty and tender. Stringless when young. Vigorous vine produces a large yield of beans with excellent flavor. This outstanding bean is an excellent variety for eating fresh, canning and freezing. Resistant to bean mosaic virus.

Planting: Plant when all danger of frost is gone in a sunny location. The enriched with organic material ground should be cultivated and loosened for best results. Press soil firmly over seeds and keep moist.

SWEET CORN - Golden Bantam 8 is a hardy open pollinator variety with 5-6 inch long ears. Seed may be saved after harvest for subsequent planting. May be served fresh, frozen, or canned. To increase sweetness flavor of corn, add sugar to the boiling water when cooking the corn.

Planting: Plant when all danger of frost is gone in a sunny location. The enriched with organic material ground should be cultivated & loosened for best results. Press soil firmly over seeds and keep moist. Plant in blocks of at least 4 rows side by side to insure best results from pollination. Avoid 1 long row style planting. Plant every 3 weeks for extended harvest.

CUCUMBER - Straight Eight is a very popular and productive variety with fruits that are 8 to 9 inches long, 2 ½ inches across with smooth, dark green color. Excellent in salads either diced or sliced. Very delicious when eaten fresh with dressing or dips. Small cucumbers can be used for making pickles.

Planting: Plant in late spring in a sunny, well drained location when the cultivated and enriched with organic material ground is warm and all danger of frost is past. Press soil firmly over seeds. Start seeds indoors 4-6 weeks before setting outside for early crop.

SQUASH - Zucchini Black Beauty is a good flavored tender AAS Winner with dark green, glossy fruits that are long, straight, slender, and firm. One of the most popular type of summer squash that is very easy to grow. Zucchini has many uses and recipes that include preparation by baking, frying, steaming, raw, or freezing.

Planting: Plant in late spring in a sunny , well drained location when the cultivated and enriched with organic material ground is warm and all danger of frost is past. Press soil firmly over seeds. Start seeds indoors 3-4 weeks before setting outside for early crop.

 

VERY TENDER GROUP:

Pepper, Winter Squash, Tomato

Plant about two weeks after “C” or when there are little green apples on the tree or about May 20 to June 10

Click here to view a comprehensive table of planting specs

PEPPER - Yolo Wonder is an improved California Wonder variety that is recommended by Utah State University.This type has large 4 ½ inch by 4 inch, with 3 to 4 lobed, glossy peppers on large, sturdy plants with good foliage cover. Yolo Wonder L Pepper is resistant to Tobacco Mosaic virus. These green Peppers turn red at full maturity and flavors sweetens. As a favorite garden vegetable, peppers are eaten raw or cooked, as well as served in salads, stews, casseroles, as a garnish, stuffed or baked.

Planting: Start seeds indoors 7-8 weeks before last spring frost in a sunny, warm location. Transplant to a sunny, well drained location in the late spring when the cultivated and enriched with organic material ground is warm and all danger of frost is past.

WINTER SQUASH - Waltham Butternut is AAS Winner & recommended by Utah State University. This is an improved butternut type squash with better uniformity and larger yields. The fruits are tan in color and about 8 to 10 inches long, thick skinned with deep orange interiors. This popular squash is easy to grow and stores well when mature. Squash is a delicious vegetable that can be baked, boiled, steamed, fried, or frozen. The plants are prolific to a bountiful harvest.

Planting: Plant in late spring in a sunny , well drained location when the cultivated and enriched with organic material ground is warm and all danger of frost is past. Press soil firmly over seeds. Start seeds indoors 3-4 weeks before setting outside for early crop.

TOMATO - Rutgers 80 days. High yields of firm, meaty fruits. An exceptional fine mild flavor. Medium-large determinate vines. Resistant to Verticillium and fusarium wilts. Tomatoes are probably the most popular garden vegetable requiring little space and effort yet producing a large crop. Tomatoes can be eaten raw or juiced, dried, canned, baked, fried, and made into a range of sauces.

Planting: Start seeds indoors 5-8 weeks before last spring frost in a sunny, warm location in pots or flats. Transplant to a sunny, well drained location in the late spring when the cultivated and enriched with organic material ground is warm and all danger of frost is past. The transplanted plants should be about 5-12 inches tall. Tomatoes can be sown directly into the garden when the soil and weather is warm. Double hill planting ( 6 inches apart) and staking tomatoes upright or use a wire cage to increase production.

 

FALL PLANTINGS:

Beets, Cabbage, Lettuce, Onions, Peas, Spinach

plant June 1 to August 1

FERTILIZER is important for plants to increase yield. Use a fertilizer mixture of 16-16-8 or 16-20-0. With a hoe, make a 3-inch deep trench 4 inches away from the planted seed and apply 1 cup of fertilizer per 10-foot row. After 4 to 5 weeks, apply 1/3 cup of 34-0-0 per 10 foot row. Tomatoes may not need the second application of nitrogen if your soil is rich. Excessive nitrogen will cause plants to produce too many leaves and not enough ripe fruit.

USE SPACE WISELY as you layout your garden design. Precision planting to give each plant its space to develop will permit wide row or bed planting. A single row is not the way to get high yields. Arrange the plants in 3-5 feet wide areas; where there is no traffic to pack the soil and inhibit root growth. Train "sprawly" plants up fences. Use netting for cucumbers, beans, and tall peas to climb. Stake tomatoes upright or use a wire cage. Grow radishes or lettuce while widely spaced plants such as squash or tomatoes are developing. Plant pole beans when corn is about 12 - 15 inches high and they will have ready-made supports.

Garden_RaisedBeds

TIPS FOR MORE PRODUCTIVE GARDENING:

  • Beds of closely spaced plants that quickly shade the soil reduce weed germination.
  • Organic mulches such as leaves drastically reduce the need for weeding. They cool soil so wait until later in the season to mulch warm weather crops.
  • Shallow, regular cultivation destroys small weeds before they compete with your vegetables for moisture, nutrients, and light. One of the secrets to gardening is to take care of the weed problem before it becomes a large problem.
  • Plant only a few feet of a row at one time if planting lettuce, peas, radishes, and other crops which rapidly become over - mature at harvest time. Successive planting will also extend the harvest time.
  • Plant sweet corn in a block of three to four rows square instead of long single rows. You will get better filled ears of corn because of better pollination. The Native Americans planted corn in hills of 3-5 seeds for this very reason and fertilized adequately to help with such close planting.
  • For better tomato yields use double hill planting (about 12" between plants).
  • Control weeds early. Hoeing small weeds for an hour will save many hours of work later when the weeds are mature.
  • Control insects when they first appear.
  • Clear plastic around a frame, hot caps, or ‘Wall O’ Water’ may protect newly set plants from late spring frosts.
  • Clear plastic provides more soil warming than does black plastic. Black plastic allows no weed growth. Plastic that covers the soil 2-3 feet wide, having holes through which are planted warm season crops like squash or tomatoes can hasten their maturity.

This post was posted in Insight, Gardening

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