Monthly Archives: October 2012

  • I Think I Can

    By Angie Sullivan

    Want to enjoy that summer bounty long after the season ends? You can with canning. You might think that canning is only for your mother’s generation, or that it is way too hard for you. Well, if you have the right tools, canning can be fun and provide you with some delicious food storage from your own kitchen.

    Before you start, there are some things you need to know. First, there are different types of home canning. These include Hot Water Bath, Steam Canning, and Pressure Canning. (...)

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    Posted In: Insight, Preserving

  • Gardening Basics

    rows of lettuce

    Growing your own food is a great way to prepare for an emergency. Home gardening can be a lot of work, but it also brings many rewards. For example, becoming a proficient gardener can help you feed your family during financially hard times. (...)

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    Posted In: Insight, Gardening

  • Growing Your Own Food

    plants growing

    Growing a home garden is one of the best ways to keep fresh fruits and vegetables in your diet. A garden is also a great way to add nutrition and variety to your food storage. (...)

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    Posted In: Insight, Gardening

  • Emergency Cooking Basics

    |2 COMMENT(S)

    Sport Solar Oven Combo is a great item to keep in your gear to help with emergency cooking

    Imagine having to prepare and cook meals for your family from scratch, outdoors, and without electricity. (...)

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    Posted In: Insight, Emergency Cooking

  • Outdoor Cooking Tips

    Check out these outdoor camping tips to help you cook easier and better meals

    Cooking out in the open is a great way to enjoy the outdoors. It is also a wonderful way to prepare your family for emergencies by learning how to cook without electricity. (...)

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    Posted In: Insight, Emergency Cooking

  • First Aid First

    |2 COMMENT(S)

    Imagine for a moment that a major earthquake has just occurred in your town. The shaking takes you by surprise and you dash underneath a large table, hoping the table won’t collapse from the falling debris. You think of your family and their safety. When the trembling stops, you call out for your kids and are thankful everyone is responding. However, as you walk through to check up on everyone, you realize your home is absolutely ruined. (...)

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    Posted In: Insight, First Aid and Sanitation

  • Many of us are diligent in storing food and water for emergency use, but tend to forget to store items we use every day to stay clean and healthy. Many of these items would become luxuries during an emergency while others can help prevent contamination and illness. Start by making two lists of non-food items. First, list the items you definitely will use. Second, list the ones you may also need to help keep your surroundings clean. Begin with the first list and add those items to your home storage as soon as you can. (...)

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    Posted In: Insight, First Aid and Sanitation

  • Water Storage Overview

    |1 COMMENT(S)

    Water storage is arguably the most vital element of any emergency plan. The human body can live several days without food, but only a few days without water. When you consider that water sources can become contaminated or cut off during a natural or manmade disaster, it makes sense to store as much clean, drinkable water as possible.

    You’ll need water for hydration, cooking, and sanitation, so the more you have the better off you’ll be. (...)

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    Posted In: Insight, Water Storage

  • Water Storage Options

    |1 COMMENT(S)

    In most emergency situations, fresh drinking water is the most important item you can store. It is recommended to have both stationary emergency water storage and portable storage in containers light enough to carry in an emergency. Be sure to take into consideration that water weighs 8 lbs. per gallon.

    Preparedness authorities like FEMA recommend storing at least 14 gallons of water per person. Storing that much will allow each person to use one gallon a day for two weeks. (...)

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    Posted In: Insight, Water Storage

  • By Scott Pedersen, Vicki Tate, and Barry Crockett

    Next to air, water is what man needs most. In a challenging situation, it is critical to be able to find, store or treat water. Our bodies are about 80% liquids. We lose water in three ways: perspiration, breathing and urination. Dehydration of 6 to 8% of the body’s weight results in decreased body efficiency. In the summer heat, we lose about one gallon of water per day. Within three days of water depletion or loss, the body and organs can experience severe damage. (...)

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    Posted In: Insight, Water Storage

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