Welcome to Emergency Essentials!

Catalog Request

winter preparedness

  • Winter Survival on the Side of the Road

    5-miles-from-the-north-rim-via-stephen-krieg-photographics Winter Survival 45 miles from the North Rim - Photo via Stephen Krieg Photographics

    A sheriff’s official called it a “Christmas miracle.” On December 23 and 24, rescuers found a family that got stuck and then separated while trying to drive to the North Rim of the Grand Canyon, which was closed for the winter.

    The Klein family, of New Jersey, did some winter survival things well to survive their adventure, according to news coverage. They also made some mistakes that could have caused a tragic ending.

    The Kleins were willing to take an alternate route to get to their destination on December 22 when the primary route was closed. That, and the way father Eric Klein and 10-year-old son Isaac spent the night in the car, suggests they had enough fuel in the vehicle.

    “Never let your gas tank get below half,” said AAA Utah spokesperson Rolayne Fairclough. “In winter weather, if you’re detoured, you’ll have some flexibility, and you don’t have to worry about running out of gas.”

    The Forest Service road on which the Klein family got stuck didn’t have cell coverage. So the family agreed to have mother Karen Klein, a marathoner and triathlete who’d had some survival training, walk to the main road and get help. A few hours after she didn’t return, Eric walked the other way and found a high spot with enough cell coverage to call for help. That suggests they kept a cell phone charged.

    “Have a cell phone charger system so you have communications,” Fairclough said.

    “Don’t fail to signal for help, often and vigorously. Fire, smoke, and mirrors are good signals. Having a charged cell phone is a better one. Time is precious in a survival ordeal, so use it wisely to provide for your basic needs and be sure to signal at every opportunity,” wrote Tim MacWelch, a survival instructor, in a story for Outdoor Life.

    Karen Klein told “Good Morning America” she put snow in her cheek to keep hydrated.  At least she didn’t swallow it frozen.

    “Don’t eat ice or snow,” MacWelch warned. It can cause hypothermia. MacWelch suggested filling a bottle with snow or ice and putting it close to, but not next to, your skin, so body heat can melt it.

    Karen also stayed awake.

    "I just talked to myself and rocked back to stay warm," she told reporters.

    Car Stuck in Snow off a Road Winter SurvivalEven if you’re in a car, stay awake, especially when the engine is running, according to the North Dakota Department of Transportation.

    If you run the car engine, only run it 15 minutes every hour and keep the tailpipe clear of snow to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning. Also, keep windows cracked to avoid running out of oxygen.

    Karen Klein admitted they could have avoided this ordeal if they’d planned better.

    "As far as places being closed, we just didn't realize that these roads were closed and these visitor centers were closed," she told NBC News. "We didn't investigate that deeply."

    The main road to the North Rim, State Route 67, was closed.

    "Google Maps shows there's a way -- but it's impassable," Jim Driscoll, chief deputy for Coconino County, told the Associated Press, adding, "This is a problem we've had numerous times."

    During winter travel, stay on main roads, urges Ready.gov.

    “Avoid back road shortcuts,” the site urges. Tell someone where you’re going, your route, and expected arrival time.

    “If your car gets stuck along the way, help can be sent along your predetermined route,” Ready.gov said.

    Stay near your car Winter Survival

    When you’re stranded, stay close to your vehicle. The North Dakota Department of Transportation even suggests if you need to leave your vehicle, tie yourself to it with rope.

    Karen told NBC News she set out with only Cheerios to eat.

    Make sure you’ve got an emergency kit, Fairclough said.

    Keep cold weather gear like blankets or a sleeping bag, boots, a coat and gloves in the car, she said. Aluminum “space blankets” can fit in a glove compartment.

    Bring a power source for cell phones, a radio and a flashlight with extra batteries.

    Believe it or not, a candle can heat a whole car’s cabin, she said. Keep matches too, because extreme cold can freeze some lighters.

    Add water and high-energy food like candy, raisins, nuts, dehydrated and freeze-dried fruit, and jerky. Remember toilet paper.

    Finally, take tools and equipment for the car: signaling equipment like bright cloth or flares, chains, booster cables, a nylon rope and a shovel, sand or kitty litter for traction.

    In a pinch, you can use the car’s floor mats for traction, Fairclough said.

    “A lot of people just don’t put a shovel in their cars,” she admitted.

    The Kleins’ trip could have ended in disaster. Coconino County, Ariz., Sheriff Jim Driscoll told the Los Angeles Times that in the last month, three people in the county died from exposure.

    The family did some things right, and emergency responders from many agencies responded quickly. They survived. But their errors could have cost them their lives.

    “It can be a pretty hostile environment,” Driscoll told the Times.

     

    Winter_Storm_Blog_Image2 Winter Survival

  • How Prepared is Your Car?

     How Prepared is your car for an emergency?

    In light of the recent debacle in Georgia, when a dusting of snow over ice locked up roadways across the state, one local insurance company set out to see how prepared their city’s citizens were.

    According to Delawareonline.com, the “junk in the trunk” campaign hosted by State Farm found that, while drivers tend to leave or store plenty of items in their car, relatively few of them count as “emergency supplies” (not real sure how those mason jars are going to come in handy…).

    So, if you can’t quite think of a good use for old fast food bags and crusty beach towels from last summer, what should you stash in your car? FEMA has a good checklist, as does ReadyWisconsin who might know a thing or two about snow days, to get you and your vehicle prepared with the right supplies.

    Or, if you’re a level 5 prepping fanatic—and drive something more substantial than, say, a Civic hatchback—you can use the Allstate Insurance comprehensive, ready-for-absolutely-any-kind-of-road-trip-emergency checklist.

    Start here to gather materials, and don’t forget to clear out all the stuff from your car that you’ll never use! Except the ketchup packets. You really never know when you’ll need one of those.

     

  • The South Prepares for Huge Winter Storms

    Tweets show how the South is prepping for severe winter storms

    According to Accuweather.com, “A snow and ice storm will severely impact travelers and residents from northern Georgia to the Carolinas into Wednesday night.” This storm is even expected to stretch into Virginia and parts of Tennessee. It’s been reported that this could be one of the worst ice storms for parts of the South in more than 10 years.

    Recently the South has experienced massive ice and snow storms, uncharacteristic to the region. Two weeks ago, Atlanta, Ga. was hit hard by an expected storm that stranded thousands on the road overnight. Now, many residents are vowing not to get caught off guard again.

    Tweets show the South prepping for severe winter storms

    Lisa Nadir, a resident of Acworth, Ga., stated in a My Fox New York article, "Last time I was totally unprepared, I was completely blindsided….I'm going to be prepared from now on for the rest of my life."  Nadir sat in traffic for 13 hours and spent the night in her car on Jan. 28th when the first major storm hit.

    Like Nadir, many Georgia residents are preparing for this big, new storm. Wednesday afternoon, the business sector of downtown Atlanta was found deserted as many residents stayed home. Reluctant to experience a similar traffic jam as they saw two weeks ago, these residents are making a change to avoid being caught on gridlocked roads for hours.

    Tweets show the South prepping for severe winter storms

    On Wednesday morning, over 2,000 flights coming in and out of Atlanta International Airport were cancelled. And there are several images on Twitter from the New York Times and the Weather Channel showing grocery store shelves that have been practically picked clean as people stock up for the storm.

    Tweets show the South prepping for severe winter storms

    Tweets show the South prepping for severe winter storms

    Two major concerns with this storm are icy roadways and power outages. Freezing rain, sleet, and snow could (once again) leave many stranded on the road. And the weight of ice on tree limbs could cause them to fall onto power lines, creating widespread power outages.

    Take some cues from the spirit of preparation that many in Atlanta now have; prepare yourselves for winter storms with the following articles and products:

    Sources

    http://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/ice-storm-begins-to-unfold-in/23186487

    http://www.myfoxny.com/story/24688333/with-dire-storm-forecast-many-in-ga-stay-home

1-3 of 5

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
Back to Top