Tag Archives: water

  • October Product Highlight: 55-Gallon Water Barrel Combo

    55-gallon water barrel combo

    The 55-Gallon Water Barrel Combo is a great option to give you peace of mind during an emergency or city/county-wide boil order. During the month of October, this combo is on sale for $81.99, a $124.85 value. This combo will allow you to have clean, usable water stored right in your home if your normal water supply is disrupted or contaminated.

    This combo includes:

    •  55-Gallon Water Barrel: The minimum recommended amount of water for an emergency situation is one gallon per day per person for two weeks. This includes water for drinking, minimal cooking, and simple hygiene needs (sponge bath and teeth brushing). This means the 55-gallon barrel will provide:

    -          1 gallon of water for one person for fifty-five days

    -          27.5 gallons  per person for two people (nearly a month’s supply)

    -          13.75 gallons per person for four people (about a two week supply)

     

    • 1 Emergency Siphon: Allows you to access your water quickly from your 55-gallon barrel.
    • 1 Barrel Buddies II Bung and Gas Wrench: This tool will help you to open the barrel bungs with ease, giving you easier access to your water and allowing you to siphon water out. This tool is great because it can also be used as a wrench to turn off your gas valve during an emergency.

    You'll definitely need these two tools to help you access the water stored in your 55-gallon barrel safely during an emergency. Our 55-Gallon Barrel Combo is a great value and an excellent way to get started storing water for shelter-in-place circumstances.

    Siphon water from larger containers into portable containers

    If you’re interested in getting a 55-Gallon Water Barrel Combo, but you’re a first time barrel buyer, there are a couple of things that you should know about how to safely store and retrieve your water. Here are 5 frequently asked questions that first-timers often ask:

     

    What are the barrels made of?

    The barrels are constructed of sturdy, food-grade, # 2 BPA-free polyethylene plastic.  Each barrel is dark blue, limiting light exposure that can encourage algae growth in your water.

     

    Where should I keep my barrel?

    If you have a basement, storing your barrel there would be ideal.  In the basement, your barrel would be protected from excess heat and light. But if you don’t have a basement, you can keep your barrel anywhere you have room for it—on a back porch, in a carport, laundry room, or mud room. However, we do not recommend keeping it in the garage near engine fumes and where products such as fuels, oils, and paints are stored.

    Even though thick plastic seems impermeable, it is actually porous and will eventually absorb any chemical odors in the environment. These odors could  then leach into your water making its taste unpleasant.

    We also caution against placing your barrel directly on a concrete floor. We recommend placing planks or a sturdy wooden pallet under the barrel before filling. This provides a breathable barrier to help prevent mold and mildew growth. Once it’s filled, it’s not going anywhere--the water itself will weigh 440 lbs.! If you keep your barrel outdoors, you might want to get a [Barrel Bag] to slip over it to reduce accidental contamination from soil, bird droppings, and dust.

     

    What in the world is a bung?

    Bungs are the two white plugs on top of the barrel that allow you to fill your barrel and access your water. They are nearly impossible to remove without the proper tool. That’s why the 55-gallon combo comes with a bung wrench to help you open your barrel without breaking the bungs.

     

    Do I need anything else?

    Additional tools available include the Siphon Hose Adapter, which allows you to attach your siphon hose to a regular garden hose—useful for filling your barrel or emptying it to your yard, garden, bathtub, or wherever you choose. We also offer a [Drinking Water Safe Hose] in 25 and 50-foot lengths, which would be helpful in filling your barrel from your kitchen or bathroom water source, and the Bung Seal Cap, which fits over the bung opening and helps prevent contamination. You might also want a jug for transporting water from your barrel into your kitchen or bathroom. For this purpose, we offer a Standard Five-Gallon Jug made of #2 food-grade plastic, with a separately sold spigot, and both a 5-Gallon and 2.5-Gallon Collapsible Jug that  come with spigots. You’ll also need Aquamira Water Treatment that can keep a water barrel free from “bugs” for 5+ years.

     

    How long will my water last stored in a barrel?

    Water, unlike food, doesn’t spoil or “go bad” with time. However, we recommend rotating your water once a year or using Aquamira Water Treatment to make sure that your water is absolutely fresh when it comes time to use it.

    If it was clean when you put it into a clean barrel, and hasn’t been contaminated since, it will last indefinitely. If it tastes “flat,” just pour it back and forth between containers to aerate it before drinking. If you notice any strange odor to your water, however, you can of course change it out or treat it with a purifying agent. (See our blog post on water filtration and purification.)

     

     

    One of the easiest ways to begin or increase your water storage reserves is to purchase a water barrel combo to help you with your water storage maintenance. The 55-gallon combo is a great introduction to water storage for beginners, but it is also perfect for those who have water storage experience, making it easier to store and retrieve your water. For more information on water storage, filtration, and treatment visit these links:

     

    Water Storage Insight Articles

    Water-related Blog Posts

    “Water” Search results on Beprepared.com

     

     

     

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: water barrel combo, water barrel, water storage, water

  • Making Water Drinkable: Ways to Filter and Purify Water You Have on Hand

    |3 COMMENT(S)

    iStock_000020440738Large

    Water is so vital to our lives and well-being that it’s a number-one concern during emergency situations. It's even more important than food for the first few days when dehydration could set in and cause illness, confusion, and even death.

    You may know this and have emergency water storage. But maybe you have some old stored water that has a strange odor to it—or maybe you aren’t sure that your city’s water supply is really clean. You may have to get your water from an untested source such as a private well or spring, or bring water from a lake or river into your home during an emergency.

    So what are the dangers of drinking untreated water and how can you be sure it’s safe?

    What could be in the water?
    Out hiking or camping, we may come across a cold, running stream with clear, sweet water; it’s safe to drink, isn’t it? Well, it may be—or not. We can’t always see, taste, or smell the tiny pollutants that may be present. There could be anything in the water, from mud and chemicals to animal waste and decomposed matter to microorganisms like viruses, harmful bacteria and protozoans. Many a camper has brought home Giardia as a souvenir from a camping trip, and suffered from the severe digestive upset that results. So how can we avoid getting sick from questionable water sources? There are several ways to filter and purify water that can give you peace of mind about the sources you have access to at any given time.

    Boiling
    Often when a community water supply has been compromised, officials will issue a “boil order,” advising everyone to boil water (a full, rolling boil) for at least one minute before using it to drink, cook, wash dishes, wash the face, or brush teeth. Boiling water from a natural source is effective, too, killing both bacteria and viruses. (This can take longer in high elevations where water boils at a lower temperature.) If you don’t have gas or electricity, either in an emergency or on a camping trip, the boiling can be done over an open fire, on a grill, with a Kelly Kettle, or even in a solar oven set in bright sunlight for six hours.

    Filtration
    There are filters and then there are microfilters—and it’s important that you know the difference. A regular filter blocks the larger (but still tiny) impurities in water, improving the taste and color—but a microfilter can block both impurities and microorganisms that cause illness.

    Katadyn Vario Water Filter from Emergency Essentials

     

    Filters are commonly made of three materials:

    • Ceramic—filters out impurities of 0.2 microns or larger
    • Pleated glassfiber—filters out impurities of 0.3 microns or larger
    • Activated carbon (or charcoal)—which filters out impurities of up to 2 microns.

    For perspective, consider that a human hair has a diameter of about 100 microns, so we’re talking really tiny (but powerful) particles!

     

    Purification
    There are two basic methods of purifying water—UV Purification and Chemical Purification.

    • UV Purification works by killing the microorganisms with shortwave germicidal ultraviolet light. This light (invisible to us) works by disrupting the DNA of the little pests so that they can’t cause illness. UV purifies 99.9% of all microorganisms in just seconds. See our Steripen™ Ultra purifier and our Steripen™ Sidewinder purifier for a couple of great purification options.
    • Chemical purification also kills 99.9% of microorganisms, but it takes a while longer—about four hours. Chlorine Dioxide is the preferred chemical for water purification. Pure chlorine does not kill Cryptosporidium in amounts that would allow the water to be drinkable, nor does iodine, as the Crypto organism is iodine-resistant—but Chlorine Dioxide takes care of it, and improves the taste of the water. (Iodine, even if it worked, would give the water a foul taste.)

     

     WP-T160

    What are the specific microorganisms to worry about, and what works to get rid of them?

    • Viruses (Hepatitis A, Norwalk, Rotavirus) are the smallest particles to worry about (.018 microns); they need purification, not just filtration. They are less common in U.S. natural water sources than in other parts of the world, but they can exist here.
    • Bacteria are .5 microns and up, and include such “bugs” as E. Coli, Salmonella, and Campylobacter. Either microfiltration or purification is effective in getting rid of these.
    • Protozoans range from 2 to 15 microns and include Giardia and Cryptosporidium. Both filtration and purification are useful against these. The EPA reports that 95% of the world’s natural water supply contains protozoan cysts.
    • Turbidity is the name for “gunk” in the water—floaties, waste, insect, dirt, silt, and chemicals. These affect the taste and the drinkability of the water. Filtration is the method to remove the first five, and activated carbon can remove some chemicals, but not all—so that it’s always important to find the cleanest source of water you can before treating it.

     

    Not only is it important for you to store good, clean water, but also to know how to and have the means to filter or purify the water you have at your disposal at any given time, be it from your tap or from a natural source such as a river or spring. Learn more about water filtration and storage in our Water Storage Insight Articles.

     

    Sources:
    www.beprepared.com
    www.water.epa.gov/drink/emergency/safe_water/personal.html
    www.cdc.gov/travel/page/water-disinfection

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: water purification, water filters, water

  • First Aid for Dehydration

    |2 COMMENT(S)

     iStock_000015080090XSmall_drinking water

    Each day, most of us are mildly dehydrated without even knowing it.

    Just think about it: during the workday is there ever a time in the afternoon that you start to get very, very sleepy? Well, according to Camelbak and the University of Connecticut’s Human Performance Laboratory, dehydration is the #1 cause of afternoon fatigue, especially during the summer.

    With temperatures reaching 100 degrees or higher, I’ve found myself getting tired at 2:00 in the afternoon and drinking more Root Beers, Slurpees, and Sonic Cream Slushes than water to battle the heat. And it’s taken its toll, especially because I didn’t realize that dehydration was to blame.

    I’ve had headaches and been dizzy, moody and tired, always thinking that something else was wrong and never thinking that the solution could be as simple as drinking more water.

    What Causes Dehydration?

    Many people think that not drinking enough water is the cause of dehydration. However, not drinking enough water is only part of the reason why a person could become dehydrated.

    • Our bodies are made up of 70% water
    • Each day we typically lose a portion of that water from urination, bowel movements, sweat, and tears
    • The problem comes when we don’t replace the water we are losing, causing our body’s water percentage to decrease

    The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center suggests that when we lose water, we also lose salt and electrolytes in our systems that are vital to life. This combination of the loss of salt and water causes dehydration.

    How do you recognize dehydration? What are the signs and symptoms?

    For Adults:

    • Thirst/dry mouth
    • Headache
    • Dizziness
    • Lightheadedness
    • Dark urine or urinating less frequently (maybe one or two times a day)
    • Sleepiness
    • Constipation
    • Little to no tears when crying
    • Dry skin
    • Muscle cramps (especially during exercise)

    For Children:

    • Lack of urine or wet diapers for 6-8 hours (lack of urine for 12 hours in older children)
    • Little to no tears when crying
    • Eyes look sunken into head
    • Soft spot on baby’s head looks sunken
    • Irritability, less active
    • Fatigue or dizziness in older children

    What should you do if you are dehydrated?

    • Rehydrate, of course! Mild dehydration can be easily treated at home by drinking more water.
    • Drink water or sports drinks (sports drinks can replace electrolytes, salt lost through sweating and other water loss).
    • According to the Institute of Medicine, Men should drink 13 glasses of water a day (about 3 liters) and women should drink about 9 glasses a day (about 2.2 liters)

    Many of us have heard the 8x8 rule: drink eight, 8 oz. glasses of water a day to stay hydrated. However, this advice isn’t supported by hard scientific evidence. But it is close to the recommended amount of water we should drink and is easy to remember. That’s why it sticks around, but we should be drinking more water than the 8x8.

    When should you seek medical attention for dehydration?

    In extreme cases, seek medical attention for dehydration. Symptoms of severe dehydration are as follows:

    • Extreme thirst
    • Extremely dry mouth, skin, and mucous membranes (nose, mouth, throat, eyelids, ears )
    • Low blood pressure
    • Rapid heartbeat
    • Lack of sweat when active
    • Sunken eyes
    • Shriveled or dry skin
    • Rapid breathing
    • Fever
    • Delirium or unconsciousness (in extreme cases)

    However, according to recent studies conducted by the University of Connecticut’s Human Performance Laboratory, even mild dehydration can cause big problems such as mood changes, memory impairment, headaches, and constipation.  Be on a look out for these changes as well.

     How can you avoid getting into the dehydration danger zone in the first place?

    • Right when you get up in the morning, drink a glass of water.
    • Drink a glass of water before each meal.

    Have a water bottle on your desk at work (or in your bag at school). Seeing the bottle will help you stay hydrated. For more tips on how to stay hydrated watch these tips for how to Feel “A Little Bit Better” with water!!

     

    or

    Camelbak video: Tips for staying hydrated

     

    Sources:

    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dehydration/DS00561/DSECTION=symptoms

    http://kidshealth.org/parent/firstaid_safe/emergencies/dehydration.html

    http://today.uconn.edu/blog/2012/02/even-mild-dehydration-can-alter-mood/

    http://medicalcenter.osu.edu/patientcare/healthcare_services/emergency_services/non_traumatic_emergencies/dehydration_heat_stroke/Pages/index.aspx

    http://bodyecology.com/articles/dehydration_more_common_than_realize.php#.UgU8cdJJOSo

    http://www.cnn.com/HEALTH/library/water/NU00283.html

     

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: water, First Aid

  • Water Restrictions Making you Blue?

    iStock_000016955692XSmall_Blonde_Woman_Drinks_Water

    On Friday, June 28th, Lindon, Utah, a town of about 10,348 inhabitants, issued a drinking water restriction for its residents because an E. coli outbreak was discovered in the city’s water system. Since Emergency Essentials headquarters is located in Orem, Utah, right next door to Lindon, this E. coli outbreak hit rather close to home for some of our employees.

    On Friday night, I watched Utah’s ABC 4 news report about the E. coli outbreak. Reporters stated that city officials say that the entire water system would have to be flushed out and every tank and pipe in the city would have to be disinfected. The city issued mandatory boil order for its residents until the water was cleaned and the restriction was lifted on June 30th.

    This mandatory water restriction/boil order raises some interesting questions for emergency preparedness. How common and realistic is this scenario? What would you do if a water restriction was issued in your area? Have you already experienced this?

    The Utah Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) has issued recommendations on how to boil and store water if a water restriction is announced in your city. Here are some things you should consider doing to help you and your family stay safe:

    -          Bring water to a rolling boil for a minimum of one minute

    -          When it cools, you can pour your clean water into clean containers and refrigerate

    -          Adding a pinch of salt per quart to your boiled water may improve the taste

    -          Instead of boiling water, you can also disinfect it by adding 1/8 teaspoon of bleach (common household bleach containing 5.25 percent sodium hypochlorite) per gallon of water. Do not use bleach containing perfume, dyes, or other additives.

    When a boil order is issued, it pertains to almost all the ways you use water in your household—the obvious exception being flushing the toilet. The DEQ even has a chart that shows what tasks in your home should be done with boiled water. But having to boil water to do simple everyday tasks—washing your face, brushing your teeth, or cooking your food—could also be annoying and inconvenient.

    If boiling your water is inconvenient, many might say: “Well why not just buy a ton of bottled water? Problem solved!” While bottled water may seem like an easy solution to your water restriction woes (and in many instances it can be), in a water restriction, bottled water can get cleared off the shelves as quickly as bread, milk, and eggs in a snow storm. Also, if the city does not know how long the boil order might last buying bottled water could get pricey.

    So, when you can’t rely on bottled water, what’s another alternative you can turn to? –Water Storage! If you have an adequate supply of water storage (the recommended minimum amount of water to store is one gallon per day, per person, for 14 days), you will not have to worry about boiling your water or worrying that bottled water will run out at the store.

    Our product specialist, Tim, currently lives in Lindon and had to host part of his family reunion during the water restriction.  In order to make it through his family reunion, Tim is relying on water storage from his 55 gallon barrels and 160 gallon reserve tank system.

    He also plans to use a Katadyn Base Camp Gravity Filter to supply water for his guests. You simply hang the Base Camp Gravity Filter up and it filters up to 2 gallons of water in 15 minutes with no pumping. It will clean up to 200 gallons of water before you have to change out the filter component.

    If you are interested in building up a water storage supply, check out our Insight Article, "Water Storage Options", look into our water storage product page, and consider buying a water storage combo.

    Here is one piece of advice Tim shared for surviving a water boiling order: Once you have enough boiled water stored, shut off the valves to your faucets so your family doesn’t use the sinks out of habit. Don’t turn off the main water valve because you’ll still want to flush the toilet and get more water from the sink if you need to boil more.

    Be prepared for a water restriction or boiling order in your area. Learn how to adequately boil water and store water.

    If you’ve been through a boil order before, what tips do you have?

     

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: water storage, water

  • Water Purification and Storage

    iStock_000016955692XSmall_Blonde_Woman_Drinks_Water

    A couple of weeks ago Popular Mechanics wrote about Perforene which Lockheed Martin is developing as a new desalination technology using reverse osmosis.  Here’s how it works. 

    A membrane separates two chambers, and the side holding the salt water is subjected to pressure, forcing the water to pass through the membrane and leave the salt, which is too large to cross the barrier. 

    (Aside: The Hydropack sold by Emergency Essentials works in a similar way, but through forward osmosis. And to be clear, you cannot use the Hydropack in salt water.)

    By making desalination more efficient and less costly, this new technology can provide clean water to more people around the world. (Read more: Lockheed's Better, Faster Way to Desalinate Water)

    But lack of water in the U.S. is still a concern. NOAA published their Spring 2013 Outlook and they’re predicting a warm spring. Unfortunately that means warmer-than-average weather and drought conditions for parts of the country. (Watch the video for details.) For areas with snow, a warm spring might also mean flooding.

    Possible drought in your area means, on a household level, that your garden and lawns might get less water this year. Flooding brings possible contamination of water lines, though they are generally safe. I would take this as a nudge to start storing water. Even if you don’t end up using the water for drinking, you can use the water on your garden, houseplants, or for washing your car.

    Now the question is, “How should I store water?” Emergency Essentials has three articles on how to properly store and purify water.

    1. Water Storage Overview
    2. Water Storage Options 
    3. Water Filtration and Purification

    You may also want to check out FEMA’s website.

    And last, but not least, click here to read more on Emergency Essentials newest water storage option! (A lot of Emergency Essential Employees are clamoring to get one.)

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: floods, purifier, water storage, water

  • Lessons Learned, Volume 1: Natalie Survived the Northeast Blackout of 2003

    |3 COMMENT(S)

    This post is part of a series showcasing real-life survival stories. 'Lessons Learned' is a way for individuals and families to share what they learned from living through a disaster. To read all Lessons Learned stories, click here. To submit your own story, click here.

    The Northeast Blackout of 2003 affected 45 million people, including my family. The blackout started on August 14. I was 13 at the time, with a 10-year old sister, 3-year old brother, and two older brothers who were 15 and 18. My younger sister had a blast swimming in our neighbor’s pool during this time, but I didn’t dare get in because I didn’t want to be covered in chlorine for days. As a pre-teen girl, the idea of not taking a shower for four days was mortifying. There was one day when it poured rain so hard that I was actually able to get in my bathing suit and take a quick shower in the rain.

    During the day we felt like we were roasting and wished we had something like a solar generator to power a simple fan. The nights were alright because it gave us a chance to cool off, but scary because everything was pitch black. Fortunately, my mother was prepared ahead of time with emergency candles, 72 hour kits, and a supply of food storage and water. The biggest thing we should have done differently is having moist wipes like the Ready Bath Basics, and a portable toilet. Luckily, our neighbors let us use their pool water to flush our toilet. We wished we had more water because we went through it so quickly. Many food storage products require water to prepare them, which is something we did not consider fully when deciding how much water to store.

    Natalie Haight

     

    Thanks Natalie, for sharing your survival story. You did a great job of pointing out essential items to have in an emergency.

    Luckily Natalie’s family could stay in their home and were able to survive with their emergency kit that included water, food, and lighting. Fellow preppers, storing water should be a priority for you and your family.

    Here are a couple lessons we gleaned from Natalie's story:

    • Store enough to have at least 1 gallon per person per day for 14 days. Store more to make bathing and toilet flushing more than a luxury. Click here to see Emergency Essentials’ water storage options.
    • Consider how you might keep your family cool if you’re struggling to survive hot summer weather. You might open all the doors and windows to create ventilation, but do you have netting to keep out insects? Click here to explore various survival scenarios.
    • Have a swimming pool.*

    What did you learn from Natalie’s survival story?

     

    *Tee hee hee. Juuust kidding.

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: Blackout, Lessons Learned, emergency preparedness, water storage, water, Emergency plan, solar power, emergency power, food storage

  • Baby Steps February 1, 2013

    |2 COMMENT(S)

    It’s February and before we kick off this month of falling in love here are three super simple, super small baby steps for you to breeze through this weekend.
     
    1. Learn the difference between dehydrated foods and freeze-dried foods.
       Dehydrated= most of food’s water is removed naturally or via heat
     
       Freeze-Dried = food is flash frozen, placed in a vacuum chamber and sublimated

       (Sublimation= ice is changed directly from a solid to a gas and removed)
     
       What's the difference? Dehydration is the best way to get rid of moisture for grains, legumes,
       baking mixes, and some fruits and vegetables (like carrots). Freeze-drying retains much of 
       the foods' appearance, flavor, nutritional value, and it stores longer.   
     
       Read up on the difference in our 15 Tips for Food Storage Shopping.
     
       Bonus points for someone who tries either a dehydrated or freeze-dried food for the first time!   
       Click here for recipes suggestions then tell us about your experience in the comments below.

     

    2. Add one month’s worth of these non-perishable items to your supply:
    Toilet paper

    Personal toiletries like diapers, baby wipes, adult 
    briefs, sanitary napkins, tampons 

    ReadyBath Wipes (These are pre-moistened 
                antibacterial washcloths for bathing.) 


    3. Learn how to shut off the gas and water to your home.

    DON’T actually turn off the gas though, ‘cause no one wants to wake up to a cold shower. Plus in your area you might have to pay the gas company to come turn it back on. (Might be good practice for using some of your other prepper gear though...)

    Click here for instruction from The Family Handyman
    Make sure you have these tools and hang them where they’ll be used.
                    Bung wrench
                    Emergency Gas Shut Off Wrench


    Easy, right?
     
    Which one are you going to do? 

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: water, freeze-dried foods, 15 Tips, gas, bung wrench, dehydrated, baby steps

  • Water Challenge: One Gallon of Water for One Day

    |21 COMMENT(S)

    Similar to other emergency drills practiced for earthquakes, fires, and tornadoes, this drill is intended to familiarize your family with a difficult situation. They may also become more confident and prepared to deal with other challenges that could arise. Use wisdom and caution when trying out this challenge. Keep members of your family well hydrated and it will be a good experience for everyone.

    The Challenge

    Consider living at least 24 hours with only one gallon of stored water per family member per day. For example: a family of four would need to live off of 4 gallons of water for a 24 hour period.

    You may be thinking this will be easy. Anyone can go without cooking or extensive cleaning for 24 hours. You can expect that your children will have no problem drinking less than a gallon of water per day. However, consider average water usage in non-emergency situations. (Pic)

    Water Challenge: One Gallon of Water for One Day

    When you begin to consider sanitation, cooking, and washing clothes you'll notice that one gallon of water is an absolute minimum.

    After completing this challenge you may want to take some time to evaluate what occurred and re-evaluate your family's preparedness plans. Were the proper tools available to cope with limited water use? Would one gallon of water per person per day be sufficient for your family? Most recommendations are for 2-5 gallons of water per person per day in an emergency. Spend some time discussing the results with your family and adjust your plans accordingly.

     

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: water storage, water

  • Getting Started

    |11 COMMENT(S)

    Many people ask, “Where do I begin when it comes to Emergency Preparedness?

    We'd answer that question by saying that the first thing you should do is to get information first. Information is the most valuable tool to have in an emergency. We have a large collection of Emergency Preparedness Insight Articles that can help you to obtain this vital preparedness information.

    Get Started on your Prepping by reading Emergency Essentials Insight Articles

    Insight Article Topics:

    Take a look at some of these articles to start or refresh your prepper education. These articles will help get yourself and your family invested in emergency preparedness. There are over 90 articles to choose from within 13 different categories. Insight Categories include:

     

    Preparedness Checklists and Downloads

    Another great way to get started (with no cost involved) is to develop a personal or family emergency preparedness plan. Check out our Preparedness Checklist page to start creating an emergency plan or to build your emergency kit today. You can print these plans directly from our website. Here are the checklists we have to offer:

     

    A Few More Tips for Getting Started

    Here are a few ideas and tips to get you started with your preparedness plan after you have your Family Evacuation Plan in place:

    • Establish a modest preparedness budget. Make it a priority and work at it the best you can. Start with a few items, such as: water (both portable and permanent), an emergency kit, emergency candles, a sleeping bag, and a first-aid kit or an emergency bag.
    • Get your information from reliable sources. Don’t let anyone scare you into thinking that it has to be done all at once or that you must incur heavy debt to achieve your goals.
    • Use short-term storage as a guide for long-term needs. The items required to sustain life for three days can easily be multiplied for planning long-term storage needs.
    • Be consistent. Within a short time you will have the necessary supplies and equipment to take care of yourself, family members, and others.
    • Think investment, not expense. Take care of what you purchase and learn not to waste.

    Remember that babies, small children, the elderly, pets, and those with special medical needs require special consideration when planning for an emergency. We offer some great information to help you with these groups.

    For those of you wondering how and where to begin, we hope this post will be helpful. For others who have already started, we welcome your input to help and assist those who are just beginning. An inner confidence results as one strives to do their best to become prepared.

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: special needs, Preparedness Checklist, emergency kit checklist, getting started, water storage, water, First Aid, children, family, Emergency plan, pets

  • 5-minute Evacuation

    |16 COMMENT(S)

    My wife and I recently celebrated our 18th anniversary at a local bed and breakfast. While eating breakfast we met a very nice lady from Santa Barbara. She is a ballet dance instructor at UCSB and was in town for a regional dance competition. I asked her if the current fires were close to her home, and she said that she had been evacuated the day before. (The fires have completely burned 77 homes and damaged an additional 22. 30,000 people were evacuated and have now returned, but they are to remain ready to leave again at a moments notice.) She said that she was given about 5 minutes to get what she needed and leave– possibly never to return.

    This got me thinking about how can we prepare for this type of emergency. If you were given only 5 minutes to go through your house for the last time, would you be prepared to do so? I asked some of our seasoned employees here at EE what they would recommend doing to be prepared for a situation like this.

    They consistently mentioned the following 3 recommendations (click on the hyperlinks to read more on each topic):

    1) Have a family evacuation plan.

    2) Sustain life by having some type of emergency kit (including water) near an exit.

    3) Preserve and protect your valuables, such as important documents or special family photos. You need to decide what is most valuable to you and your family and then come up with a way to protect it.

     

    Here are some excerpts from a letter we just received from one of our customers:

    Dear Emergency Essentials,

    I just wanted to thank you for your company and the great products you provide. I decided about two months ago that our family should purchase 72 hours of MRE food…It arrived about a week ago. Little did I know the timing couldn't have been better.

    In the past three days we have experienced six fires in our valley. Sunday, we got our 72 hour kit and food ready to go in our car. Monday, half of our ward in Saugus and part of the adjacent Stake in Canyon Country was evacuated. We were only block away from the evacuated area. Luckily our area did not evacuate and the others in our ward were able to go home the same day. But, a few in the other Stake lost their homes. Then later on Monday, another ward in our Stake a few miles away in Stevenson Ranch had to evacuate immediately with a new fire. The fire went by fast and the fire department was able to protect all the homes. Then on Tuesday a fire started just down the road from us, but was put out quickly with two helicopters…

    …It was so comforting to know we had our kit, food and a safe place to go.

    Thank You,
    Laura, California

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: 72 hour kit, valuables, photos, documents, water filters, water storage, evacuation plan, evacuation, water, bug out bag, Emergency plan, emergency kit, planning

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