Tag Archives: tools

  • 12 Tools You Need For Survival

    Preparing for emergency situations and natural disasters may seem overwhelming—but it doesn't need to be. We’re here to make it as easy as possible. That’s why we've created this infographic: The 12 Tools You Need for Survival. It’s a simple roadmap to help you get all the gear you need to stay safe and healthy in a crisis.

    Whether you live on a dozen acres of your own land or in a studio apartment in the city, this list will help you gather just the right food, shelter, and supplies that make sense for you and your family.

    Click here or on the image above to see the full infographic.

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: tools, Survival, survival gear, infographics

  • Pennies for Prepping Banner

    Hi, friends.

    For my prepping this month, I set aside $30 at the beginning of the month, and so far I’ve saved an additional $4.09. Adding that to the $9.08 I had left after my October purchases, I had $43.17 to work with this month (anything I save for the rest of November will go toward December purchases).

    Here’s my haul for the month—a lot of smaller purchases, but good’uns that I really needed to add to my supplies.

    2 - Splinter Out 10-pack ($3.98 for both)

    Pennies for Prepping: Splinter Out 10-pack

     

    I got a splinter earlier this month, and it took me about 15 minutes to get the stinking thing out of my finger. I had a pair of tweezers, but they were still too bulky to be helpful. I wished 2 or 3 times during that process that I would have had a Splinter Out on hand.

    1 - 11-function Survival Tool ($1.29)

    Pennies for Prepping: 11-Function Survival Tool

    How genius is this? 11 functions in one flat, credit-card-sized tool. I can slide it right into my wallet and always have it on hand. I’ll probably end up getting one for each of my emergency kits, but for now I’ll just get one for my everyday carry. Looking for a super-affordable holiday gift for your friends or coworkers? This is one that is functional, doesn’t take up a ton of space, and is easy to wrap (just slap a sticker-back bow or gift tag on it).

    1 - Wool Blend Blanket ($11.49)

    Pennies for Prepping: Wool Blend Blanket

    I’ve been eyeing this wool blanket for a while now, and I finally snagged it this month. I’m going to drop it in the trunk of my car to go with the rest of my car emergency kit. Being stranded on the road in the winter won’t seem quite as bad with this puppy in my trunk (and the plethora of hand warmers I’ve got stashed in my car kit).

    1 - P-38 Can Opener ($0.50)

     Pennies for Prepping: P-38 Can Opener

    I’m going to include the super-awesome crank-turn can opener in my emergency supplies, but for now I’m just going to grab this P-38 to stick in my emergency kit. I don’t have any canned foods in my bug-out bag—mostly MREs and Milennium bars—but it may be helpful if I find canned food (or in some other application).

    1 - MyChoice BBQ Sauce Mix ($8.99)

    Pennies for Prepping: MyChoice BBQ Sauce Mix

    No explanation needed. It’s delicious. You should get some. (BBQ chicken, pork, or beef in an emergency? Yuuuuuuum.)

    1 - #10 Can Apple Cinn. Pancake Mix ($9.99)

    Pennies for Prepping: Large can Apple Cinnamon Pancake Mix

    What is better than hot pancakes on a crisp morning while camping? Apple-cinnamon pancakes, that’s what! This tasty mix brings a fun flavor to your flapjacks, and all you need to do is add water and get the griddle going.

    1 - Fox 40 Classic Whistle ($5.95)

    Pennies for Prepping: Fox 40 Classic Whistle

    Since I’m at the office as I type this, I’m trying to remember if I have a whistle in my emergency supplies. I don’t think I do, but even if this Fox 40 Classic Whistle ends up being a duplicate, there are so many applications for a whistle, I plan to have several anyway. This particular whistle is going in my purse so I can use it for personal safety or emergency situations I may encounter every day (can you tell I’m building up my everyday carry?).

     

    So, that’s what I bought with my to-date November savings. I can’t wait for next month, when I’ll not only show you my December purchases (I’m eyeing a few things, but haven’t made any final decisions), but I’ll provide a recap of how much money I spent over the whole year and what I was able to get with just my spare change and extra cash I was able to set aside each month.

    What items have caught your eye this month? Anything you’re saving up for? Let me know in the comments!

    --Urban Girl

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: Urban Girl, Prepping on a Budget, tools

  • We've got relationships on the brain this month. Having a friendly relationship with your neighbors can be a crucial survival tool. Ideally every individual and family is prepared, but it’s almost impossible to gather all the information, knowledge, skills, and equipment you’ll need for every possible scenario. This is where building a neighborhood group or a network of prepared people can help.

    Once you’ve got your basic short-term survival kit and food storage taken care of, take a look at other prepared families and see how you might help each other. The idea is to find like-minded, trustworthy individuals who have differing skills, and are willing to work together in a crisis.

    To make sure your support network is in place before disaster hits, follow these baby steps.

    Baby Step 1: Make a list of your skills and resources.

    Think of services you can provide and what equipment you have.

    Baby Step 2: Make a list of skills and resources you need.

    Some of the most valuable resources are people with skills and equipment that are common, yet specialized. Here are some commonly needed skills:

    • Paramedic, nurse, other medical workers
    • Construction workers (with access to a backhoe, jackhammer, or crane)
    • Electricians, plumbers, carpenters, or masons
    • Mechanics, drivers, or people with a HAZMAT license

    Baby Step 3: Meet your neighbors.

    Borrow a cup of sugar. Yeah, it’s an excuse… but if you need a reason, this one is as good as any. To thank them, make a batch of something sweet and when you take it over, chat for a bit.

    If you’re not the outgoing, introduce-yourself-in-person type, no problem! Diane Schmidt at About.com has a great idea.

    “I once wrote a note and attached it to a jar of homemade jam and left it on a neighbor's porch. I introduced our family, said where we lived, and that we were around if they needed anything. It was simple and brief and in return, we found some really great friends.”

    Baby Step 4: Get to know your neighbors better.

    Invite your neighbors over for a backyard hot dog roast, a mid-winter wassail party, or multi-family game night. The event doesn't have to be elaborate. In fact, you’ll enjoy it more if it’s casual, low-key, and fun.

    • Play games based on specific skills: knot tying, communication, problem solving, first aid, etc.
    • Play a get-to-know-you game: Write questions on cards and use them as prompts.

                            Given a specific situation (stranded in your car, lost in the woods, etc.) what would you do?

                            Have you ever survived a natural disaster?

    If your neighbors don’t respond enthusiastically, don’t get discouraged. There are plenty of people in town who are interested in prepping. They may lay low, but you’ll find them.

    Baby Step 5: Reach out to people in your area via our Forum.

    Our forum is a virtual network across the U.S. Contributors actively discuss topics and answer each other’s questions. You’ll find that there is a wide range of participants, from beginners to seasoned preppers. Click here to visit the Emergency Essentials Forum.

    You may also consider posting a note on the message board at a local outdoor supplier, hunting and sporting goods store, or on the American Prepper Network.

    Always use caution when communicating via the internet. Don’t post any personal information like your home address or phone number. If you are going to meet someone you’ve been introduced to online, meet in a public place, tell someone you trust where you’re going, who you’re meeting, and when you plan to return.

    Build up a network before a disaster hits your neighborhood!

    Check back next Friday for a list of skills you’ll want in your support network but probably haven’t considered.

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: resources, skills, baby steps, dinner, Networking, Neighbors, tools, party