Tag Archives: skills

  • Each Monday in January, we’re sharing our Preparedness New Year’s Resolutions for 2014. If you’d like to make some Prepping Resolutions of your own, but don’t know where to start, borrow some of our resolutions or use this series to get some ideas.

    This week we are talking about Outdoor Gear. Click here to check out Last week’s resolutions for Indoor Gear.

    Here is what our Emergency Essentials’ bloggers plan on getting to take with them into the great outdoors in 2014.

    Prepper Style New Year's Resolutions: Outdoor Gear

     

    Prepper Style New Year’s Resolutions : Outdoor Gear

    Sharon

    I resolve to get some good fire-starting supplies, such as the nifty little Sparkie Fire Starter, a can of Fired Up!, and some Waterproof and Windproof Matches. This would make it so much easier to start a campfire or get the charcoal grill going quickly, especially in windy conditions.

    Sarah

    If you’ve followed the Pennies for Prepping series, you may know that I bought a bit of outdoor gear last fall, including the Teton Outfitter XXL 1-Man Quick Tent and a Klymit Static V sleeping pad. I already have a sleeping bag, but I’d like to get something warmer this year, ideally before I go winter camping—maybe to something like the High Unita Gear Sleepy Ridge 10-Degree Sleeping Bag. I also want to get an Optimus Vega canister stove. Because, if I’m going to get a canister stove, it might as well be one that will work during all four seasons.

    Angela

    My New Year’s Resolution for outdoor gear is to learn how to make awesome shelters for different situations. I want to read and research about different shelters and how you make them in the Sense of Survival. Then, I want to go and test it out with a few materials I already have on hand at home. I want to do this so I can figure out what items I would need to make a stellar, warm, and insulated shelter. So I already know that I really want a ripstop tarp or two, duct tape, and maybe a tent like the Mountainsmith Morrison Two-person Tent if I can’t figure out how to make a shelter from natural materials. . .

    Kim

    This year, I’m going to learn how to start (and extinguish) a campfire. To learn this new skill, I want to add fire starting tools to my family’s emergency kits and camping supplies. Our family loves to camp, but not knowing how to build a fire can ruin the adventure pretty quickly on a cold night.  We will be adding the Sparkie, Spark-Lite, and H-25 Strike Master fire starters to our kits. We want to have a variety of fire starters on hand to ensure that we have a reliable method of lighting a fire, no matter the situation. (What if I lose one? If that’s my one and only method of starting a fire, I’m in trouble). By the end of 2014, my family will be campfire starting (and extinguishing) experts!

     

    What’s Your Advice?

    If you had to survive in the outdoors, what else would you bring?

    This is our last week for New Year’s Resolutions.  Now, let’s see how many of them we can keep! Check back here to see how we are making progress on our goals in the coming months.

    Check out all the Prepper Style New Year’s Resolutions from the beginning of January on our blog.

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: skills, emergency kit, Survival, emergency preparedness

  • Each Monday in January, we’re sharing our Preparedness New Year’s Resolutions for 2014. If you’d like to make some Prepping Resolutions of your own, but don’t know where to start, borrow some of our resolutions or use this series to get some ideas.

    This week we're  talking about Survival Skills. Take a look at last week’s resolutions for Food and Water Storage.

    Prepper style New Year's Resolutions for Survival Skills

    Here is what our Emergency Essentials’ bloggers plan on doing to hone their Survival Skills in 2014:

    New Year’s Resolution Prepper Style: Survival Skills

    Sharon

    I resolve to experiment with and learn different alternative cooking skills, such as basic thermos cooking and one-pot meals on a Single Burner Folding Stove with a Heat Cell Canister. I hope to get a Volcano Collapsible Grill with an Oven Lid and learn to use it for both grilling and baking using the Volcano Dutch Oven. I also plan to continue learning how to grow vegetables successfully in pots. (Last summer’s results were mixed: the cucumbers and peppers were great, but the eggplants were so small I kept waiting for them to grow large enough to harvest while they were actually growing old!)

     

    Sarah

    You may or may not know that, growing up, I used to go camping and hiking with my family all the time. As I grew older, I kicked my inner tomboy to the curb and embraced the world of stilettos and manicures. This year I’m letting the pendulum swing back to middle ground and I’ll be spending some more time outdoors, practicing and learning some survival skills (like building a fire or a shelter, orienteering, etc.). I’m also going to do some canning and dehydrating this year, which will be a totally new experience for me. There are dozens of skills I want to learn, but I’m trying to pace myself, so the first thing I’m going to do is a winter camping trip where I’ll practice building an emergency shelter and a fire. (Wish me luck. But if you’re worried about me, also know that I’m absolutely taking a tent. And an armful of hand and body warmers.)

    Angela

    Sometimes my husband acts like he’s a “dead body” and tells me to try to carry him out of a “burning house” (yes, I know this is weird). It’s annoying when he does it, but I fail at dragging him even two feet every time. This makes me think that I need to strength train to be able to get him to safety if something happened. So my New Year’s Resolution for skills is to learn various methods for carrying another person, strength training (so that I can lift more than 30 pounds . . .), and exercising more in case we have to evacuate on foot, or build a shelter.

     

    Kim

    Once upon a time I was CPR and First Aid certified . . . that was like 6 ½ years ago. This New Year, I resolve to relearn (and get re-certified) in First Aid and CPR. I just hit my one year wedding anniversary this last December and it’s made me realize that I want to be able to be self-reliant in protecting my family, if it comes to that. My husband and I ski . . . a lot. By developing First Aid skills, I will be better prepared to take care of my husband if he gets hurt while we’re skiing (before ski patrol arrives, of course). Knowing CPR and First Aid will also help me in the future when I have children. Learning these skills now will give me confidence to heal/help my children when they are ill or get injured.

     

    What type of Survival Skills do you want to develop in 2014? 

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: skills, Survival, emergency preparedness, survival skills

  • How to teach preparedness to toddlers

    After a year of teaching 3-4 year olds as a Sunday school teacher, I’ve learned it’s hard to get toddlers to sit down and focus for even just 5 minutes! This makes the task of teaching emergency preparedness skills . . . Um, how should I say it . . . DIFFICULT.

    So should toddlers be taught about emergency preparedness? Can it even be done?

    Teaching toddlers emergency preparedness skills is not a lost cause. It can be done, but strategically through repetition and play.

    Repetition and Strategic Play

    According to the MetLife Foundation’s pamphlet, “The Power of Play,” toddlers need movement, action, and repetition to understand the world around them. Repetition “helps children know what to expect [and] gives them a sense of security and control over their world. It also helps them master new skills and boosts their self-confidence.”

    Since toddlers rely on routine to understand the world around them, teaching emergency skills through repetition may be the key to helping toddlers not only to prepare, but to feel more confident when an emergency hits.

    How do I Teach My Toddler Using Repetition and Strategic Play?

    Build Your Own Emergency Kit Activity

    Get a backpack for your 3 or4-year-old. Tell them “this is your emergency backpack” (have them repeat the phrase ‘emergency backpack’). Let them know the backpack is special and should be used only when an adult tells them to use it.

    1. Use FEMA’s disaster preparedness coloring book pgs.4-6 to discuss with your child what an “emergency” or natural disaster is.  Explain it in a way they can understand and not feel overwhelmed about. (See coloring page below)

    FEMA Disaster Preparedness Coloring page

    2. After going through the coloring page, tell your child that they need their special backpack when there’s an emergency.

     3. Have a pile of items (maybe 2-3 for now, you can put more in the next time you play) to put into the emergency kit. Pull one item out at a time. Ask the child to identify or guess what the item is and what they would use the item for. If they don’t know, help them.  Let them put it in the backpack.

    CAUTION: Many of the items will be similar to what they already use daily so it’s important to specify that these are special pull-ups or a special sippy cup that they only use when an adult tells them to get the emergency backpack. Repeat this point and ask/tell them the appropriate time to use each item.

     

    4. Talk with your child about things they’d want to have in an emergency to help them feel happy. You’ll want to include some of their favorite snacks and a blanket or toy in the emergency kit.

    CAUTION: You may not want to put toys or blankets your child is attached to into the bag at the moment but take note of these things so you can bring them or get duplicates to put in later.

     

    5. After you put all the items in the backpack, explain to your child that “we need to put this backpack in a place where we can grab it quickly for an emergency.” Help your child select a place to store the bag, close to the front door.  Make sure they understand to only get this special backpack out when they are told by an adult.

    6. Show the toddler you have a special backpack as well, stored in the same place, or if it isn’t, go move the backpack to the same place. Show them some of the items in your kit.

     

    This is an activity that you’ll want to do often. You can do it when it’s time to replace items or you can do it once every three months, reiterating the same ideas and principles about preparedness. Review the items that are already in the bag, put them back in, and add other things as needed.

     

    Check out the Insight Article, “Special Considerations for Emergency Kits” to help you decide what to include in your toddler’s kit.

    And while you’re at it, check out our other articles about prepping for kids and teens:

    Prepare Teens for Real-Life Disasters  Using Young Adult Fiction

    Survival Skills for Kids: Outdoor Survival Games

     

    Have you tried to teach your toddler about preparedness? What did you do? What suggestions do you have for other parents or caregivers?  Let us know in the comments.

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: skills, preparedness, family, emergency preparedness

  • Savannah Calls 9-1-1

    |1 COMMENT(S)

    Teaching children how and when to call 9-1-1 just might save your life

    You may remember our guest post from earlier this year about teaching young children how and when to call 9-1-1 (“Who They Gonna Call”). In the original article, found on babysittingjobs.com, the authors emphasize making sure your little people know their critical information (name, age, address) and what kind of circumstances really warrant an emergency call. It’s a helpful article and worth another look.

    A great example of these principles at work has gone viral. The video below shows the conversation between 5-year-old Savannah and a 9-1-1 dispatcher, after her father’s chest pains make it too difficult for him to speak.

    When instructing kids on 9-1-1 protocols, be sure they know to stay as calm as Savannah does. She speaks clearly, listens well, answers questions, and repeats the dispatcher’s questions to her dad verbatim—more than many of us might manage in a frightening situation! She also does a fantastic job of following directions, even when she first wants to do something else (the whole pajama issue is priceless!). It’s pretty standard for dispatchers to tell the caller to unlock a door for the EMTs and then stay close to the person in trouble, but if other circumstances necessitate more specific actions, kids need to listen calmly and do exactly what the dispatcher tells them to do.

    One of the best ways Savannah helps the professionals is by offering specific information readily. Not only can she give the dispatcher her name and age, but she describes the problem accurately and even gives him a heads-up about the family dog. A useful role-play might involve a parent acting out an emergency (heart attack, fainting, fall and injury) and having the child describe exactly what they see. Model a call, giving details of the victim’s situation (not breathing, not moving, can’t talk), then have kids take turns observing an accident and making pretend calls.

     

    If you need more ideas and resources for family 9-1-1 training, check out the links below.

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: skills, preparedness, family, 9-1-1, emergency preparedness

  • Six Survival Structures to Help you in a Disaster

    Having a practical survival structure option is crucial in an emergency. This is why the Dutch non-profit organization INDEX recently held a structural design contest (structural design refers to the creation of buildings, homes, furniture, etc.) that asked contestants to create structures that could meet the growing global challenges that we face daily—one of these challenges being natural disasters.

    INDEX’s mission is to find the best designers who can create structures to improve the quality of life and to make daily tasks easier for all people. Each year, INDEX holds one of the largest design contests in the world.

    The CNN article, “In the Middle of a Natural Disaster? These Designs will Help You” highlights six survival structure from INDEX’s 2013 contest—designs that pay particular attention to helping people alleviate the impact of natural disasters in their lives.

    According to CNN, these projects “include a broad range of devices designed to save lives by helping rescue workers or giving people caught up in the aftermath of a natural disaster a way to help themselves.”

    The most interesting survival structure to me was the “Eliodomestico”. Its  structure is similar to a water well system, but it has a “futuristic” twist. The “Eliodomestico” gathers and distills sea water using the power of the sun to make it clean and safe to drink.

    Check out how the Eliodomestico works by watching this video.

    The other designs range from thin skyscrapers used as housing for victims of natural disasters to inflatable rafts that can be used as furniture. Take a look at the other five designs that CNN highlights by checking out their article, “In the Middle of a Natural Disaster? These Designs will Help You”.

    How useful/functional do you think these structures would be in a flood, tornado, or tsunami? Let us know in the comments.

    --Angela

    Image Source: http://www.nominateforindexaward.com/Presentation/read/id=MTc0MQ==

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: warmth, skills, shelter, preparedness, Survival, emergency preparedness

  • How to Winterize your Home

    |1 COMMENT(S)

    Winterize your house before the storms hit

    The minute winter is over and the temperature creeps up above 40 degrees, I know exactly what I’m supposed to do. Spring cleaning? Bring it on. Paint touch-ups? Love it. Garden prep? Couldn’t start soon enough. But somehow I’m never as enthusiastic about my preparations for winter. Maybe it’s because I’m too wrapped up in Jingle Bells to think about the important, practical things (like my house making it through the stormy season). So this year, I’m mending my ways. Amid all my plans for caroling and drinking eggnog, I hereby commit to winterize my home. You all heard me, right? Somebody’s got to hold me to it…

    If you’re in a similar situation, there are plenty of places to look for good tips and checklists. I’ve listed some of the best at the end of the post, but most of the advice shakes down into these three basic categories:

    1. Energy efficiency

    In most parts of the country, winter is the season of skyrocketing utility bills, as we pay to heat our rooms, our water, and our toes. Reduce costs by checking the basics first: open heat vents, make sure your insulation is up to snuff, and check doors and windows for heat leaks—a little caulking or a weather strip is far cheaper than the fuel it takes to raise your home’s temperature those few, critical degrees! Another clever trick I found is to reverse the direction of your ceiling fans, if you have them, pushing the heated air downward and keeping the room warmer.

    2. Seasonal use items

    Winter means putting certain things away and pulling out others that haven’t seen the light of day in nine months. Make sure the former are stored properly and the latter are in good repair for winter use. For example, drain lawnmowers and weed-eaters of gasoline to keep the engines from gumming up in the cold. Remove window-unit air conditioners, or winterize central AC units by draining water pipes and covering the unit with plastic.

    Before the weather turns really nasty, have the chimney cleaned and/or the furnace serviced. Stock up on your supply of firewood or pellets, if you use a traditional fireplace or wood stove. And make sure snow shovels, ice scrapers, and snow blowers are all functional and accessible.

    3. Storm and cold prep

    Winter weather can be pretty brutal on your home and property. You can’t anticipate everything, but you can prepare. Here are some common problems and troubleshooting tips.

    Heavy rain or snow – Clean gutters and unclog downspouts. Gutters weighty with debris and water can pull away from the siding or (worse) leak into the house. Similarly, replace worn shingles on the roof before you have to fix a leak.

    Ice – Drain sprinklers and hoses, insulate outdoor faucets, and turn off the outdoor water supply to prevent frozen or cracked exterior pipes. Keep sand, salt, or ice melt on hand to keep porch steps and walkways safe in freezing temperatures.

    Wind – Check trees close to your house for rot or overhanging branches that could come off in a windstorm (or heavy snow). Cover and store patio furniture and stash pots and planters in the shed or garage.

    Most of all, don’t forget your emergency kits! Double check your supply of candles and blankets, in case of power outages, or invest in a Yeti Solar Generator to keep the basics powered in case of a blackout. Make sure you have the needed supplies to help you weather any storm.

    Don't forget to Winterize your Car too! Check out these links for handy checklists, and stay safe and warm this winter!

    http://www.realestate.com/advice/a-checklist-for-winterizing-and-weatherproofing-your-home-66175/

    http://www.isciencetimes.com/articles/3899/20121015/winterizing-home-60-tip-checklist-saving-energy.htm

    http://www.bobvila.com/articles/502-winter-preparation-checklist/

    http://www.doityourself.com/stry/winter-home-checklist#b

    http://www.artofmanliness.com/2010/11/09/15-ways-to-winterize-your-home/

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: skills, Winter, preparedness, family, emergency preparedness, winterize, house

  • How to Winterize your Car

    Winterize your car before the storms hit

    Winter is coming: the sparkling snowfalls, the unexpected storms, the chilly nights. Are you ready? Amidst the rest of your holiday planning, don’t forget to prep your car. Vans, trucks, cars, and SUVs all handle the winter weather differently, but there are five universal parts of your vehicle that you should winterize before the weather turns:

    Brakes

    Before a storm comes your way, get a standard inspection of your brake pads and brake fluid to make sure they’re working properly. Remember to give yourself extra room to brake during bad weather. If you don’t have anti-lock brakes, then it’s better to pump your brakes when trying to stop to avoid spinning.

    Tires

    Cold weather means less air pressure in your tires. Make sure to refill your tires as the pressure decreases to enhance their performance and your gas mileage. Also, it’s a good idea to fill your spare tire, just in case you need it during a particularly crazy storm. According to TireRack.com, “Proper tire inflation pressure . . . stabilizes the tire's structure, blending the tire's responsiveness, traction and handling.” Underinflated tires can lead to loss of steering accuracy and stability, and even tire failure.  For those of you who are living in a new area, check with the locals to see if you should be carrying snow chains with you (I’m lookin' at you, North Dakota).

    Well-worn tires can also pose a threat in the wintertime. Your tire’s traction is all that stands between you and an accident. If the tread depth of your tires is worn away, make sure to either buy new tires, snow tires, or get your “balded” tires siped.

    Engine

    You can easily have your engine and anti-freeze checked at any car stop. Just make sure you don’t replace your anti-freeze with water! As temperatures decrease, the water will freeze, expand, and crack your engine.

    Windshield Wipers

    As relentless winter storms blow around you (especially if you live in areas that get snow), your wipers are what stand between you and seeing the road. Make sure your wiper blades are relatively new and that the wiper fluid is filled. Don’t use water, though. If the temperatures get too low, the water will freeze on your windshield and then you have a whole new set of problems.

    Headlights & Brake Lights

    Lastly, get your headlights and brake lights checked. If you can’t see, and more importantly if others can’t see you, then you’re just asking for trouble. Get your headlights aimed properly—keeping your low lights aimed low to reduce glare from storms (if you live in an area that gets snow).

     

    Finally, just in case something does happen this winter, don't forget your Emergency Car Kit, or your Auto Tool Kit and toolbox.

    It goes without saying that the best way to winterize your car is to keep up on your regular maintenance checks (but we are going to say it anyway). These checks will keep your vehicle in prime condition no matter what time of year it is. Now that you’re all set to brave the winter weather on the road, good luck with your other winter prepping!

    -Kimberly

     

     

    Sources:

    http://autorepair.about.com/od/regularmaintenance/a/winterchecklist.htm

    http://www.uvureview.com/2012/11/12/how-to-winterize-your-car/

    http://www.environmentalgraffiti.com/travel/news-10-easy-steps-winter-reay-car-and-you

    http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=1

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: skills, Winter, prepared, preparedness, emergency kit, Survival

  • Know your Avalanche Safety

    With winter sprinting towards us, all sorts of backcountry activities race to the front of our minds—skiing, sledding, snowshoeing . . . Although sparkling, fresh snow presents a gorgeous landscape, it can also lead to destructive (and deadly) avalanches.

    “When it comes to avalanche safety, the statistics are grim. Skiers and snowmobilers are the most likely to suffer an avalanche fatality. The odds of survival, if you get completely buried, are less than 30%. After 15 minutes, your chances of rescue drop significantly.”

    Check out our Insight Article Avalanche Safety to learn of three crucial avalanche safety “tools” you can’t carry with you, but that you’ll need in the great outdoors.

    Love winter outings and snow-filled fun? Check out these additional articles for tips to keep you prepared and safe:

    Winter Camping (and Other Signs of Insanity)

    http://beprepared.com/blog/10584/winter-camping-and-other-signs-of-insanity/

    Staying Warm in the Outdoors

    http://beprepared.com/insight/7142/staying-warm-in-the-outdoors/

     

    Kim

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: skills, Winter, preparedness, Survival, emergency preparedness, natural disaster, avalanche safety, avalanche

  • Looking for a unique DIY present? Why not give the gift of soft, sweet-smelling laundry all year long . . . (and no, we unfortunately don’t sell a laundry-scented 100-hour candle . . .)

    Last summer, we wrote a post about how to make DIY Laundry Detergent, so we decided that we needed to make something for your dryer, too. DIY Felted Wool Dryer Balls are a great present to give to your family, friends, and neighbors. I think they’re meaningful gifts and something that is useful to everyone.

    DIY Felted Wool Dryer Balls

    The benefits of DIY Felted Wool Dryer Balls

    • They reduce your drying time
    • They are free of chemicals often found in store bought dryer sheets
    • They reduce allergic reactions because they don’t include fragrances or chemicals
    • They fluff your laundry and reduce static cling
    • They are inexpensive to make (It only cost me $5.49 for the yarn. I already had the other supplies around my house)

    What You’ll Need

    • 100% Wool Yarn (not labeled ‘superwash’ or ‘machine washable’)—I found my wool yarn at Hobby Lobby. The brand was called “I Love this Wool.” Check your local craft store’s website for 100% wool yarn before making a trip there.
    • Scissors
    • A pair of old pantyhose
    • A blunt-tipped needle or crochet hook (a pen cap or tooth pick would work as well)
    • A little string or acrylic yarn (optional)
    • Essential Oil (optional)

    How You Make it

    1. Wrap a strand of wool yarn around the index and middle fingers of your non-dominant hand about 20 times. Pinch the wrapped yarn in the middle and pull it off your fingers. Wrap 4 or 5 loops of yarn around the center of this bundle to hold it securely. Using the bundle as the center of your ball, continue wrapping yarn around it in different directions, turning to achieve a fairly-tight ball shape. Continue until the ball is at least the size of a tennis ball.
    2. Use a blunt-tipped needle or crochet hook to tuck the end of your yarn under several layers of wrapped yarn until you can no longer see the end. Repeat the process described in steps 1 and 2 until you have 5 or 6 balls.
    3. Cut one leg off of an old pair of pantyhose (or use a knee -high stocking). Put one ball into the toe of the stocking, followed by the other dryer balls. Use the little string or acrylic yarn to section off each ball from one another (or just put one ball in the stocking at a time and tied a knot between them with the pantyhose). Tie off the open end of the stocking so that you have a “yarn-ball caterpillar.” Make sure you tie them tight! You don’t want them coming out in the washing machine.
    4. Throw the “yarn-ball caterpillar” into the washing machine with a load of whites or towels in hot water to begin the felting process. Then throw the caterpillar into the dryer.  You will want to wash and dry the caterpillar at least 2-4 times so that the yarn will felt and won’t come apart.
    5. Remove the dryer balls from the stocking. Then toss the balls into your dryer with a load of wet laundry. If you’d like, you can add 2-3 drops of your favorite essential oil to the balls to scent your laundry as they work.

    How do they work?

    For each load of laundry, the dryer balls will bounce around in the machine, separating your clothes, and allowing more hot air to circulate through the clothes. This excess air will allow your clothes to dry faster and the tumbling dryer balls will help to make the laundry soft and decrease wrinkles as they hit the clothes.

    How long will they last?

    This is the biggest question I had while making my own dryer balls: How long will they last? I scoured the internet for an answer to this question. The common consensus seemed to be 5 to 8+ years—they’ll last you for quite some time. However, if you use Essential oils, you’ll need to re-apply them regularly to the dryer balls to infuse that scent into your laundry.

    Wrap Em’ Up!

    These DIY Felted Wool Dryer Balls would be an excellent present because they are the gift that keeps on giving throughout the year (and beyond!)

    Place your wool Balls into a small wrapped basket or box and include a batch of our Emergency Essentials DIY Laundry Detergent to make a complete present. You can even leave a little note explaining how to use the dryer balls and what their purpose and benefits are.

    -Angela

    P.S. Speaking of laundry . . . top off your present with a Mobile Washer (hand operated washing machine). The Mobile Washer is perfect for washing clothes during a power outage or on a camping trip. All you need is a bucket, a little bit of your DIY Laundry Detergent, and a little bit of muscle to get your clothes clean. Check out how the Mobile Washer works in the video below.

     

    Sources:

    http://erinslittlesecrets.blogspot.com/2012/05/homestead-challenge-3-making-felted.html

    http://bodyunburdened.com/diy-wool-dryer-balls-natural-fabric-softener/

    http://www.diynatural.com/how-to-make-wool-dryer-balls/

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: skills, gifts, baby steps, DIY

  • Winter Camping Tips

    For some of us, winter brings a whole new set of adventures that summer just can’t offer. Some ski or snowboard, others snowshoe, and still others love to sled. For many outdoor enthusiasts, winter camping sparks their excitement; they see it as an adventure and a challenge. One of our bloggers, Stacey, says that her “own husband is one of these lunatics enthusiasts who believes that unless there’s 18 inches of snow on the ground, it’s not a real campout.”

    Whether you ski, snowshoe, sled, or go winter camping, it’s important to know what supplies you need for the weather you may face.  In her Insight Article, Stacey focuses on tips that every winter camper should know before heading out the door.

    For more information on how you can stay safe and happy while enjoying your frosty adventure this winter, check out Stacey’s Top Ten Tips for Winter Camping Insight Article.

    To get yourself totally prepped for this winter season (especially those of you who plan to be out in the cold), check out these other articles:

    “First Aid for Hypothermia and Frostbite”

    http://beprepared.com/blog/8804/first-aid-for-hypothermia-and-frostbite/

    “Emergency Shelter”

    http://beprepared.com/insight/7136/emergency-shelter-2/

    “Staying Warm in the Outdoors”

    http://beprepared.com/insight/7142/staying-warm-in-the-outdoors/

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: skills, preparedness, camping, Survival, emergency preparedness, winter camping

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