Tag Archives: skills

  • Six Survival Structures to Help you in a Disaster

    Having a practical survival structure option is crucial in an emergency. This is why the Dutch non-profit organization INDEX recently held a structural design contest (structural design refers to the creation of buildings, homes, furniture, etc.) that asked contestants to create structures that could meet the growing global challenges that we face daily—one of these challenges being natural disasters.

    INDEX’s mission is to find the best designers who can create structures to improve the quality of life and to make daily tasks easier for all people. Each year, INDEX holds one of the largest design contests in the world.

    The CNN article, “In the Middle of a Natural Disaster? These Designs will Help You” highlights six survival structure from INDEX’s 2013 contest—designs that pay particular attention to helping people alleviate the impact of natural disasters in their lives.

    According to CNN, these projects “include a broad range of devices designed to save lives by helping rescue workers or giving people caught up in the aftermath of a natural disaster a way to help themselves.”

    The most interesting survival structure to me was the “Eliodomestico”. Its  structure is similar to a water well system, but it has a “futuristic” twist. The “Eliodomestico” gathers and distills sea water using the power of the sun to make it clean and safe to drink.

    Check out how the Eliodomestico works by watching this video.

    The other designs range from thin skyscrapers used as housing for victims of natural disasters to inflatable rafts that can be used as furniture. Take a look at the other five designs that CNN highlights by checking out their article, “In the Middle of a Natural Disaster? These Designs will Help You”.

    How useful/functional do you think these structures would be in a flood, tornado, or tsunami? Let us know in the comments.

    --Angela

    Image Source: http://www.nominateforindexaward.com/Presentation/read/id=MTc0MQ==

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: warmth, skills, shelter, preparedness, Survival, emergency preparedness

  • How to Winterize your Home

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    Winterize your house before the storms hit

    The minute winter is over and the temperature creeps up above 40 degrees, I know exactly what I’m supposed to do. Spring cleaning? Bring it on. Paint touch-ups? Love it. Garden prep? Couldn’t start soon enough. But somehow I’m never as enthusiastic about my preparations for winter. Maybe it’s because I’m too wrapped up in Jingle Bells to think about the important, practical things (like my house making it through the stormy season). So this year, I’m mending my ways. Amid all my plans for caroling and drinking eggnog, I hereby commit to winterize my home. You all heard me, right? Somebody’s got to hold me to it…

    If you’re in a similar situation, there are plenty of places to look for good tips and checklists. I’ve listed some of the best at the end of the post, but most of the advice shakes down into these three basic categories:

    1. Energy efficiency

    In most parts of the country, winter is the season of skyrocketing utility bills, as we pay to heat our rooms, our water, and our toes. Reduce costs by checking the basics first: open heat vents, make sure your insulation is up to snuff, and check doors and windows for heat leaks—a little caulking or a weather strip is far cheaper than the fuel it takes to raise your home’s temperature those few, critical degrees! Another clever trick I found is to reverse the direction of your ceiling fans, if you have them, pushing the heated air downward and keeping the room warmer.

    2. Seasonal use items

    Winter means putting certain things away and pulling out others that haven’t seen the light of day in nine months. Make sure the former are stored properly and the latter are in good repair for winter use. For example, drain lawnmowers and weed-eaters of gasoline to keep the engines from gumming up in the cold. Remove window-unit air conditioners, or winterize central AC units by draining water pipes and covering the unit with plastic.

    Before the weather turns really nasty, have the chimney cleaned and/or the furnace serviced. Stock up on your supply of firewood or pellets, if you use a traditional fireplace or wood stove. And make sure snow shovels, ice scrapers, and snow blowers are all functional and accessible.

    3. Storm and cold prep

    Winter weather can be pretty brutal on your home and property. You can’t anticipate everything, but you can prepare. Here are some common problems and troubleshooting tips.

    Heavy rain or snow – Clean gutters and unclog downspouts. Gutters weighty with debris and water can pull away from the siding or (worse) leak into the house. Similarly, replace worn shingles on the roof before you have to fix a leak.

    Ice – Drain sprinklers and hoses, insulate outdoor faucets, and turn off the outdoor water supply to prevent frozen or cracked exterior pipes. Keep sand, salt, or ice melt on hand to keep porch steps and walkways safe in freezing temperatures.

    Wind – Check trees close to your house for rot or overhanging branches that could come off in a windstorm (or heavy snow). Cover and store patio furniture and stash pots and planters in the shed or garage.

    Most of all, don’t forget your emergency kits! Double check your supply of candles and blankets, in case of power outages, or invest in a Yeti Solar Generator to keep the basics powered in case of a blackout. Make sure you have the needed supplies to help you weather any storm.

    Don't forget to Winterize your Car too! Check out these links for handy checklists, and stay safe and warm this winter!

    http://www.realestate.com/advice/a-checklist-for-winterizing-and-weatherproofing-your-home-66175/

    http://www.isciencetimes.com/articles/3899/20121015/winterizing-home-60-tip-checklist-saving-energy.htm

    http://www.bobvila.com/articles/502-winter-preparation-checklist/

    http://www.doityourself.com/stry/winter-home-checklist#b

    http://www.artofmanliness.com/2010/11/09/15-ways-to-winterize-your-home/

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: skills, Winter, preparedness, family, emergency preparedness, winterize, house

  • How to Winterize your Car

    Winterize your car before the storms hit

    Winter is coming: the sparkling snowfalls, the unexpected storms, the chilly nights. Are you ready? Amidst the rest of your holiday planning, don’t forget to prep your car. Vans, trucks, cars, and SUVs all handle the winter weather differently, but there are five universal parts of your vehicle that you should winterize before the weather turns:

    Brakes

    Before a storm comes your way, get a standard inspection of your brake pads and brake fluid to make sure they’re working properly. Remember to give yourself extra room to brake during bad weather. If you don’t have anti-lock brakes, then it’s better to pump your brakes when trying to stop to avoid spinning.

    Tires

    Cold weather means less air pressure in your tires. Make sure to refill your tires as the pressure decreases to enhance their performance and your gas mileage. Also, it’s a good idea to fill your spare tire, just in case you need it during a particularly crazy storm. According to TireRack.com, “Proper tire inflation pressure . . . stabilizes the tire's structure, blending the tire's responsiveness, traction and handling.” Underinflated tires can lead to loss of steering accuracy and stability, and even tire failure.  For those of you who are living in a new area, check with the locals to see if you should be carrying snow chains with you (I’m lookin' at you, North Dakota).

    Well-worn tires can also pose a threat in the wintertime. Your tire’s traction is all that stands between you and an accident. If the tread depth of your tires is worn away, make sure to either buy new tires, snow tires, or get your “balded” tires siped.

    Engine

    You can easily have your engine and anti-freeze checked at any car stop. Just make sure you don’t replace your anti-freeze with water! As temperatures decrease, the water will freeze, expand, and crack your engine.

    Windshield Wipers

    As relentless winter storms blow around you (especially if you live in areas that get snow), your wipers are what stand between you and seeing the road. Make sure your wiper blades are relatively new and that the wiper fluid is filled. Don’t use water, though. If the temperatures get too low, the water will freeze on your windshield and then you have a whole new set of problems.

    Headlights & Brake Lights

    Lastly, get your headlights and brake lights checked. If you can’t see, and more importantly if others can’t see you, then you’re just asking for trouble. Get your headlights aimed properly—keeping your low lights aimed low to reduce glare from storms (if you live in an area that gets snow).

     

    Finally, just in case something does happen this winter, don't forget your Emergency Car Kit, or your Auto Tool Kit and toolbox.

    It goes without saying that the best way to winterize your car is to keep up on your regular maintenance checks (but we are going to say it anyway). These checks will keep your vehicle in prime condition no matter what time of year it is. Now that you’re all set to brave the winter weather on the road, good luck with your other winter prepping!

    -Kimberly

     

     

    Sources:

    http://autorepair.about.com/od/regularmaintenance/a/winterchecklist.htm

    http://www.uvureview.com/2012/11/12/how-to-winterize-your-car/

    http://www.environmentalgraffiti.com/travel/news-10-easy-steps-winter-reay-car-and-you

    http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=1

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: skills, Winter, prepared, preparedness, emergency kit, Survival

  • Know your Avalanche Safety

    With winter sprinting towards us, all sorts of backcountry activities race to the front of our minds—skiing, sledding, snowshoeing . . . Although sparkling, fresh snow presents a gorgeous landscape, it can also lead to destructive (and deadly) avalanches.

    “When it comes to avalanche safety, the statistics are grim. Skiers and snowmobilers are the most likely to suffer an avalanche fatality. The odds of survival, if you get completely buried, are less than 30%. After 15 minutes, your chances of rescue drop significantly.”

    Check out our Insight Article Avalanche Safety to learn of three crucial avalanche safety “tools” you can’t carry with you, but that you’ll need in the great outdoors.

    Love winter outings and snow-filled fun? Check out these additional articles for tips to keep you prepared and safe:

    Winter Camping (and Other Signs of Insanity)

    http://beprepared.com/blog/10584/winter-camping-and-other-signs-of-insanity/

    Staying Warm in the Outdoors

    http://beprepared.com/insight/7142/staying-warm-in-the-outdoors/

     

    Kim

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: skills, Winter, preparedness, Survival, emergency preparedness, natural disaster, avalanche safety, avalanche

  • Looking for a unique DIY present? Why not give the gift of soft, sweet-smelling laundry all year long . . . (and no, we unfortunately don’t sell a laundry-scented 100-hour candle . . .)

    Last summer, we wrote a post about how to make DIY Laundry Detergent, so we decided that we needed to make something for your dryer, too. DIY Felted Wool Dryer Balls are a great present to give to your family, friends, and neighbors. I think they’re meaningful gifts and something that is useful to everyone.

    DIY Felted Wool Dryer Balls

    The benefits of DIY Felted Wool Dryer Balls

    • They reduce your drying time
    • They are free of chemicals often found in store bought dryer sheets
    • They reduce allergic reactions because they don’t include fragrances or chemicals
    • They fluff your laundry and reduce static cling
    • They are inexpensive to make (It only cost me $5.49 for the yarn. I already had the other supplies around my house)

    What You’ll Need

    • 100% Wool Yarn (not labeled ‘superwash’ or ‘machine washable’)—I found my wool yarn at Hobby Lobby. The brand was called “I Love this Wool.” Check your local craft store’s website for 100% wool yarn before making a trip there.
    • Scissors
    • A pair of old pantyhose
    • A blunt-tipped needle or crochet hook (a pen cap or tooth pick would work as well)
    • A little string or acrylic yarn (optional)
    • Essential Oil (optional)

    How You Make it

    1. Wrap a strand of wool yarn around the index and middle fingers of your non-dominant hand about 20 times. Pinch the wrapped yarn in the middle and pull it off your fingers. Wrap 4 or 5 loops of yarn around the center of this bundle to hold it securely. Using the bundle as the center of your ball, continue wrapping yarn around it in different directions, turning to achieve a fairly-tight ball shape. Continue until the ball is at least the size of a tennis ball.
    2. Use a blunt-tipped needle or crochet hook to tuck the end of your yarn under several layers of wrapped yarn until you can no longer see the end. Repeat the process described in steps 1 and 2 until you have 5 or 6 balls.
    3. Cut one leg off of an old pair of pantyhose (or use a knee -high stocking). Put one ball into the toe of the stocking, followed by the other dryer balls. Use the little string or acrylic yarn to section off each ball from one another (or just put one ball in the stocking at a time and tied a knot between them with the pantyhose). Tie off the open end of the stocking so that you have a “yarn-ball caterpillar.” Make sure you tie them tight! You don’t want them coming out in the washing machine.
    4. Throw the “yarn-ball caterpillar” into the washing machine with a load of whites or towels in hot water to begin the felting process. Then throw the caterpillar into the dryer.  You will want to wash and dry the caterpillar at least 2-4 times so that the yarn will felt and won’t come apart.
    5. Remove the dryer balls from the stocking. Then toss the balls into your dryer with a load of wet laundry. If you’d like, you can add 2-3 drops of your favorite essential oil to the balls to scent your laundry as they work.

    How do they work?

    For each load of laundry, the dryer balls will bounce around in the machine, separating your clothes, and allowing more hot air to circulate through the clothes. This excess air will allow your clothes to dry faster and the tumbling dryer balls will help to make the laundry soft and decrease wrinkles as they hit the clothes.

    How long will they last?

    This is the biggest question I had while making my own dryer balls: How long will they last? I scoured the internet for an answer to this question. The common consensus seemed to be 5 to 8+ years—they’ll last you for quite some time. However, if you use Essential oils, you’ll need to re-apply them regularly to the dryer balls to infuse that scent into your laundry.

    Wrap Em’ Up!

    These DIY Felted Wool Dryer Balls would be an excellent present because they are the gift that keeps on giving throughout the year (and beyond!)

    Place your wool Balls into a small wrapped basket or box and include a batch of our Emergency Essentials DIY Laundry Detergent to make a complete present. You can even leave a little note explaining how to use the dryer balls and what their purpose and benefits are.

    -Angela

    P.S. Speaking of laundry . . . top off your present with a Mobile Washer (hand operated washing machine). The Mobile Washer is perfect for washing clothes during a power outage or on a camping trip. All you need is a bucket, a little bit of your DIY Laundry Detergent, and a little bit of muscle to get your clothes clean. Check out how the Mobile Washer works in the video below.

     

    Sources:

    http://erinslittlesecrets.blogspot.com/2012/05/homestead-challenge-3-making-felted.html

    http://bodyunburdened.com/diy-wool-dryer-balls-natural-fabric-softener/

    http://www.diynatural.com/how-to-make-wool-dryer-balls/

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: skills, gifts, baby steps, DIY

  • Winter Camping Tips

    For some of us, winter brings a whole new set of adventures that summer just can’t offer. Some ski or snowboard, others snowshoe, and still others love to sled. For many outdoor enthusiasts, winter camping sparks their excitement; they see it as an adventure and a challenge. One of our bloggers, Stacey, says that her “own husband is one of these lunatics enthusiasts who believes that unless there’s 18 inches of snow on the ground, it’s not a real campout.”

    Whether you ski, snowshoe, sled, or go winter camping, it’s important to know what supplies you need for the weather you may face.  In her Insight Article, Stacey focuses on tips that every winter camper should know before heading out the door.

    For more information on how you can stay safe and happy while enjoying your frosty adventure this winter, check out Stacey’s Top Ten Tips for Winter Camping Insight Article.

    To get yourself totally prepped for this winter season (especially those of you who plan to be out in the cold), check out these other articles:

    “First Aid for Hypothermia and Frostbite”

    http://beprepared.com/blog/8804/first-aid-for-hypothermia-and-frostbite/

    “Emergency Shelter”

    http://beprepared.com/insight/7136/emergency-shelter-2/

    “Staying Warm in the Outdoors”

    http://beprepared.com/insight/7142/staying-warm-in-the-outdoors/

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: skills, preparedness, camping, Survival, emergency preparedness, winter camping

  •  Drowning swimmer: 20 survival tips

    According to Popular Mechanics’s recent article, “How Not to Die: 20 Survival Tips You Must Know,” “accidents are the leading cause of death among U.S. men 18 to 50 years old.” What’s most surprising about this article is that many of the unintentional deaths described occurred while the victim was performing an everyday task like mowing the lawn, watching a live baseball game, or getting snacks from the vending machine!

    This article illustrates how easy it is to misinterpret or fail to register signals of imminent danger in various situations. So Popular Mechanics offers its readers signs to recognize these easy-to-miss risks and ways to avoid or survive them. Some of the risks that they talk about include things like electric-shock drowning, ATV accidents, effects of using generators incorrectly, and health-related issues like hypothermia and what can happen if you drink too much water!

    Check out more of the Popular Mechanics article, “How Not to Die: 20 Survival Tips You Must Know,” to learn how to protect yourself from unseen dangers.

     

    Also, to beef up your survival skills check out these articles:

    Preparedness Tips: Portable Generators Need Maintenance?!

    First Aid for Hypothermia and Frostbite

    The Real Signs of Drowning

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: skills, emergency preparedness, survival skills, danger, risks, avoiding risk, accidents

  • With Halloween over and Thanksgiving soon to arrive, before we know it Christmas will be here and those who start prepping for it now will have an easier, less stressful holiday season.

    The Christmas season is a time of parties, a stream of festivities, a never-ending row of colorful lights, and a lot of fun.  Start preparing now so that you can enjoy the winter wonderland that surrounds Christmastime without being overloaded and overstressed. One huge stressor during the holidays is trying to get gifts at the last minute—this is never a fun way to spend the few weeks before Christmas. Don’t wait until the last minute to figure out what gift you’re giving all of your friends, neighbors, and family members this year.

    Usually for Christmas we all seem to get the cookie platters, baked goods, or holiday decorations. Although these standard go-to gifts are fun (and for some of us, allow us to indulge in our weakness of candy!), why not step away from the crowd and give an inexpensive, unique gift to those you love most?

    My sister actually gave me a fantastic, delicious recipe that will both sweeten and spice up your friends’ holiday—Pepper Jelly.

    Small colorful sweet peppers isolated on white background

    Mmmm! Pepper jelly matches sweet with spicy in a delicious blend of flavors using bell peppers, jalapenos, and a few other ingredients. This recipe is easy to make in large batches, and only uses a few ingredients per batch, making it perfect for a holiday gift.

    Pepper Jelly

    Yield: 8 ½-pint jars

    *You could even do both colors (in separate jars) to create a Christmas season feel

    1. Combine peppers, vinegar, sugar, and cayenne in a large pot
    2. Cook on medium until it boils
    3. Add the Certo, boil 5 minutes (let it boil for the full 5 minutes, or it won’t set.)
    4. Remove from heat
    5. Add food color
    6. Pour into jars

    Pepper jelly is a unique recipe that a lot of people haven’t tasted before, but is savory nonetheless. If sweet and spicy aren’t quite your taste, other traditional jams and jellies make great holiday gifts as well. For a variety of delicious recipes see our Jams and Jellies that please post.

     

    Storing your Jam/Jelly

    Short-term storage is a great way to seal your jelly, protecting it from bacteria until you are ready to dive into it. There are three ways to package your jelly for short-term storage: Traditional Canning, Freezing, and Storing to eat.

    Traditional Canning

    Traditional canning involves cooking your ingredients before sealing them in their individual jars by processing your batch in a boiling water bath. This process takes longer to do because of the cooking time, but ensures that all of your ingredients are clean and ready to eat.  As soon as the jelly is poured into their individual jars, cap them and place in a boiling water bath for ten minutes.  Remove jars and set aside to cool. Soon after removing from the boiling water, you should hear a ‘pop!’ indicating that the jar has sealed itself. If you are unsure as to whether or not it sealed, just poke the lid. If it concaves and then bounces back at your touch, then it did not seal properly. In that case, store it in your fridge and eat within the next few weeks.  You can store traditionally canned jelly for up to a year.

    Freezing

    Freezing is another way to package your jelly for storage. This process takes much less time than the traditional canning method.  After the jelly has been poured into its individual freezer-safe containers, let it cool before capping it, and then place it in the freezer until you are ready to use it. Freezer jams can last up to a year in the freezer or a few weeks in the fridge.

    Store to Eat

    The last way to store your jelly is to store it to eat. Once you have poured the jelly into its individual jar and have let it cool, cap it and place it in the fridge. The recommended storage life is about a month, but I have had my Pepper Jelly in the fridge for two and it still tastes delicious. This type of storage is perfect if you plan to eat your scrumptious jelly right up.

     ***

    Jams and jellies are fantastic gifts to give anytime of the year because they’ll last. When you give jam as a gift, your friends can either break into the bottle immediately or save it for a time when their own sugary supply of holiday goodies gets low.  Jams and jellies are able to store for up to a year depending on how you seal it.

    Jams and jellies give you an inexpensive option when you want a unique, desirable gift for your loved ones. Freeze dried and dehydrated fruits and vegetables are perfect for adding into your jams/jellies without having to break your bank, just use a little here and a little there and still have plenty for later.

    -Kim

    Sources:

    http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_07/storing_jams.html

    http://www.betterrecipes.com/blogs/daily-dish/2011/07/27/how-to-make-homemade-jelly/

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: food storage, recipes, skills, baby steps, preparedness, Budget, freeze dried food, holiday

  • Gathering fire making supplies

    We’ve been talking a lot about fire lately—how to Build a Fire without Matches, how to Prevent Kitchen Fires, etc. Most of us have matches and maybe a lighter on our list of emergency supplies, but how many of us would have to scramble for everything else (you know, wood?) if we needed to get a fire going?  Here are some things you may not have on that list to help you gather fire making supplies.

    Tinder –Lots of different things can be used for tinder, and some are easier (and cleaner) to store than others. My personal favorite is dryer lint—I keep a jar in my laundry room and fill it regularly, then transfer it to a plastic ziplock for emergency packs. Discounting what you could find in the wild, here are some other easy tinder materials you could collect and store for your fire making supplies: wood shavings or sawdust, cotton fabric or cotton balls, frayed natural (jute) twine, char cloth, paper (Kleenex, toilet paper, newspaper, paper towel), or steel wool.

    Fire starters – You can’t go wrong with a supply of waterproof matches, like UCO Stormproof. Watch the video below to see UCO Stormproof matches in action.

     

    Some survivalists recommend keeping matches in a few different places (emergency pack, car, coat pocket), just in case. A less disposable idea might be getting a more durable fire starter and storing it with your fire making supplies. They won’t last indefinitely, but they’re good for anywhere from a hundred to a couple thousand sparks, depending on the material, and they store a little more conveniently than matches.

    Another way to get your fire started is using a gel fuel like Utility Flame. Simply squeeze the gel onto your tinder then light using a match or lighter. The gel will heat up and begin to burn your tinder, starting your flame. The gel burns for fifteen minutes, giving you enough time to collect kindling and fuel to keep the fire going. Utility Flame comes in handy little packets that are perfect for backpacks and emergency kits. 

    Fuel – For those of us who grew up without gas fireplaces (what do you mean, ‘switch it on’?), woodpiles were a part of life. They’re a rarer feature these days, but could be a lifesaver in an emergency. Whether you buy it by the cord or cut down your own tree branches and logs, there are important considerations regarding storage. Primarily, you want to keep firewood covered, but not enclosed; good ventilation is key to “seasoning,” or properly drying the wood.

    Alternatively, if you need to get and keep a fire burning somewhere away from your immaculately stacked woodpile, a firestarter like Fired Up! can save time and space. For fuel in bulk, Fired Up! comes in 12 oz. cans , 2.5 lb. cans, or 13 lb. buckets, and can store for 30+ years.

    First aid – So, maybe you got that fire burning just a little too hot. Don’t forget burn treatment along with all your other fire making supplies. BurnFree’s comprehensive line of burn treatment products includes everything from a fire blanket to treat full-body burns, to single dose packets of pain relief gel. Burnfree is specifically developed for first aid use on burns and scalds. By storing Burnfree in your camping or emergency supplies, you can begin to care for burns properly before it creates any devastating effects to your body. Burnfree allows you to treat burns in a variety of situations and of various degrees.

    Any other fire-related storage must-haves? What’s in your supply?

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: skills, baby steps, Survival, Fire Safety, Fire Preparedness

  • We're on Pinterest!

    Mom and daughter on Pinterest on laptop

    Did you know we’re on Pinterest? Oh, yeah, we’re hip like that. We even have pins of cute puppies and some ecards, just like everybody else. But you know what else we’re pinning? You don’t? Well, that’s because you haven’t checked us out yet. So, howzabout a little tour?

    For starters, our official Pinterest page can be found here: http://www.pinterest.com/emeressentials/.

    For those who don't know, Pinterest is a social media network that allows you to post pictures of products, crafts, or other neat ideas that you can test out at home. You post pictures on "boards" (see the pictures below) so that your followers can see what you're posting. At the moment we have 33 boards (we’ve got a lot on our mind) and more than a thousand followers. And we’re following some of you preparedness enthusiasts, which is really exciting. Here are a few highlights, but we’d love it if you jumped on Pinterest and looked around for yourself.

     

    Our favorite boards

    • Food Storage Recipes – Salmon burgers and fruit salsa? Egg drop soup and Superbowl party treats? Would you believe we can do all that with our food storage? From freeze dried goodies to solar cooking, this board will make rotation a pleasure and emergency eating a treat.

    Pinterest Food Storage Recipes board

    • Tutorials, Ideas and Plans – Our tireless researchers have scoured the Internet for instructions on just about everything you’d need to do, um, ever. Moldy tent? Tipnut.com has a step-by-step tutorial. Drowning buddy? Artofmanliness.com has an infographic. We’ve even pinned a youtube video on how to make a woven half-hitch paracord pouch. I know, right?!
    • Pet Preparedness – We always think about ourselves and children in our preparations, but what about Fido and Fluffy? Check here for tips, resources, and products to keep furry friends happy and healthy in case of an emergency.

    Pinterest Pet Preparedness board

    • No Room for Supplies?  – We’re particularly proud of this board. Do you have, or have you found, a creative idea for home storage? You know, like furniture with hidden compartments, rooms with false walls? Send us a link and it may show up here.
    • Do It Yourself Preparedness – You know we’re a sucker for DIY. Look here for ideas on how to make essentials like laundry soap, or fun kitchen organizers, like this one http://www.pinterest.com/pin/77898268528076372/.

     

    Why you should follow us

    • Preparedness Pantry Blog – Don’t get a chance to check our blog as often as you’d like? Most of our blog posts get pinned to this board. Follow us, and you’ll always know when there’s something new to check out.
    • My Emergency Binder – This board is a hidden treasure. Printables and downloads from our site are available here, along with good ideas for how to organize and store an emergency binder.

    Pinterest Emergency Binder Board

    • Giveaways and Contests  – Best board ever. Follow us on Pinterest, and opportunities to win freebies will pop up magically in your feed. It’s kind of like Christmas. And speaking of…

     

    CHRISTMAS IS COMING!

    (Pardon the all caps, but we’re really, really excited. In fact, we’re so excited that we’ve got five pinboards dedicated to Christmas shopping. It’s never too early, right?)

    • Gifts under $5 , 10 , 25, 50 – Just what they sound like, these boards provide lots of good ideas for Christmas gifts across a range of price points.
    • Stocking stuffers and small gifts – We really like the idea of loading up on little things. These would be perfect for kids’ stockings, a company or church gift exchange, or to have wrapped and on hand for last minute Christmas guests.

    Pinterest Stocking Stuffers board

    • Customer favorites – Still can’t think of anything to buy your family and friends for Christmas? Browse the 100+ plus pins on this board to see what our regulars buy on a usual basis.. There’s bound to be something to please that hard-to-buy-for type here.

    Doesn’t this get you all excited? And here’s one more super-cool thing you can do. Of course, you can repin any of the fun stuff you find on our pinboards. Or you can pin straight from our website! Yeah, you heard that right. Browse the good ol’ beprepared.com, find something fantastic, and hit the ‘pin’ button right on the page.

    Anything else we can do to make your life wonderful?

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: recipes, skills, gifts, preparedness, pet preparedness, emergency preparedness, pinterest

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