Tag Archives: skills

  • New York is faced with severe snowy and icy conditions this winter season

    Snow storms across the country are transforming daily life, but in New York, it’s not the actual storm that’s causing the problems.

    “This is not anything we didn’t expect,” Gov. Cuomo said. “We did have notice of this storm. The shortage of salt is a complicating factor.”

    So far this winter, downstate New York has been hit pretty hard with storm after storm, resulting in a severely depleted supply of road salt for New York City and Long Island.

    The Daily News reports storms surging across the eastern state, pounding upstate New York with snowfalls at a rate of one to two inches an hour, and covering downstate New York in freezing rain and ice.

    In some areas, a half-inch of ice has formed, creating slick paths and causing power outages where the ice has taken down tree limbs and power lines.

    To help with the conditions, the state is re-directing 3,500 tons of salt—130 truckloads worth—downstate to areas in need. In this state of emergency, New York has also put 1,700 plows on the roads and asked New Yorkers to stay home.

    Read the rest of the Daily News’ article “Gov. Cuomo Declares NY State of Emergency; Cites Road Salt Shortage Downstate"to learn more about the conditions in New York.

    As winter continues to bear down around us, prep yourself for the weather (and corresponding emergencies that come with it) in your area. Keeping your own supply of road salt, or even kitty litter, can help you get out of a slippery situation.

    If you haven’t already, it’s about time to winterize your grab-and-go bag and get ready for the unexpected, even if winter weather in your area doesn't seem likely. As the snow continues to fall, check out these winter driving tips that may save your life when you’re on the roads.

    Photo Courtesy of the Daily News

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: emergency power, skills, Winter, preparedness, Survival, emergency preparedness, New York

  • Protect yourself from sunburns and the life-threatening possibilities they can create

    Often when we think of burn injuries, our minds jump to fire burns, electrical burns, etc. But how many of us forget about “simple” sunburns? (Well, “simple” may be an understatement.)

    Although the sun doesn’t seem too dangerous shining from light years away (or during the cold months of winter), ultraviolet rays can cause serious skin damage. UV rays can damage your skin even on cloudy days, through haze, or through fog and often lead to painful sunburns. Research shows that sunburns can even develop into life-threatening skin cancer later in life.

    So what can you do to protect yourself?  The following tips are from The American Burn Association:

    Skin & eye protection:

    • Use liberal amounts of sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of at least 15, even on cloudy days. Wear dark sunglasses to protect your eyes (even if you wear contacts with UV protection).
    • Select shaded areas for outdoor activities, especially between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. when the sun’s UV rays are the strongest.
    • Wear a broad-brimmed hat, tightly woven clothing, and, where possible, a long-sleeved shirt (preferably cotton), and long pants when you spend long periods in the sun. If you’re wearing a baseball cap and plan to spend a lot of time outdoors, tuck a handkerchief under the back of the hat to prevent sunburn on your neck.
    • Avoid tanning altogether. There is no safe way to tan. Damage to your skin from the sun and tanning beds can happen in just minutes of exposure to UV light. Tanning beds typically emit mostly deeper penetrating UVA rays, but some do emit UVB rays (which cause sunburns), too.
    • Avoid using sunlamps
    • Understand your medications. Certain prescriptions can make your skin more sensitive to UV rays. Consult your doctor with any questions about your medications.
    • Infants have especially sensitive skin. And, unfortunately, they aren’t born with a skin protection system. They also can’t tell us if they are too hot or move on their own out of the sun, so it’s up to us to protect them.

    THE EMERGENCY ESSENTIALS DIFFERENCE

    We don't want to just mask the pain of a burn, we want to get rid of it! BurnFree® gives you instant burn relief by drawing the heat out of your skin.

    How to protect your baby’s skin:

    • Keep babies less than one years old out of direct sunlight to prevent skin damage and dehydration. Keep them in the shade under a tree, an umbrella, or a stroller canopy.
    • Dress your baby in protective but loose clothing that will cover their skin: long pants, long-sleeved shirt, and a wide-brimmed hat.
    • 15-30 minutes before going outside, apply PABA-free sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30,. Reapply every 2-3 hours, especially if children are playing in the water often. Do not apply sunscreen to babies under six months old.
    • Make sure children have a water break every 30 minutes when they’re exercising or playing outdoors in high heat and humidity. Be sure kids drink plenty of water before, during, and after outside activity. If shade is available, insist on breaks to cool off for a few minutes every once in awhile.
    • Don’t let infants or young children play or sleep in direct sun in a playpen, stroller, etc.

     

    Sunscreen Tips:

    When it comes to the sun, there are two types of UV rays that can harm your skin: UVB and UVA rays. UVB rays typically cause sunburns. UVA rays penetrate deeper into the skin and are associated with wrinkling, leathering, and other aspects of aging, not to mention skin cancer. It’s important to select the right type of sunscreen and to use it over and over again.

    • Use a sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15 (which blocks about 94% of UVB rays). Make sure to choose a sunscreen that has both UVA UVB protection.
    • Reapply ever 2-3 hours, as well as after swimming. No matter how strong the sunscreen is, it won’t last all day.
    • Pay special attention to exposed areas such as the face, neck, ears, back, shoulders, knees, and tops of feet
    • If applying multiple substances (i.e. bug repellant) on your skin, always put the sunscreen on first and wait 30 minutes before applying the other substances.
    • No sunscreen provides 100% protection. Even after applying sunscreen, cover up with a hat, long-sleeve shirt, and pants.

    Knowing how to keep yourself burn-free during the summer will allow you to enjoy the great outdoors without having to worry about treating an injury. If you do find yourself with a sun burn, don’t panic. Try using Sunburn Rescue or BurnFree. They help remove and evaporate the heat from your skin as well as provide some pain relief.

    Check out our article “First Aid for Burns” for more information about burn safety.

    --Kim

    Sources:

    http://www.webmd.com/beauty/sun/high-spf-sunscreens-are-they-better

    http://www.ameriburn.org/Preven/SummerSafetyEducator'sGuide.pdf

    http://www.skincancer.org/prevention/sun-protection/sunscreen/sunscreens-explained

    http://consults.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/06/03/is-there-such-a-thing-as-a-healthy-tan/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: skills, preparedness, emergency preparedness, Sunburn, National Burn Week, burns

  • Winter driving is a tricky skill to learn, but will be worth it in a storm

    Quite frankly, winter driving can be a pain in the neck.  The conditions can make the road dangerous and your car may not respond the way it does in warmer weather. On icy roads, everything takes longer to do safely—starting, stopping, and making turns. Here are some winter driving tips to help you stay safe on the road:

     

    Learn How to Drive Safely in Snow

      • Don’t pass snowplows or sanding trucks—even if they’re slow.
      • Don’t tailgate! Leave extra room between vehicles and avoid pulling right in front of another vehicle; the driver may not be able to brake quickly enough to let you in.
      • Do everything gently—do not over-steer, stomp your brakes, or try to accelerate quickly from a stop. Overreacting can easily send your car out of control.
      • Do not use cruise control in areas where an unexpected patch of ice might cause you to tap your brake; you could spin out of control. Never “pump” anti-lock brakes.
      • Swirling, blowing snow on the highway can be disorienting; slow down and watch for cars drifting into your lane. Turn on your low-beam lights so other drivers can see you. During daylight hours, polarized sunglasses may help you see better.

     

    Learn What to Do if You’re Stuck in Snow or Ice

      • If you get stuck in snow, don’t sit spinning your wheels—that just gets you in deeper. DO turn wheels from side to side if possible, use your emergency folding shovel to dig out around your tires, and pour kitty litter, sand, salt, or gravel in the path of the tires to give them traction. When you feel your tires beginning to catch, accelerate slowly to ease your vehicle out.
      • If you can’t get your car out, stay put, only getting out occasionally to clear snow from your tailpipe so that you can safely run your heater from time to time. Call for help and try to identify your location. Flares and reflective triangles may signal other drivers to help you—or at least avoid hitting you! A red cloth hanging out the driver’s window is a signal for help.
      • If the roads are icy, drive very slowly. It takes at least twice as long to stop on ice as on dry pavement—and a whopping nine times as long to stop on black ice as on dry pavement!
      • Bridges and overpasses ice up more quickly than regular roadways. Be aware that black ice (sometimes called “clear ice”) often just looks like wet pavement; it also lurks in tunnels or on roadways close to bodies of water.
      • NEVER assume that a front-wheel or all-wheel-drive vehicle can safely negotiate icy roads at normal speeds. Ice is no respecter of vehicles!

     

    We hope you get where you're going safe and sound—no matter what weather you may face on the roads.

     

    Also, don’t forget to store an emergency kit in your car. Check out our Insight articles, "Baby Steps: Time to Winterize your Grab and go Bag” and “How to Winterize your Car” for more winter safety and preparedness tips.

     

    Sources:

    www.ehow.com/way_5157139_safety-tips-winter-driving.html

    www.DMV.org

    www.osha.gov/Publication/SafeDriving.pdf

    www.weather.com/activities/driving/drivingsafety/drivingsafetytips/snow.html

    www.nhtsa.gov/staticfiles/nti/pdf/WinterDrivingTips2012

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: skills, Car Preparedness, Winter, preparedness, Survival, Winter driving

  • Prep yourself to survive winter so you can enjoy it all season long

    Whether we love it or hate it, winter’s here, bringing skiing, skating, snowboarding, snowman building and . . . shoveling, slipping, sliding, shivering, sneezing, and sniffling! Preparation is the key to surviving—even enjoying—the coldest time of the year.

    Update emergency kits

    We know that our homes, yards, wardrobes, and vehicles all need winterizing—but let’s not forget about our emergency kits, as well. It’s time to change out summer clothing for winter in our bug-out-bags, and to be sure we have hand warmers, winter tools, kitty litter or sand, antifreeze, and more in our emergency car kits. See “Baby Steps: Time to Winterize Your Grab and Go Bag” for more suggestions.

    Protect yourself against hypothermia

    Other than avoiding winter car accidents and falls on ice, protecting ourselves and our families against hypothermia and frostbite is the main focus of winter safety. Hypothermia is a dangerous condition that can creep up on us, making people first shiver, then feel sleepy, confused unaware of their own danger , and apathetic, with difficulty thinking and making rational decisions.

    A few basic tips protect against hypothermia:

    • Avoid getting wet (whether from sweat, rain, snow, or dew)

    • Make sure you are protected against wind chill

    • Go back inside or to a fire to warm up from time to time

    • Stop your activity before you reach an exhausted state

    Check out our Insight article "First Aid for Hypothermia and Frostbite" to learn more about how to protect yourself from this cold related issue.

    Protect yourself against Sickness

    Colds, the flu, and coughs are more prevalent in the winter. With an increase in illness at this time of year, it’s important to be sure we’re taking the proper steps to avoid getting sick.

    Eat your fruits and veggies. While some fresh fruits and vegetables may not be as readily available in winter as they are in summer, you can stock up on freeze dried varieties that you’ll love and will give you some of the nutrition you’ll need. Eat lots of green or yellow produce in the winter. Think pumpkin, winter squash, carrots, sweet potatoes, and dark green, leafy veggies like kale and spinach.

    Thankfully, winter is citrus season, so enjoy those tangerines, oranges, and grapefruits. They’re full of Vitamin C, bioflavonoids, and other nutrients that help to keep us healthy.

    Fight off Germs. Remember to wash your hands often with soap and good, warm water; sneeze or cough into a tissue or your elbow, not your bare hands or (heaven forbid!) the air around you! Germs are one thing you need to be selfish about keeping to yourself.

    Many germs can be transferred from up to 6 feet away. Even the tiniest droplet of moisture from a person with a cold or the flu can land in your mouth or nose, or be inhaled into your lungs when they cough, sneeze, or even speak. Try to stay away from those who are ill; if you’re ill, stay home.

    Germs can also be transferred from touching a surface or object that has the virus on it. Clean doorknobs, toys, and other frequently touched surfaces regularly.

    Layer up

    Dressing in layers gives the best protection against very cold weather. Here are a few tips for layering your clothes properly:

    • First have a thin layer of “wicking” fabric such as Under Armour™ that pulls moisture away from your skin.
    • Follow that with a warm layer such as a heavy shirt, jeans or insulated pants, and a sweater or jacket.
    • Top it all off with a reflective or waterproof layer.
    • Add appropriate gloves and footwear, including warm socks (wool socks are great) and perhaps face protection such as a ski mask in extreme conditions to protect your face from frostbite.

    Check out our Insight articles "Staying Warm in the Outdoors", "Emergency Warmth", and our blog post, "Winter Camping (and Other Signs of Insanity)" for more great tips on layering up.

    Learn to build a fire

    If you find yourself stranded outdoors in the cold for any length of time, your survival (and comfort) may depend on whether you can build—and maintain—a successful fire. Read "How to Build a Fire" and take the time to practice. (Believe me, these are techniques to know! Read the comments at the end, too.)

    Learn to build a shelter

    If you should ever have to construct a temporary shelter for yourself, you’ll appreciate knowing the information contained in our "Emergency Shelter" and Shelter and Temperature Control in an Emergency articles.

    Keep extra help on hand

    Marvelous aids such as hand and body warmers are also important, especially if you’re going to be outdoors for an extended period of time. Always keep some in your car, purse, or coat pocket so you’ll have them wherever you go.

    Be wise and prepare. Then if Jack Frost reaches his icy fingers for you, you’ll know how to defend yourself against him!

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: skills, Winter, preparedness, Survival, emergency preparedness, winter prep

  • National Burn Week is Feb. 2nd - Feb. 8th

    Did you know that cooking fires are the leading cause of house fires, followed closely by heating fires? Or that the leading factor contributing to clothes dryers catching fire failure to clean the dryer?

    House fires are more common than you think—and they can occur in countless ways all year round. To help educate the public on fire and burn safety, the American Burn Association (ABA) has declared Feb. 2nd - 8th National Burn Week.

    The ABA’s campaign is designed to help parents, educators, and community members learn—and teach others—about burn prevention and safety. They focus on teaching what types of situations present fire risks, how to recognize and prevent different types of burns (scalds, electrical, etc.), and other general fire safety tips.

    Understanding fire safety is an important skill to develop, because fires can happen anywhere. If you know what to do, then you can be a solution to the crisis.

    We’ll be back throughout the week with tips to expand your fire safety knowledge so you can stay safe and help prevent fires.

    We each have a part to play in fire prevention at home and in the great outdoors. What are you doing to live and teach fire safety? Do you know how to recognize and treat different types of burns?

    Sources:

    http://www.usfa.fema.gov/statistics/reports/electrical_and_appliances.shtm

    http://www.usfa.fema.gov/statistics/reports/heating.shtm

    http://www.ameriburn.org/preventionBurnAwareness.php

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: skills, disaster, preparedness, Survival, emergency preparedness, fires, National Burn Week, house fires

  • Roscoe Bartlett living off the grid

    If you live in the city, there are many luxuries to enjoy—power with the flick of a switch, grocery stores or shopping malls less than five minutes away, constant communication with everyone via cell phone, internet, or radio. So . . . could you ever find yourself living off the grid?

    After 20 years on Capitol Hill, Congressman Roscoe Bartlett has taken himself completely off the grid, retreating to a secluded property in West Virginia. We came across Politico Magazine’s article via Instapundit and, whether or not you agree with Bartlett’s political views, we think there are some interesting things he’s done as a prepper that make this article worth reading.

    Bartlett lives without a phone, without a link to outside power, and without municipal plumbing. He has developed quite a few skills that will help him if he gets into an emergency.

    For the past few decades, Bartlett spent his free time up at this property, prepping it for the day he’d go off the grid. He built five cabins by himself, then wired solar panels and ran pipes from freshwater springs to each cabin.

    Living completely off the grid, he rises at dawn six days a week in order to maintain his power sources, food, and way of life. He spends about 10 hours a day cutting logs, gardening, and doing other tasks around the land.

    “People ask me ‘Why?’” Bartlett said in an interview with Politico Magazine. “I ask people why you climb Mount Everest. It’s a challenge, and it’s challenging to think what life would be like if there weren’t any grid and there weren’t any grocery stores. That’s what life was like for our forefathers.”

    Read more of Roscoe Bartlett’s experience living off the grid (and why he chose to do so) in the Politico article, “The Congressman Who Went off the Grid

    What changes would you have to make to your lifestyle if you went completely off the grid? Would you do it?

    Photo Courtesy of Politico Magazine

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: emergency power, solar power, skills, Survival, emergency preparedness, off the grid

  • Each Monday in January, we’re sharing our Preparedness New Year’s Resolutions for 2014. If you’d like to make some Prepping Resolutions of your own, but don’t know where to start, borrow some of our resolutions or use this series to get some ideas.

    This week we are talking about Outdoor Gear. Click here to check out Last week’s resolutions for Indoor Gear.

    Here is what our Emergency Essentials’ bloggers plan on getting to take with them into the great outdoors in 2014.

    Prepper Style New Year's Resolutions: Outdoor Gear

     

    Prepper Style New Year’s Resolutions : Outdoor Gear

    Sharon

    I resolve to get some good fire-starting supplies, such as the nifty little Sparkie Fire Starter, a can of Fired Up!, and some Waterproof and Windproof Matches. This would make it so much easier to start a campfire or get the charcoal grill going quickly, especially in windy conditions.

    Sarah

    If you’ve followed the Pennies for Prepping series, you may know that I bought a bit of outdoor gear last fall, including the Teton Outfitter XXL 1-Man Quick Tent and a Klymit Static V sleeping pad. I already have a sleeping bag, but I’d like to get something warmer this year, ideally before I go winter camping—maybe to something like the High Unita Gear Sleepy Ridge 10-Degree Sleeping Bag. I also want to get an Optimus Vega canister stove. Because, if I’m going to get a canister stove, it might as well be one that will work during all four seasons.

    Angela

    My New Year’s Resolution for outdoor gear is to learn how to make awesome shelters for different situations. I want to read and research about different shelters and how you make them in the Sense of Survival. Then, I want to go and test it out with a few materials I already have on hand at home. I want to do this so I can figure out what items I would need to make a stellar, warm, and insulated shelter. So I already know that I really want a ripstop tarp or two, duct tape, and maybe a tent like the Mountainsmith Morrison Two-person Tent if I can’t figure out how to make a shelter from natural materials. . .

    Kim

    This year, I’m going to learn how to start (and extinguish) a campfire. To learn this new skill, I want to add fire starting tools to my family’s emergency kits and camping supplies. Our family loves to camp, but not knowing how to build a fire can ruin the adventure pretty quickly on a cold night.  We will be adding the Sparkie, Spark-Lite, and H-25 Strike Master fire starters to our kits. We want to have a variety of fire starters on hand to ensure that we have a reliable method of lighting a fire, no matter the situation. (What if I lose one? If that’s my one and only method of starting a fire, I’m in trouble). By the end of 2014, my family will be campfire starting (and extinguishing) experts!

     

    What’s Your Advice?

    If you had to survive in the outdoors, what else would you bring?

    This is our last week for New Year’s Resolutions.  Now, let’s see how many of them we can keep! Check back here to see how we are making progress on our goals in the coming months.

    Check out all the Prepper Style New Year’s Resolutions from the beginning of January on our blog.

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: skills, emergency kit, Survival, emergency preparedness

  • Each Monday in January, we’re sharing our Preparedness New Year’s Resolutions for 2014. If you’d like to make some Prepping Resolutions of your own, but don’t know where to start, borrow some of our resolutions or use this series to get some ideas.

    This week we're  talking about Survival Skills. Take a look at last week’s resolutions for Food and Water Storage.

    Prepper style New Year's Resolutions for Survival Skills

    Here is what our Emergency Essentials’ bloggers plan on doing to hone their Survival Skills in 2014:

    New Year’s Resolution Prepper Style: Survival Skills

    Sharon

    I resolve to experiment with and learn different alternative cooking skills, such as basic thermos cooking and one-pot meals on a Single Burner Folding Stove with a Heat Cell Canister. I hope to get a Volcano Collapsible Grill with an Oven Lid and learn to use it for both grilling and baking using the Volcano Dutch Oven. I also plan to continue learning how to grow vegetables successfully in pots. (Last summer’s results were mixed: the cucumbers and peppers were great, but the eggplants were so small I kept waiting for them to grow large enough to harvest while they were actually growing old!)

     

    Sarah

    You may or may not know that, growing up, I used to go camping and hiking with my family all the time. As I grew older, I kicked my inner tomboy to the curb and embraced the world of stilettos and manicures. This year I’m letting the pendulum swing back to middle ground and I’ll be spending some more time outdoors, practicing and learning some survival skills (like building a fire or a shelter, orienteering, etc.). I’m also going to do some canning and dehydrating this year, which will be a totally new experience for me. There are dozens of skills I want to learn, but I’m trying to pace myself, so the first thing I’m going to do is a winter camping trip where I’ll practice building an emergency shelter and a fire. (Wish me luck. But if you’re worried about me, also know that I’m absolutely taking a tent. And an armful of hand and body warmers.)

    Angela

    Sometimes my husband acts like he’s a “dead body” and tells me to try to carry him out of a “burning house” (yes, I know this is weird). It’s annoying when he does it, but I fail at dragging him even two feet every time. This makes me think that I need to strength train to be able to get him to safety if something happened. So my New Year’s Resolution for skills is to learn various methods for carrying another person, strength training (so that I can lift more than 30 pounds . . .), and exercising more in case we have to evacuate on foot, or build a shelter.

     

    Kim

    Once upon a time I was CPR and First Aid certified . . . that was like 6 ½ years ago. This New Year, I resolve to relearn (and get re-certified) in First Aid and CPR. I just hit my one year wedding anniversary this last December and it’s made me realize that I want to be able to be self-reliant in protecting my family, if it comes to that. My husband and I ski . . . a lot. By developing First Aid skills, I will be better prepared to take care of my husband if he gets hurt while we’re skiing (before ski patrol arrives, of course). Knowing CPR and First Aid will also help me in the future when I have children. Learning these skills now will give me confidence to heal/help my children when they are ill or get injured.

     

    What type of Survival Skills do you want to develop in 2014? 

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: skills, Survival, emergency preparedness, survival skills

  • How to teach preparedness to toddlers

    After a year of teaching 3-4 year olds as a Sunday school teacher, I’ve learned it’s hard to get toddlers to sit down and focus for even just 5 minutes! This makes the task of teaching emergency preparedness skills . . . Um, how should I say it . . . DIFFICULT.

    So should toddlers be taught about emergency preparedness? Can it even be done?

    Teaching toddlers emergency preparedness skills is not a lost cause. It can be done, but strategically through repetition and play.

    Repetition and Strategic Play

    According to the MetLife Foundation’s pamphlet, “The Power of Play,” toddlers need movement, action, and repetition to understand the world around them. Repetition “helps children know what to expect [and] gives them a sense of security and control over their world. It also helps them master new skills and boosts their self-confidence.”

    Since toddlers rely on routine to understand the world around them, teaching emergency skills through repetition may be the key to helping toddlers not only to prepare, but to feel more confident when an emergency hits.

    How do I Teach My Toddler Using Repetition and Strategic Play?

    Build Your Own Emergency Kit Activity

    Get a backpack for your 3 or4-year-old. Tell them “this is your emergency backpack” (have them repeat the phrase ‘emergency backpack’). Let them know the backpack is special and should be used only when an adult tells them to use it.

    1. Use FEMA’s disaster preparedness coloring book pgs.4-6 to discuss with your child what an “emergency” or natural disaster is.  Explain it in a way they can understand and not feel overwhelmed about. (See coloring page below)

    FEMA Disaster Preparedness Coloring page

    2. After going through the coloring page, tell your child that they need their special backpack when there’s an emergency.

     3. Have a pile of items (maybe 2-3 for now, you can put more in the next time you play) to put into the emergency kit. Pull one item out at a time. Ask the child to identify or guess what the item is and what they would use the item for. If they don’t know, help them.  Let them put it in the backpack.

    CAUTION: Many of the items will be similar to what they already use daily so it’s important to specify that these are special pull-ups or a special sippy cup that they only use when an adult tells them to get the emergency backpack. Repeat this point and ask/tell them the appropriate time to use each item.

     

    4. Talk with your child about things they’d want to have in an emergency to help them feel happy. You’ll want to include some of their favorite snacks and a blanket or toy in the emergency kit.

    CAUTION: You may not want to put toys or blankets your child is attached to into the bag at the moment but take note of these things so you can bring them or get duplicates to put in later.

     

    5. After you put all the items in the backpack, explain to your child that “we need to put this backpack in a place where we can grab it quickly for an emergency.” Help your child select a place to store the bag, close to the front door.  Make sure they understand to only get this special backpack out when they are told by an adult.

    6. Show the toddler you have a special backpack as well, stored in the same place, or if it isn’t, go move the backpack to the same place. Show them some of the items in your kit.

     

    This is an activity that you’ll want to do often. You can do it when it’s time to replace items or you can do it once every three months, reiterating the same ideas and principles about preparedness. Review the items that are already in the bag, put them back in, and add other things as needed.

     

    Check out the Insight Article, “Special Considerations for Emergency Kits” to help you decide what to include in your toddler’s kit.

    And while you’re at it, check out our other articles about prepping for kids and teens:

    Prepare Teens for Real-Life Disasters  Using Young Adult Fiction

    Survival Skills for Kids: Outdoor Survival Games

     

    Have you tried to teach your toddler about preparedness? What did you do? What suggestions do you have for other parents or caregivers?  Let us know in the comments.

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: skills, preparedness, family, emergency preparedness

  • Savannah Calls 9-1-1

    |1 COMMENT(S)

    Teaching children how and when to call 9-1-1 just might save your life

    You may remember our guest post from earlier this year about teaching young children how and when to call 9-1-1 (“Who They Gonna Call”). In the original article, found on babysittingjobs.com, the authors emphasize making sure your little people know their critical information (name, age, address) and what kind of circumstances really warrant an emergency call. It’s a helpful article and worth another look.

    A great example of these principles at work has gone viral. The video below shows the conversation between 5-year-old Savannah and a 9-1-1 dispatcher, after her father’s chest pains make it too difficult for him to speak.

    When instructing kids on 9-1-1 protocols, be sure they know to stay as calm as Savannah does. She speaks clearly, listens well, answers questions, and repeats the dispatcher’s questions to her dad verbatim—more than many of us might manage in a frightening situation! She also does a fantastic job of following directions, even when she first wants to do something else (the whole pajama issue is priceless!). It’s pretty standard for dispatchers to tell the caller to unlock a door for the EMTs and then stay close to the person in trouble, but if other circumstances necessitate more specific actions, kids need to listen calmly and do exactly what the dispatcher tells them to do.

    One of the best ways Savannah helps the professionals is by offering specific information readily. Not only can she give the dispatcher her name and age, but she describes the problem accurately and even gives him a heads-up about the family dog. A useful role-play might involve a parent acting out an emergency (heart attack, fainting, fall and injury) and having the child describe exactly what they see. Model a call, giving details of the victim’s situation (not breathing, not moving, can’t talk), then have kids take turns observing an accident and making pretend calls.

     

    If you need more ideas and resources for family 9-1-1 training, check out the links below.

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: skills, preparedness, family, 9-1-1, emergency preparedness

  1. 11-20 of 48 items