Tag Archives: shelter

  •  10 Must-Have Items for Camping

    When the weather warms and nighttime comes late, camping calls. Camping trips can provide a much-needed change of pace and change of scenery for families always wired in or on the go. But if you’re what you might call “indoorsy,” the thought of packing up food, clothing, warmth, and shelter so you can leave your home—with its ready access to food, clothing, warmth, and shelter—might sound daunting, no matter how idyllic it might sound to sleep under the Milky Way.

    Do not be daunted. With a few pieces of the right equipment, camping under the stars can be easy to arrange. And you and your family can be one step closer to living a life of comfort outside your comfort zone. Here are ten camping essentials that will help you finally make friends with the great outdoors.

    1. Water. Any outdoor experience will require you to be well hydrated, so easy access to water is key. Most maintained campgrounds provide clean water access for campers, but you’ll need containers to trek the water from wherever it is to where it needs to be. Water carriers vary from handheld water bottles (Emergency Essentials 32-oz yellow water bottle), to backpack containers (Blue Camelback Cloud Walker 70-oz Hydration Pack), to multi-gallon containers that can serve your whole family (Reliance 5-gallon Collapsible Fold-A-Carrier).

    10 Must-Have Items for Camping: The Reliance Fold N Filter

    2. Food. Camping families are hungry families, so high-quality, tasty food should be your priority. But outdoor living begs for simplicity. Look to easily prepared foods like the Emergency Essentials MREs and Mountain House meals for delicious breakfasts, lunches, dinners, and desserts.

    Here are some ideas:

    Breakfast: Serve up Mountain House Scrambled Eggs with Ham, Red, and Green Peppers with a side of Mountain House Granola with Blueberries and Milk for a warm, filling start to the day.

    Lunch: After a morning of walking, hiking, or fishing, your crew will be ready for a satisfying lunch. Try Mountain House Chicken Salad Wrap Filling with Multigrain Snack Bread for a hearty sandwich. Serve something like an Oatmeal Cookie for a post-lunch snack or dessert.

    Dinner: When camping, the evening meal is a time for friends and families to share the highlights of their days’ explorations, while settling them in for a night outdoors. Meals like Mountain House Beef Stroganoff with Noodles, MRE Italian Bread Sticks, and Mountain House Garden Green Peas will open mouths for food and conversation.

    Dessert: End the day with a sweet treat like Mountain House Raspberry Crumble or a MRE Fudge Brownie with Chocolate Chips, and you may find yourself dreaming of happy things, no matter what the temperature is outside.

    10 Must-Have Items for Camping: Mountain House Pouches

    3. Stove. Cooking over a campfire can be exciting and tasty, but bringing a portable stove, like the Stansport Propane Stove, will allow you to prepare a wider variety of foods with more predictability and less work (win, win, win), giving you more time to explore and enjoy (win, win!). (Quintuple win!)

    10 Must-Have Items for Camping: Stansport Stove

    4. Utensils. So easy to forget, but so helpful to have. A three-in-one set of sturdy utensils, like the Basic Chow Set, can be useful for prepping food, cooking food, and eating food. Take it from the sadly expert: sticks are not nearly as effective.

    5. Light and fire. A little light at night can transform a campsite from spooky to cozy. You can choose from a variety of portable light options, including personal gear like the Princeton Tec Quad 4 LED Headlamp (great for night reading in your tent or finding your toothpaste) or the High Uinta Gear Pathfinder 9 LED Flashlight, or community lights, like the Goal Zero Lighthouse 250 Lumen Rechargeable Lantern. If you’re going to light a fire, to roast marshmallows or to warm you up on a chilly night, then bring Fire Lighters, which are reliable, easy to light, and require little or no kindling.

    10 Must-Have Items for Camping: Fire Lighters

    6. Sleeping bag. Perhaps the most critical piece of equipment for a restful overnight excursion is a comfortable and warm sleeping bag. Bags like the Slumberjack Latitude Mummy Bags (available in regular, long, and for 0-degree Fahrenheit and 20-degree Fahrenheit weather) are designed for reliable coziness.

    7. Tarp. According to expert campers, a tarp is many times useful due to its versatility and water resistance. You can use it under your tent as ground cover. (Tip: A tarp used for this purpose should be a few inches shorter than the width and breadth of your tent, so any water dripping off your tent will absorb into the ground and not drop onto your tarp and slide toward your tent.) You can position it above your cooking, eating, or lounging area, to keep off rain or to limit sun exposure. And, if you’re really adventurous, you can erect it over your sleeping bag and gear and camp without a tent at all!

    8. Tent. If you’re inclined toward a more comfortable arrangement, a quality tent can provide you with protection from the elements (and mosquitoes!) and much-needed privacy. Mid-size tents, such as the Slumberjack Trail Tent 3, provide ample space for the gear and sleeping bags of three adults, while not being hard to erect or heavy to carry.

    10 Must-Have Items for Camping: Slubmerjack Trail Tent 3

    9. Toilet paper. When in need, campers can use certain leaves, pieces of clothing, or rocks (sandstone is not recommended), but you may find your bathroom experiences to be much less memorable if you remember to pack some good old-fashioned toilet paper. One roll can do wonders.

    10. Assorted plastic bags. Making friends with the outdoors means leaving it better than you found it, so remember to bring a few garbage bags, kitchen trash bags, and gallon-size zip-top bags, to store your empty cans, discarded wrappers, leftover food, and wet clothing. The right-sized plastic bag can help prevent a soggy, smelly end to an otherwise successful camping adventure.

    With these ten must-have items, your camping trip can be easy to arrange, happy to experience, and satisfying to remember. Go camping! The beautiful world is waiting.

     

    --Sarah Brinton

    What else do you consider a must-have item for camping? 

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: shelter, camping, outdoors

  • UPDATE: You asked, and we listened. The All-in-Four 4-Person Emergency Supply is now available!

    A little while ago we learned about the Life Cube—an all-inclusive, inflatable shelter stocked with the necessary food, water, and gear to help a person survive the few days after a natural disaster occurs. The Life Cube, which weighs between 950-1100 lbs., is ideal to be airdropped into areas suffering from catastrophic events. However, although it is a great idea for mass emergencies and agency use, the Life Cube currently costs anywhere from $5,000 to $15,000. For many looking to add an all-inclusive, portable shelter to their emergency gear, this may be a little out of their price range.

    We were inspired by the Life Cube to create our own all-in-one portable shelter kit. Rather than focusing on agency use, however, our portable shelter kit focuses more on a personal/family level, only weighing about 71 lbs. and costing approximately $762. Here at Emergency Essentials, we have configured a list of items that would work as a basic all-in-one (or in our case, all-in-four) portable shelter. The all-in-four portable shelter consists of four bags with essential supplies divided among them. These items not only give you shelter, food, and water, but other basic supplies to help a family of four survive for three days after an emergency.

    DIY All-in-Four Portable Shelter

    First things first: Collect your gear. The following list describes what gear is needed to help four people survive for three days in an emergency.

    Each pack gives you more than 2,800 cubic inches of space to hold all of your emergency supplies and gear while providing durability and expandable comfort to stick with you on all your travels.

    Trail Hiker Backpack for a Portable Shelter

    This pack is a great way to include versatility to fit the needs of the owner. Wear the pack on your back, carry it by the handle, or roll it along the ground behind you. This is a great pack for people unable to carry a lot of weight on their back.

    Good hygiene will help keep you healthy and safe during an emergency. This kit provides basic bathing, dental, and toilet hygiene needs for a family of four.

    Family Sanitation Kit Part of our DIY Portable shelter solution

    These simple-to-setup and waterproof tents give you 49-square feet each to spread out and enjoy a good night’s rest.

    Just-add-water breakfasts, lunches, and dinners (plus sides and drinks) give you enough food to feed a family of four for 3.5 days.

    We typically recommend a two-tier approach for treating your water: have a microfilter and purifier. Adding the Katadyn Hiker Pro and Micropur tablets will help provide you and your family with filtered, purified water while remaining compact and lightweight.

    Katadyn Hiker Pro for a  DIY Portable Shelter

    Made from Tritan™ plastic, these bottles give you get extra durability in a BPA-free bottle. These are perfect to take on outdoor adventures or to use along with a microfilter in an emergency.

    This kit includes 397 pieces of first aid gear to help you survive every scrape, cut, burn, or bruise that you or a family member may get.

    These lightweight, pocket-sized sleeping bags unfold to wrap you in a covering that will reflect 80% of your body heat, keeping you warm on cool nights.

    Emergency Sleeping Bags for a DIY Portable Shelter

    These lightsticks are safe, reliable, and easy to use making them fantastic for families with children. Just bend, snap, and shake for a light source that will last up to 12 hours.

    Keeps you up-to-date with communication services, provides 30 minutes of light (with one minute of hand-cranking), and charges your cell phone (including many smart phones).

    Lightweight and reusable, an emergency poncho is a must-have to keep you dry from sudden storms.

    Easily alert rescuers to your location with an emergency whistle.

    This high-quality, BPA-free water container can store 2.5 gallons of water and collapses to easily fit in your pack. It even remains flexible in cold temperatures.

     Reliance Fold N Filter for a DIY Portable Shelter

    Use Sierra cups as bowls, plates, drinking cups, or as cooking and warming pans. Their versatility lets you get more done with less stuff to carry in your pack.

    BPA-free, washable, heavy-duty plastic spoons can be used for every meal you eat during an emergency.

    This kit includes over 172 hours of total warmth. It includes 6 Hand and Body Warmers, 4 Adhesive Body Warmers, and 2 Hand Warmer 2-packs.

    This super-compact stove is simple to use, fully flame adjustable, and stores easily. You don’t even need matches to light it. Requires a canister of Iso-Butane/Propane fuel, which can be purchased locally.

    Volcano Lite Stove for a DIY Portable Shelter

    Stormproof Matches will help you weather any storm. Blow them out, bury them, submerge them in water, do it all over again, and these Stormproof Matches will keep relighting themselves for up to 15 seconds.

    How to Build It

    Once you’ve gathered all of your supplies, you just need to pack them.

    Pack #1: Trail Hiker Backpack

    • 1 Twin Peaks Mountain Trails Tent
    • Katadyn Hiker Pro Microfilter
    • 4 (6 inch) Green Lightsticks
    • 24 Packets of food from the Gourmet 14 Day Supply
    • 1 Tritan Emergency Essentials Water Bottle
    • 4 Emergency Whistles
    • 397 Piece First Aid Kit

    To make your pack more compact, fit the lightsticks into the outside pockets along with the Wavelength Radio Charger Flashlight, the 4 Emergency Whistles, and the water bottle. The other items will fit in the main compartment of the pack.

     

    Pack #2: Trail Hiker Backpack

    • 1 Twin Peaks Mountain Trails Tent
    • 20 Packets of food from the Gourmet 14 Day Supply
    • 4 Emergency Sleeping Bags
    • 2 Tritan Emergency Essentials Water Bottles
    • 4 Emergency Ponchos

    Fit the water bottles into the outside pockets. The rest of the materials should fit within the main compartment of the pack.

     

    Pack #3: Olympia 18” Rolling Backpack

    • 4 Packets of food from the Gourmet 14 Day Supply
    • Reliance 2.5 Gallon Collapsible Fold-A-Carrier
    • 3 Sheets (or 30 tablets) of Micropur
    • 1 Tritan Emergency Essentials Water Bottle
    • 2 large Sierra cups
    • 2 small Sierra cups
    • 4 GSI Spoons
    • Warmth Emergency Kit
    • Volcano Lite Stove
    • Stormproof Matches

     

    Pack #4: Family Sanitation Kit

    The last “pack” is the Family Sanitation Kit which comes full of sanitation items for you and your family. About 1/3 of the bucket will still be empty for you to add additional or personal items too. The kit includes:

    • 1 – 6-Gallon Bucket
    • 1 – Bar of Soap
    • 1 – Tote-able Toilet Seat and Lid
    • 4 – Toilet Paper Rolls
    • 1 – Box Double Doodie Waste Bags
    • 1 – Epi-Clenz Plus Hand Antiseptic
    • 4 – Fresh & Go Toothbrush
    • 3 – ReadyBath Packets

    Each pack is manageable to carry and there’s extra room in most of them for personal items.

    Upgrades

    Although the basic items will help you survive during an emergency, some people prefer to have items that may make their time in a crisis a little more comfortable. If you’d like to upgrade some of the items in your kit consider adding the following:

    • Headlamps or flashlights instead of the lightsticks.
    • SOL Escape Bivvy in addition to the emergency sleeping bags.
    • One Month Supply of Water in addition to the filter. Instead of just adding a microfilter and purification tablets to your portable kit, try adding a one month supply of water. Water is priceless in an emergency and this item gives a family of four enough stored water to last for a week (drinking 64 ounces a day) in case a water source to filter from is unavailable.

    *NOTE: Upgrading items in the kit will change the price and weight of the pack. It also may require you to rearrange and reassemble how the all-in-four portable shelter kit is packed.  You can, of course, change the way items are distributed among the packs for redundancy in case you get separated.

    To make carrying your all-in-four kit a bit more comfortable, or to add even more space, replace the Family Sanitation Kit (pack #4) with another Trail Hiker backpack, put the kit items in the pack, and lash the bucket to the outside of the pack using [paracord] or another rope.

    Now that you’ve prepped yourself with all the supplies you need to help you and your family survive the days immediately after a disaster, try developing your survival skills with some of our Insight Articles:

     

    --Kim

    Sources:

    http://lifecubeinc.weebly.com/uploads/9/9/4/2/9942328/life_cube_sheltered_delivery_system_user_manual.pdf

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: shelter, emergency preparedness

  • If tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, or other natural disasters struck your hometown, would you be prepared to weather the rough days that follow until emergency response teams set up?

    Unfortunately, many people aren’t.

    A little while ago, we reported on an innovative idea of an inflatable shelter called the Life Cube. Responses to this survival shelter ranged from “awesome” to “too pricey”. After our initial article, we were interested in the background of the company and the idea of the Life Cube. We called up founders Michael Conner and Nick Pedersen to get additional details about this new way to survive in an emergency. We thought you might be interested in hearing what we found out.

    What is the Life Cube?

    Conner and Pedersen have created the Life Cube to ultimately provide relief within 24 hours to disaster victims.

    Life Cube

    The Life Cube inflates into a 12 ft. x 12 ft. “home” fully stocked with food, water, power, a means of communication, and furniture for a family of five to survive for 72 hours. Once set up, the Life Cube is weather-resistant against 40 mph winds without external tie downs, and against 55 mph winds with external tie downs. It can also withstand heavy snow loads—10 lbs. per square inch.

    And this fully stocked survival shelter only takes about 10-20 minutes to set up. If you’re really fast, it could take you as little as five.

    Check out this video of Conner and Pedersen setting up the Life Cube:

    Life Cube LC12 5 Minute Deployment from Nick Pedersen on Vimeo.

    Why Would I Need the Life Cube?

    The first 72 hours can be the hardest to survive as response teams work to set up. “That’s the time you’re on your own. The Life Cube is to help you in that time,” said Pedersen. Take note, however, that it can take much longer than 72 hours for help and supplies to arrive—three days is a minimum.

    Pedersen recommends that although the Life Cube comes fully stocked, it’s never a bad idea to add extra preparedness supplies of your own. Life Cube, Inc. may add supplies such as the Yeti 1250 and premade food kits for five. But Pedersen’s suggestion of storing extra supplies extends beyond adding more preparedness gear to the Life Cube.

    If you or anyone in your family use medications, wear glasses, or have other specific needs, adding those items to your bug-out-bag will personalize your supplies and provide you with vital items for survival.

    What’s New?

    Over the past few years, Conner and Pedersen have been working to upgrade the quality of the Life Cube.

    Why you need a Life Cube...

    “This year,” Pedersen said, “We are introducing a new foam floor with a special coating to make the Life Cube lighter. It’ll be about the same price, but cold-weather temperate and even buoyant so it can float.”

    These Life Cubes have been designed to be airdropped anywhere on Earth, so even in the most remote locations, disaster victims won’t have to wait for relief. Although the Life Cube is not the end solution, it is a viable option to consider when thinking about disaster relief.

    So how did it all begin?

    The concept of the Life Cube started in 2005, the year of Hurricane Katrina and the Kashmir earthquake in Pakistan. The survivors of these disasters were dying because they couldn’t get the food, water, and equipment they needed to survive. Michael Conner knew something needed to be done; a few napkin sketches were drawn up and the Life Cube was born.

    Each Life Cube is premade for a particular use, according to Pedersen. They can each be configured to respond to issues ranging from Command and Control/Communications Security to Medical to Decontamination and more.

    As of now, everything about the Life Cube is Military spec. For consumer products, Pedersen and Conner are working on a “Life Cube Every Man” which works more like a tent. This Life Cube would have the same features as the military-grade one, but at a lower price ($5000-$6000 each rather than $9,000-$15,000).

    The Life Cube is just in its beginning stages, but Conner and Pedersen have big goals for the future.

    “Our ultimate goal is to build a cache of units [and] have inventories in strategic locations in the country—and eventually around the world—so we can deploy within 24 hours of a disaster. Having caches would help us deploy in hours instead of days,” said Pedersen.

    In the past, Life Cube, Inc. has deployed for FEMA, the military, and the Joplin tornado. Today, Life Cube, Inc. is pursuing partnerships with FEMA, the Red Cross, and the U.S. Army to deploy Life Cubes where needed. They also are looking into pursuing municipalities. If caches of Life Cubes were placed in various cities, then local officials could deploy them immediately after a disaster strikes—without waiting for Federal Aid approvals or third-party organizations.

    What do you think about the Life Cube? Would you ever buy one? Do you think it’s a realistic solution?

    Not quite your style? Learn how to  put together your own all-in-one portable shelter solution by reading our article, "How to Build your Own All-in-Four Portable Shelter."

    --Kim

    Sources:

    “Life Cube Sheltered Delivery System Brochure.pdf”

    Interview with Nick Pedersen

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: shelter, Survival

  • The Life Cube is a completely stocked inflatable shelter

    “In tough circumstances, sometimes all you need is hope.

    “…but other times you need a blow-up survival shelter featuring a bed, a couch, freeze-dried food, a 50-gallon water bladder, a first-aid kit, a radio and a cookstove.”

    According to wired.com, the latter may be a consumer option in the near future. A company called Inflatable World is in the process of raising capital to produce what they’re calling the Life Cube—a 4”x 4” box containing a well-stocked, heavy-duty, inflatable shelter. The projected pricing is steep, and for now the company (whose link from the article doesn’t work) appears to be limiting its market to first responders and aid organizations, though we could see it for sale generally sometime soon.

    The Life Cube highlights a gap in our preparedness efforts. Most of us consider the need for shelter in our emergency prep and include items like tents and sleeping bags in our stash. (Read our article on shelter and warmth to learn why a product like this could be crucial.) But when a disaster necessitates long-term accommodations, FEMA has reported overcrowding and insufficient facilities in the motels and temporary shelters they typically use. The Life Cube stands somewhere between the tent and the high school auditorium, as a temporary dwelling comfortable (and private!) enough to stay in for weeks or months at a time. Think luxury camping during the apocalypse.

    So, what do you think? Would this be a useful addition to your prep gear? Does it sound preferable to a FEMA trailer? And would you be willing to pay five figures for it? We’re intrigued.

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: shelter, preparedness, Survival, emergency preparedness, Life Cube

  • Six Survival Structures to Help you in a Disaster

    Having a practical survival structure option is crucial in an emergency. This is why the Dutch non-profit organization INDEX recently held a structural design contest (structural design refers to the creation of buildings, homes, furniture, etc.) that asked contestants to create structures that could meet the growing global challenges that we face daily—one of these challenges being natural disasters.

    INDEX’s mission is to find the best designers who can create structures to improve the quality of life and to make daily tasks easier for all people. Each year, INDEX holds one of the largest design contests in the world.

    The CNN article, “In the Middle of a Natural Disaster? These Designs will Help You” highlights six survival structure from INDEX’s 2013 contest—designs that pay particular attention to helping people alleviate the impact of natural disasters in their lives.

    According to CNN, these projects “include a broad range of devices designed to save lives by helping rescue workers or giving people caught up in the aftermath of a natural disaster a way to help themselves.”

    The most interesting survival structure to me was the “Eliodomestico”. Its  structure is similar to a water well system, but it has a “futuristic” twist. The “Eliodomestico” gathers and distills sea water using the power of the sun to make it clean and safe to drink.

    Check out how the Eliodomestico works by watching this video.

    The other designs range from thin skyscrapers used as housing for victims of natural disasters to inflatable rafts that can be used as furniture. Take a look at the other five designs that CNN highlights by checking out their article, “In the Middle of a Natural Disaster? These Designs will Help You”.

    How useful/functional do you think these structures would be in a flood, tornado, or tsunami? Let us know in the comments.

    --Angela

    Image Source: http://www.nominateforindexaward.com/Presentation/read/id=MTc0MQ==

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: warmth, skills, shelter, preparedness, Survival, emergency preparedness

  • Make your own emergency kit

    Emergency kits come in all shapes and sizes, filled with all types of food, water supplies, shelters, and tools. But what is the right type of emergency kit for you? Building your own emergency kit is as simple as one, two, and three. For $10 or less apiece, you can arm yourself with the right products to help you meet your most basic needs in an emergency.

    1. Food & Water

    • Survival food packages like the Mainstay 3600 calorie bars work well because they are lightweight, compact, and delicious—they taste like cookie dough. Unlike traditional energy bars, these are formulated to withstand extreme temperatures and still last for 5 years. Keep them in your car, boat, RV, or inside your emergency kit at home. For only $7.50, these bars give one person enough calories for 3 days, or three people for a single day. 


    • Purified water in compact sizes can also be a good fit for adding to a backpack. Bottled water is a popular option, bottled water packages are prone to leaking and require frequent rotation. The 8 oz. Aqua Blox comes in sturdy packaging that is designed to keep your water safe for 5 years with the convenience of a juice-box-style package and straw. The water also comes purified, not just filtered, so it is contaminant free. Six of these blox would be sufficient drinking water for one person over 3 days for about $5. 


    • Filter Straws can treat natural water sources that you come across to allow you to find and treat water rather than carrying it. Simply suck water through the filter straw to remove common germs. If the source is frequented by humans or livestock, however, this filter would likely not provide the required protection. Cost is about $10.

    2. Shelter

    • Emergency ponchos pack up tight and are lightweight, yet provide substantial coverage to keep more of your body dry. Staying dry dramatically increases our comfort, making the emergency poncho an affordable and practical (about $1) addition to any kit. 


    • Portable Tents are another way to provide shelter—or even just to mark an area as your own. Unlike traditional tents, a tube tent is inexpensive, lightweight, and packs incredibly small to fit inside of your kit without forcing you to leave other items out. It is so light because of its simplicity – no poles, no stakes, just a tent wall. The tube tent is an 8 ft. long tube that shelters two people for about $4.

    3. Warmth

    There are two simple ways to stay warm in cold weather: 1) keep more of your own body heat, and 2) generate heat around you (campfires or heaters).

    •  Many of us use blankets and sleeping bags to retain more of our body heat.  Emergency sleeping bags are made of a high-efficiency reflective material that retains up to 90% of your body heat. They can be stored in very small spaces and only cost about $4. I’ve experienced a night in one of these bags and was very grateful I had it. 


    •  Having portable heat sources can keep your body from shutting down from loss of warmth. Disposable body warmers (larger versions of commonly-known hand warmers) provide heat for up to 20 hours and take up very little space. Their small size (and price – about $1 each) allows you to add several to your supplies. 


    •  Even if you aren’t a boy scout, you can start a fire with Emergency Essential’s various offerings of matches and strikers. One of my favorite options is Stormproof matches. Unlike conventional matches, these stay lit much longer to help you start a fire. Even if the matches get wet or the weather is windy, Stormproof matches will get the job done. You can buy a box by itself (about $4), or with a weather proof case for about $6. Check out the video on the link to see how amazing they are.

    See? Easy as 1-2-3. We have even set out to help you get started with the Basics Emergency Kit. This pre-made set includes many of these basic items and costs just about $20. This kit includes food, water, a poncho, 3 body/hand warmers, an emergency sleeping bag, a whistle, a lightstick, and an 18-piece first aid kit.

    With these basics, your emergency kit is off to a great start and can help protect you in a crisis. As your kit continues to grow, you can add more durable items to your supply, expanding it to prepare you for whatever the future may hold.

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: warmth, shelter, preparedness, emergency kit, water, Survival, emergency preparedness, food, Emergency Essentials, survival gear

  • Resolve To Sleep Well

    It’s the new year and we're all making resolutions. We've come up with a unique take on four common resolutions and have some recommendations we think will help. Check back each Tuesday in January to join the discussion on each resolution. 



    Resolve to Sleep Well During an Emergency
    Sleeping well during an emergency can get tricky. Sleeping is one of the body’s ways of rejuvenating, and good sleep is crucial to your well-being—especially in a crisis. 


    In order to sleep well you need to be comfortable, dry, and maintain a certain temperature, all of which can get tricky in an emergency. When you’re stuck outdoors it may be too cold or too hot for you to sleep comfortably – not to mention that you might be on a cot or the floor. To help you sleep better, add these solutions to your emergency kit.


    Let’s start with the Sportsman Hooded Blanket/Poncho. This versatile item has a lot of features. One is that the blanket/poncho retains up to 90 percent of your body heat. In a situation where you’re outdoors in the cold, the Sportsman Hooded Blanket/Poncho will make a big difference in helping you stay warm.
     


    Another feature of the Sportsman Hooded Blanket/Poncho is that it’s lightweight and unfolds to 72” by 72” so it’ll give you a lot of coverage. If you’re caught in the rain you can hang up the blanket/poncho as a shelter and keep yourself dry. Or let’s say that you’ve lost power and your home is  overheated. Try hanging the blanket in front of a window, with the reflective side facing out. This will provide much needed shade and give you the chance to rest a little easier.


    The Sportsman Hooded Blanket/Poncho has four layers—one of which is ASTROLAR® reinforcing fabric. This makes the blanket/poncho tear and

    puncture-resistant so you can rough it up and still be confident that it will see you through the night. Plus it’s on sale this month for $12.99.


    Keeping a reliable sleeping bag on hand is a good idea—even for those whose idea of camping is a hotel. All of our sleeping bags work well for camping, so consider their other uses. A sleeping bag might make all the difference on a cold winter night if the utilities go out.


    The Slumberjack line offers sleeping bags for a range of temperatures (rated for -20°, 0°, and 20° F). With draft tubes, collars, and hoods, these bags have what it takes to keep you warm in an emergency at home or in the outdoors.


    Even when you don’t need the sleeping bag for warmth, it can come in handy as an extra layer of padding between you and the ground. 


    If you do have to sleep on the ground, you’ll want a sleeping pad. We have a handful of self-inflatable Therm-a-rest sleeping pads that are small, lightweight, and affordable. Therm-a-rest mattresses are designed with outdoorsmen in mind, so they’re durable and reliable. This portable mattress will also give you another layer of insulation from the cold. In any sort of situation where you’re forced to evacuate, you’ll be glad to have a Therm-a-rest in your emergency equipment.


    It’s unlikely that in an emergency situation you’ll sleep as well as you would at home, but with the Sportsman Hooded Blanket/Poncho, the Slumberjack sleeping bags, or Therm-a-rest mattresses, we can help make that night a little more restful. 

     

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: warmth, shelter, sleeping bags, sleeping pads