Tag Archives: Shelf Life

  • Grains in white bowls

    There are a few factors that determine how long food will last after it is opened. They include the following:

    • The quality of the food at the time it is opened
    • The degree to which food is exposed to oxygen and moisture
    • The degree to which food is exposed to heat and light

     

    The quality of the food at the time it is opened:

    The older food storage gets and the more it is subjected to fluctuating temperatures (meaning below freezing and above 80 degrees), the more deterioration has probably occurred to the food inside the container.

    The degree to which food is exposed to oxygen and moisture:

    The moment the container is opened, the food is exposed to air. Air contains both oxygen and moisture. Many organisms require oxygen to survive. The higher the humidity (moisture content) of the air, the faster the product quality (nutrition and taste) deteriorates.

    The degree to which food is exposed to heat and light:

    Temperature greatly affects the speed at which food deteriorates. The higher the temperature is, the faster the quality (nutrition and taste) deteriorates and the shorter the time that food stays edible and safe. Since many organisms require light to grow, exposure to light also causes deterioration.

     

    Recommendation:

    Once you have opened your food storage, you can prolong its shelf life by eliminating the adverse affects listed above. Store your food in the coolest, darkest and most airtight environment possible.

    Consider the following options to extend the life of food, once the container has been opened.

    • Pour what has not been used into a zip-top freezer bag and seal the bag. Place the bagged food back into the can and replace the lid (to eliminate light).
    • Pour the remaining food into Snapware® containers, which offer an airtight seal.
    • Commercially available sealers can create an airtight environment. Put the food back into the can with the plastic lid secured.
    • Generally speaking, refrigeration or frozen storage can extend the life of food. If you do not have much refrigeration or frozen storage space, use a pantry, cupboard, etc.

    As a general rule, food stored in a #10 can or a bucket, depending on the above factors, may stay good up to one year after opening. Use your best judgment in deciding which food items to use. One way to determine if food is still of acceptable quality is to verify that it smells normal. Another way is to taste it or cook with it. If the quality of the finished product is satisfactory, continue to use it. Although food will lose nutritive value over time, old food retains some caloric and mineral value. It may have some life sustaining nutrients remaining.

    The information above are general guidelines intended to help make an educated decision. Each situation is unique due to many contributing factors.

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: airtight bucket, Food Storage Tips, Shelf Life, #10 cans

  • One of our customers, Walt, shared his experience with sprouting 10 year old sprouting seeds. We thought you might be interested to hear how it went.

    “(I) purchased (sprouting seeds) in 1999 just in case Y2K took a dive. I opened the alfalfa seeds to see if they were still good after ten years and had more sprouts then I needed. To sprout the seeds I soaked them for 8 hours - then used the kitchen sprouter (3/4 of a pound of seeds) in two trays on the counter top. I found out when they sprouted it was too much - had more then I could handle, the rest went into a friends garden and they sprouted. I would say about 90% to 95% of the seeds sprouted. As far as storage, that varied over the ten years; put in a box marked food storage with the temperature from 40 degrees to 90 degrees.”

    Remember to store seeds in as cool a location as possible (even the refrigerator or freezer if possible). This can greatly increase the shelf life.

    We love to hear success stories like this one! Send your experience to blog@beprepared.com, so we can share it with everyone else (don’t forget photos if you have any).

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: food storage, gardening, Sprouts, Sprouting, Shelf Life