Tag Archives: resources

  • Flooded house after heavy rain in the evening sunlight.

    If you’re ever in an area affected by severe flooding, you may have to evacuate your home or walk to safety. If this is the case, there are 5  tips for walking around safely in a rural area that would be helpful to know. These tips come to us from the Craft Theory blog.

    In light of the recent flooding in Colorado, the folks at Craft Theory shared these 5 tips. The tips on their list include items that you may not have thought about when it comes to walking around in a flooded area. Some things they suggest are wearing comfortable and appropriate shoes (if you can) and bringing bottled water with you on your journey.

    Check out the rest of Craft Theory’s 5 tips for Walking around Safely in a Rural Area on their blog. Some of these tips may surprise you.

    Also, if you want to pick up more tips on flood safety check out our Insight Article, “What to do Before, During, and After a Flood.”

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: resources, emergency preparedness, natural disaster

  • We thought we’d wrap up our First Aid series with an overview of some useful products and resources. And since medical emergencies come in all shapes, sizes, and flavors, we’ll look at a range of items, from “basic,” to “comprehensive,” to “crazy-hard-core.”

     

    First aid kits

    Basic: Cut finger? Skinned knee? The Pocket 1st Aid Kit has you covered. Ideal for a diaper bag, school backpack, glove compartment, or Christmas stocking, this go-anywhere collection of bandages and skin cleaners can take care of minor bumps and scrapes.

    Comprehensive: I really like the compactness of the 100 Piece First Aid Kit. Bandages, splints, gloves, and even booklet of first aid instructions all come in a neat, little plastic case. Fits perfectly under the seat of a car, stashes neatly in a closet or pantry, or saves space in a 72 hour kit.

    Crazy-hard-core: The 397 Piece First Aid Kit not only contains enough square yards of bandage to wrap an entire adult, head to foot, but comes with both a sturdy storage bag and a mini backpack. Use the small backpack for temporary trips, or divide the contents between the two bags to double your readiness (house/car, upstairs/downstairs, home/travel).

    *Bonus: None of these exactly what you need? Browse our loose supplies and assemble your own customized kit. Don’t forget a sturdy medic bag with lots of pockets, like this one:

    medic bag

    Books

    Basic: The American Safety & Health Institute’s little pocket guide, CPR, AED, and Basic First Aid: Pocket Reference Guide is a must. Throw one in your kit and keep another handy for a quick refresher.

    Comprehensive: For a bit more information, Emergency Essentials' Tips for Preparedness includes a whole chapter on first aid and sanitation. A bit bulky for the 72 hour kit, this is a good reference guide to keep on the bookshelf for family education.

    Crazy-hard-core: If you’re planning on skinning your knee or getting a snake bite, say, in the middle of Death Valley, skip the traditional first aid guides and grab Dr. Eric Weiss’s Comprehensive Guide to Wilderness and Travel Medicine. This one assumes you can’t just dial 911 and tells you how to treat everything from a thigh bone fracture to a collapsed lung.

     

    Apps

    Basic: Pocket First Aid and CPR from the American Heart Association includes basic instruction for choking and CPR, but also lets you store medical profiles for family members—particularly handy in an actual emergency. ($1.99)

    Comprehensive: I just downloaded the First Aid app by American Red Cross, and I’m amazed at the amount of information here! There’s a separate tab for information about different medical emergencies, one for emergency preparedness, and another with step-by-step instructions first aid instructions. Plus, it includes tests and other resources for certification and volunteering. And all for free!

    Crazy-hard-core: If you’re the type needs Dr. Weiss’s guide, it would also be worth your $.99 to invest in the Military Medic Book Collection – Army Medical First Aid Guide app. This uncanny collection of 25+ official military field manuals lets you download as many books as you want onto your device (for the one-time price of the app), as well as sort, scroll, and bookmark them. Because, really, who doesn’t need to know how to deliver a baby in a combat zone?

     

    The ability to quickly look up first aid tips on an app could be a lifesaving factor in an accident while you’re out around town. But keep in mind that many disasters will knock out power and you may not be able to charge or access your apps. That’s why having a printed first aid manual or book is so essential. Having these resources on hand (or on your phone/tablet) will enable you to respond to all kinds of first aid situations when the time comes.

    --Stacey

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: resources, skills, First Aid, Book

  • When you hear the word “prepper,” what’s the first thing that comes to mind? Popular media portrays preppers as anti-social, militant hoarders who want nothing to do with the world around them. But we know better, don’t we?

    We know you, like us, are concerned about taking care of your loved ones in every situation. You want the confidence and security of knowing you can do so. There are many families, across the nation, who have established or created networks with other prepared families. It’s not unusual.

    Instead of isolating themselves, most people seek out group interaction during and after an emergency or disaster. Scientists have shown that this is a biological response– humans seek out the advice and company of others. It’s called deliberating.*

    Last Friday we talked about finding other prepared individuals and families that are interested in working together. Our first Baby Step this week is a bit of a repeat, just to make sure you’re moving in the direction of establishing a support network.

    Baby Step 1: Make a list of people who are interested in forming a group and the skills, tools, and resources they have.

    You don’t have to be best buds with the people in your network, but they should be trustworthy. You should know what they can do and let them know what you can do.

    Go to page four of our Neighborhood Emergency Plan packet to see the skills and special equipment most commonly needed. These include medical and mechanical skills, along with special equipment and vehicles.

    Don’t overlook any skill or any individual. For example, does the teenager across the road know CPR from her summer job as a lifeguard? Pay attention to skills that are valued but not considered necessary for survival:

    • A psychologist can do a lot to help those with anxiety, panic, or extreme fear.
    • A good haircut from a barber or hairstylist can lift your mood.
    • A tailor or seamstress can repair damaged materials like tents, tarps, clothing, and maybe even shoes.
    • A ham radio operator, even a hobbyist, can communicate when telephone, internet, and cell phone lines are down.
    • A nutritionist or dietician may be able to suggest alternative sources of nutrients.

     

    Here are a few more skills you probably haven’t considered:
    • Community organizer
    • Entertainers (like musicians or comedians to boost morale)
    • Chimney cleaners (in case this is your only source of heat)
    • Knife sharpeners
    • Undertaker, mortician, and sanitation workers
    • Runners/hikers/swimmers/cyclists/horseback riders (for transporting information and goods)
    • Engineers and people who are good at rigging stuff
    • Gardeners
    • Self-defense instructors
    • Hunters, fishermen, and foragers
    • Navigators 

    Baby Step 2: When you’ve established your network, join our group purchasing program.

    We offer discounts for group purchases, often as much as 49% off. We also offer free shipping on the entire order regardless of size once the minimum quantity of a group item has been purchased (as long as the order is shipped within the contiguous 48 states). Click here for details.

    Baby Step 3: Develop a neighborhood plan and schedule an emergency drill.

    Download our Neighborhood Emergency Plan to help you organize your group’s efforts. Once your plan is in place, hold an emergency drill to practice the plan. The practice will help you figure out what works (and what doesn’t) so you can adjust your plan accordingly. If you’re planning a drill, let us know. We’d love to hear how the experience goes for your neighborhood, and we’d love to share your pictures and video with our network.

    Here’s another tip: After an emergency strikes, hold a swap meet. The idea here is not necessarily to pool resources. It’s more of a barter-for-what-you-need deal. If, like me, you have 14 cases of tuna and no mayonnaise, this is the venue for you. By exchanging goods and services it’s possible to cover gaps in your emergency and food storage plans. 

    Read more here: Emergency Swap Meet

     

    *Amanda Ripley in Surviving Disaster, PBS Documentary (link)

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: resources, skills, baby steps, tools, Preparedness network, medical professional, chimney sweep, family, individual, tailor, seamstress, psychologist, barber, hairstylist, nutritionist, dietician, group purchasing, sales, discount, emergency drill, Neighborhood Emergency Plan, Swap Meet

  • We've got relationships on the brain this month. Having a friendly relationship with your neighbors can be a crucial survival tool. Ideally every individual and family is prepared, but it’s almost impossible to gather all the information, knowledge, skills, and equipment you’ll need for every possible scenario. This is where building a neighborhood group or a network of prepared people can help.

    Once you’ve got your basic short-term survival kit and food storage taken care of, take a look at other prepared families and see how you might help each other. The idea is to find like-minded, trustworthy individuals who have differing skills, and are willing to work together in a crisis.

    To make sure your support network is in place before disaster hits, follow these baby steps.

    Baby Step 1: Make a list of your skills and resources.

    Think of services you can provide and what equipment you have.

    Baby Step 2: Make a list of skills and resources you need.

    Some of the most valuable resources are people with skills and equipment that are common, yet specialized. Here are some commonly needed skills:

    • Paramedic, nurse, other medical workers
    • Construction workers (with access to a backhoe, jackhammer, or crane)
    • Electricians, plumbers, carpenters, or masons
    • Mechanics, drivers, or people with a HAZMAT license

    Baby Step 3: Meet your neighbors.

    Borrow a cup of sugar. Yeah, it’s an excuse… but if you need a reason, this one is as good as any. To thank them, make a batch of something sweet and when you take it over, chat for a bit.

    If you’re not the outgoing, introduce-yourself-in-person type, no problem! Diane Schmidt at About.com has a great idea.

    “I once wrote a note and attached it to a jar of homemade jam and left it on a neighbor's porch. I introduced our family, said where we lived, and that we were around if they needed anything. It was simple and brief and in return, we found some really great friends.”

    Baby Step 4: Get to know your neighbors better.

    Invite your neighbors over for a backyard hot dog roast, a mid-winter wassail party, or multi-family game night. The event doesn't have to be elaborate. In fact, you’ll enjoy it more if it’s casual, low-key, and fun.

    • Play games based on specific skills: knot tying, communication, problem solving, first aid, etc.
    • Play a get-to-know-you game: Write questions on cards and use them as prompts.

                            Given a specific situation (stranded in your car, lost in the woods, etc.) what would you do?

                            Have you ever survived a natural disaster?

    If your neighbors don’t respond enthusiastically, don’t get discouraged. There are plenty of people in town who are interested in prepping. They may lay low, but you’ll find them.

    Baby Step 5: Reach out to people in your area via our Forum.

    Our forum is a virtual network across the U.S. Contributors actively discuss topics and answer each other’s questions. You’ll find that there is a wide range of participants, from beginners to seasoned preppers. Click here to visit the Emergency Essentials Forum.

    You may also consider posting a note on the message board at a local outdoor supplier, hunting and sporting goods store, or on the American Prepper Network.

    Always use caution when communicating via the internet. Don’t post any personal information like your home address or phone number. If you are going to meet someone you’ve been introduced to online, meet in a public place, tell someone you trust where you’re going, who you’re meeting, and when you plan to return.

    Build up a network before a disaster hits your neighborhood!

    Check back next Friday for a list of skills you’ll want in your support network but probably haven’t considered.

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: resources, skills, baby steps, dinner, Networking, Neighbors, tools, party

  •  

     

    In the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy, Google Crisis Map is a useful tool for finding emergency shelters, information about power outages, FEMA disaster declared areas, traffic conditions, and more.  The web page is a Google map with a search box in the upper left corner where you can search for a specific city or state.
    To the right of the map are a series of check boxes that when checked reveal icons and other imagery on the map. For example, you can click on a pink dot icon on the map to get information on a local Red Cross shelter (see image above).
    Having this and other information can help you, or someone you know in an affected area, get critical information. 


    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: hurricanes, resources