Tag Archives: recipes

  • Website Review: Gourmet Hunting & Foraging Recipes from HAGC

    I have a new favorite website. And bizarrely, it has nothing to do with British television or decorating with old maps (my current obsessions). In fact, it seems like it should be better suited to the tough guy I’m married to—and yet, I can’t look away!

    It’s called Hunter.Angler.Gardener.Cook (honest-food.net). It’s written by a guy named Hank Shaw who used to be a political journalist but now writes recipes.

    Hunter, Angler, Gardner, Cook--Website Review

    Cray recipes.

    Crazy, wonderful recipes using edibles he either shoots, catches, finds, grows, or (occasionally) sources locally. Hank describes himself as an “omnivore who has solved his dilemma.” He’s published two books, contributed to an endless stream of both outdoors and food magazines, and has even appeared on television to demonstrate his culinary skills.

    Hunter-Goose-Bockwurst_HAGC

    The website is primarily a recipe archive, and I have to admit, those food photos are the big draw. But it’s the extras that make this site such a treasure. Categorized by main course (wild game, seafood, etc.), each heading provides how-to’s (do you know how to cut up a squirrel?), hunting tips (did you know seasonal diet will determine bear meat’s flavor?), video tutorials (any idea how to fillet a skate?), as well as extensive links and references, and some pretty fantastic essays.

    Wood Duck and Acorn Dumplings Recipe

    And did I mention the recipes? If you hunt or know a hunter, you’ve probably had a fairly decent deer roast. And the down-to-earth Hank would not turn you away if you offered him a bite. But how about French frog legs, partridge Escabeche, or grilled boar heart with peppers and onions?

    Not to mention squash spaetzle, stinging nettle ravioli, and acorn flour pasta. And he has a whole category dedicated to the “wobbly bits,” as he calls them: heart, liver, and whatever else I usually make my husband throw away before roasting the Thanksgiving bird. Talk about stretching your resources!

    What Hunter.Angler.Gardener.Cook advocates is twofold. First it challenges us to expand our conception of food. Nature’s readily available bounty includes plants and animals that we’re not used to thinking about in terms of meals, but which could absolutely sustain us (and in shameless gourmet style, Shaw demonstrates!).

    And secondly, it encourages us to widen our skill set. In an emergency and without other resources, could you shoot a squirrel or identify an edible mushroom? True preparedness isn’t just about stockpiling resources, it's also about knowing how to access what is available outside your storage cupboard.

    --Stacey

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: fishing, Website/Blog Review, survival skills, hunting, skills, recipes

  • 4 Sweet Treats to Make from Food Storage

    Getting tired of eating the same chocolate chip cookies all the time? Are you looking for new desserts to try?

    If you're looking for a way to spice up your dessert menu, you’ve come to the right place. You can make tasty bakery-style treats any time of year using food storage supplies.

    Check out these 4 Sweet Treats to make with (or for) your loved just using ingredients you have stored at home.

    Peanut Butter Blossoms

    If you’re headed to a work or school party, these Peanut Butter Blossoms are sure to please a crowd. This recipe makes 48 cookies using our delicious Provident Pantry Peanut Butter Powder. Click on the picture to get the recipe.

    Peanut Butter Blossoms made from Food Storage

    Strawberry-Banana-Peach Cobbler

    Planning a romantic dinner at home? Whip up this Strawberry Banana Peach Cobbler for dessert and your significant other will be so impressed with your baking skills they’ll love you forever. To make it even simpler, but no less elegant, you can use our Fruit Crisp and Cereal Combo to make your crisp topping quickly and easily. Click on the picture below to get the recipe.

    Valentine's Strawberry-Banana-Peach Cobbler

    Banana Oat Crumb Cake

    If you're looking for a dessert that's healthy... our Banana Oat Crumb Cake is a pretty good choice to help you meet your goals (I mean, it’s got bananas and oats in it, right?). This delicious crumb cake had our employees asking for more and will have your loved ones doing the same.  Click on the picture below to get the recipe.

    Valentine's Banana Oat Crumb Cake

    Food Storage Muddy Buddies

    Any time of year is perfect for a chocolate gorge fest (well, at least that’s what it is for me . . .) Take a seat on the couch, pop in a movie, and treat yourself to a great night with our food storage Muddy Buddies. Click on the picture to get the recipe.

     Valentine's Muddy Buddies

    Bonus Treat!—Pick up a can of our Provident Pantry Brownie Mix and bake two “cakes”: one in a square pan and the other in a circle shaped pan. After baked, cut the circle cake in half. Turn the square cake to look more like a diamond, and place the two circle halves on the two top edges, and voila! A heart-shaped brownie treat you can frost, sprinkle with powdered sugar, or devour straight from the pan.

     

    Do you have a special treat you make from food storage? We would love to hear about it!

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: emergency cooking, recipe, recipes, food storage

  • Soup: Comfort Food Par Excellence!

    Nothing tastes better on a rainy or cold day than a savory bowl of hot soup. Homemade soup is simple to make because you can use ingredients you already have in the fridge or pantry. In addition, making your own soup will give you more variety than buying a pre-canned or dried soup mix from the store.

    Although store-bought soups certainly have their place in our diet and in our food storage, why not spice up this familiar comfort food by trying some of recipes listed below? Each recipe gives you a chance to test out cooking with food storage, while helping your family get used to eating food storage products.

     

    BEST-EVER CLAM CHOWDER

    Clam Chowder with Food Storage ingredients

    Yield: Serves 4-6

    1½ cups reconstituted Provident Pantry Freeze Dried Potato Dices

    2/3 cup reconstituted Provident Pantry Freeze Dried Celery Pieces

    ½ cup reconstituted MyChoice Freeze Dried Chopped Onions

    Provident Pantry Iodized Salt (to taste)

    MyChoice Mesh Black Pepper (to taste)

    2 cans minced clams

    2 tablespoons Red Feather Butter

    2 tablespoons Provident Pantry White Flour

    4-5 cups of reconstituted Provident Pantry Instant Nonfat Dry Milk

    Dash of nutmeg

    ¼ teaspoon liquid smoke

    Dash of dried parsley

     

    Directions

    1. Place prepared potatoes, celery, and onion in saucepan.  Drain liquid from both cans of clams onto the veggies and add just enough water to cover them.
    2. Add salt and pepper and allow mixture to simmer until potatoes are tender.  Set aside.
    3. In a heavy saucepan (different from the saucepan used before), melt butter and stir in flour.  Whisk in milk and stir until blended.  Cook, whisking often to avoid scorching, until mixture is thick.
    4. Stir in liquid smoke and nutmeg, then cooked vegetables.  Stir well. Add clams, heat for just a minute more and serve, topping each serving with a dash of dried parsley.  

    Nice to add:  Bits Provident Pantry Freeze-Dried Ham or crisp Yoder’s Bacon

     

     

    COCK-A-LEEKIE SOUP

    Chicken and Leek Soup from food storage

    Yield: Serves 6

    This Scottish soup gets its name from chicken broth (the cock-a-doodle-do) and leeks (a delicious, mild-flavored member of the onion family that looks like giant, fat green onions).

    Leeks are very popular throughout the British Isles, but are also beginning to be appreciated in the U.S. They’re even a national symbol of Wales. Leeks are nutritious and very good in soup or stuffing. They are also good braised, creamed, or raw in salads.

    Note:  Clean your leeks well before cooking, as the green leaves tend to trap soil that farmers mound around them as they grow.

    Ingredients

    3 large leeks (or 2 cups reconstituted MyChoice Green Onion if no leeks are available)

    2 tablespoons Red Feather Butter

    2 tablespoons Provident Pantry White Flour

    Salt and pepper (to taste)

    4-5 cups reconstituted Provident Pantry Chicken (Vegetarian) Broth

    ¾ cup Provident Pantry Instant Nonfat Dry Milk, reconstituted

     Directions

    1. Clean and trim leeks and slice thinly. (They won’t make you cry!) You’ll want to include an inch or so of the green part of the leeks if it’s not too tough.
    2. Melt butter in a heavy saucepan and add leeks (or green onions), stirring well.  Cook on medium heat for a few minutes until they begin to be translucent, then add flour and mix well.
    3. Add chicken broth and stir so that flour is mixed into the broth.
    4. Allow to cook on medium-low until leeks are tender and broth has thickened a little. Taste for seasonings and add salt and pepper as desired.
    5. Just before serving, stir in milk or cream and heat a little longer, but do not allow to boil.

    Good to add (with the broth):  1 cup reconstituted Provident Pantry Freeze Dried Potato Dices; 1 cup washed, chopped kale; bits of Provident Pantry Freeze Dried Chicken; Provident Pantry Freeze Dried Ham, Yoder’s Bacon, or MyChoice Freeze Dried Broccoli.

     

     

    CREAMY SQUASH SOUP

    Creamy Squah Soup made with food storage

     

    Yield: Serves 6

    Ingredients

    2 ½ cups cooked winter squash (works well with Butternut, Banana, Acorn,  Hubbard squash, or pumpkin)

    ½ cup reconstituted MyChoice Freeze Dried Chopped Onions

    ½ cup reconstituted Provident Pantry Freeze Dried Celery Pieces

    1 tablespoon Red Feather Butter

    3 cups Provident Pantry Vegetarian Chicken Flavored Broth

    1 cup Provident Pantry Instant Nonfat Dry Milk—or 1 small package cream cheese, depending upon how creamy and rich you like it

    Salt and pepper to taste

    2 tablespoons Provident Pantry Sugar—optional, if you like sweeter soup

    ½ teaspoon nutmeg

    ½ teaspoon ground ginger

     Directions

    1. Cook your squash or pumpkin; you can do this in a variety of ways, see methods for cooking your squash below. Scoop squash from any remaining rind and measure out about 2 ½ cups (you don’t have to be exactly accurate on this).
    1. Melt butter in a heavy saucepan and sauté onions and celery until onions are translucent but not browned.  Remove from pan.
    2. Heat broth in pan, and whisk in squash and seasonings.  Remove about half a cup to blender; add onions and celery and blend until smooth.  (If you’re using cream cheese, add this in chunks to blender with a little more broth mixture and continue to blend until smooth.)
    3. Whisk this blended mixture into that in the saucepan. If you’re using milk or half-and-half, add it to saucepan and blender mixture just before serving and whisk well to blend. Heat to warm the soup, but do not boil.
    4. Top each serving with a dollop of sour cream and an extra sprinkle of ginger, nutmeg, or paprika.

    Methods for cooking Your Squash:

    • Cut squash in half, remove seeds, and scrape any slippery fibers from the seed cavity. Bake the squash, covered with foil, and in a pan with a little water. The water steams it to a nice tenderness in 45-60 minutes.
    • Cut the squash into cubes and boil it in a saucepan until tender. 
    • Cut squash into pieces and cook in the microwave a few at a time.

     

    Do you have a favorite comfort-food soup recipe for winter months?

    --Sharon

     

     

    Sources:

    www.allrecipes.com/butternut-squash-soup

    www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/comfort

    The kitchen of Sharon Jarvis

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: emergency cooking, recipe, recipes, food storage

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