Tag Archives: recipes

  • Garden Vegetable Soup with Chicken Gnocchi

    We’re pretty excited about our new Garden Vegetable Soup with Chicken Gnocchi recipe here at Emergency Essentials. It got rave reviews from the employees who sampled it and it’s the recipe featured on the cover of our January catalog.

    Imagine a rich, savory broth with bites of chicken and spinach, tomatoes, cauliflower, corn, potatoes, and green onion, punctuated with chewy, delicious butter-browned gnocchi (Italian potato dumplings). What could be more delicious for a warm winter’s meal?

    This recipe was made entirely from food storage and draws from our featured MyChoice Freeze-Dried Garden Vegetable Combo, on sale this month for only $23.99—as long as supplies last.] This combo consists of six small cans of Diced Potatoes, Cauliflower, Spinach, Zucchini, Tomatoes, and Corn.

    But what makes this soup hearty and delicious is the White Chicken from our Freeze-Dried Meats Favorites Combo, on sale this month for $189.99.

    Check out the recipe for this yummy soup on our recipes page

    Or you can find it on page 19 of our January Catalog.

    Bon Appétit!

     

    --Sharon

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: food storage, recipes, recipe, emergency cooking

  • Favorite Holiday Meal

    Favorite Holiday Meal

    My husband’s siblings live in our general area, so on Christmas afternoon our family tradition takes us all to my brother’s home for a pot-luck holiday meal. His family, with a few dollars contributed by each of us, provides a ham and a turkey. The rest of us bring the trimmings—rolls, salads, relish plates, potatoes, vegetables, and desserts. These can vary from year to year, but here are some favorites:

    Sour Cream Party Potatoes—(known locally as “Funeral Potatoes” because they’re so often included at after-funeral luncheons!): Shredded cooked potatoes  baked with Cream of Chicken Soup, sour cream, green onions (optional) and grated cheese, topped with a crunchy layer of crushed cereal or potato chips. (See recipe below)

    Cranberry Orange Relish: chopped fresh cranberries; ground orange with some peel, sugar, and nuts; mixed into a black cherry or raspberry gelatin base. It tastes like Christmas!

    Green Bean Casserole—the usual combination of green beans (fresh-cooked, frozen, canned, or reconstituted freeze dried) mixed with French’s Fried Onions and some Cream of Mushroom Soup. Some folks add cheese, others slivered almonds or mushrooms. A delicious variation is fresh-cooked asparagus bites with Cream of Asparagus Soup.

    Raisin Sauce for Ham—a slightly thickened sauce of ham drippings, pineapple juice, and brown sugar, with a few plumped raisins to spoon over sliced ham.

    Butter-browned Parsnips—parsnips peeled and cut like carrot sticks, boiled a few minutes until just tender, then lightly browned in a skillet with butter.

    Layered Salad—Bite-size lettuce bits layered with ranch dressing, frozen green peas (they’ll thaw), shredded Swiss cheese, crumbled crisp bacon, and chopped green onions. Chill in layered state and toss just before serving.

    Christmas Jello—red and green layers of gelatin (with fruits as desired), separated by a layer of cream cheese mixed with whipped topping (and a little pineapple if you like). Top with a dollop of whipped topping on each serving.

    Sweet Potatoes and Apples—alternate slices of each in a casserole dish, top with melted butter and brown sugar and bake until tender. Variations: sweet potatoes and pineapple dices, or broiled pineapple and apple slices.

    Chocolate Peppermint Dessert—using a recipe for cream-puffs, spread pastry on cookie sheet and bake until lightly browned and puffy. Spread generously with mixed instant chocolate pudding, then a layer of whipped topping, finished with finely-crushed peppermint candy. Cut into squares.

    And a few fondly-remembered dishes from my southern childhood:

    Macaroni and Cheese Casserole (and I’m not the only one—be sure to see Mac and Cheese: A Holiday Tradition--and by the way, don’t miss Apple Cinnamon French Toast—a Christmas Tradition—I’m trying that one this year!)

    Cornbread Stuffing for Turkey—Use the same seasonings as for bread-crumb stuffing: sage, thyme, onion, celery, and chicken or turkey broth--used to moisten crumbled cornbread instead of wheat bread crumbs. (See recipe below)

    Pecan Pie—whole pecans topping a rich filling made of dark Karo syrup and eggs

    Sweet Potato Pie—similar to pumpkin, but made with cooked, pureed sweet potatoes instead, making a slightly thicker texture.

    Recipe: “Sour Cream Party Potatoes” (the mostly-food-storage version)

    4 cups reconstituted Provident Pantry Hash Browns, drained

    1 tablespoon Provident Pantry Green Onions (or any of our Onions)

    1 ½ cups Provident Pantry Shredded Freeze-Dried Cheddar Cheese

    Sauce:

    Whisk together in a medium saucepan:

    3 ½ cups cold water

    1/2 cup Provident Pantry Cream Sauce and Soup Base mix

    1 tablespoon Provident Pantry Chicken Broth mix

    ½ cup Provident Pantry Sour Cream Powder

    Bring to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes.

    Fold drained potatoes into sauce. Add onions and cheese and stir well. Pour into a buttered casserole dish and top with crushed potato chips or crushed cereal such as crispy rice or corn flakes. Dot with Red Feather Butter. Bake at 350° F for ½ hour or until bubbly.

     

    Recipe: Cornbread Stuffing (the mostly-food-storage version)

    1 batch of Provident Pantry Corn Muffin Mix, prepared the day before if possible, cut in slices and allowed to dry out

    ½ cup Provident Pantry Chopped Onions, reconstituted

    ¾ cup Provident Pantry Celery, reconstituted

    1 ½ teaspoons sage

    1 teaspoon thyme

    1 teaspoon dried parsley

    ½ teaspoon Provident Pantry Black Pepper

    3 tablespoons Red Feather Butter or Clarified Butter

    About 2 cups Provident Pantry Chicken Broth, prepared

    In butter, sauté the onions and celery for a few minutes, then add seasonings. Add 1 cup of the chicken broth and let simmer for a couple of minutes. Crumble the dry cornbread into fine pieces and add to skillet, stirring to absorb the liquid. Add more chicken broth as needed to get the consistency you like. If you’re planning to stuff a turkey or a chicken, make your stuffing a little on the dry side, as it will absorb juices from the bird. Otherwise, spoon stuffing into a casserole dish and cover. Keep warm until it’s time to serve.

    There you have it—some of my favorite traditional holiday foods. Do you have a favorite holiday meal? Leave a comment and let us know!

    Happy holidays!

    --Sharon

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: food storage, recipes, freeze dried, #10 cans, holiday, traditions

  • Whenever I think about Christmas, I think about Mac and Cheese . . .

     Oven Baked Mac and Cheese from Food Storage

     

    For my family, every holiday with a feast requires Mac and Cheese as a side (this sometimes includes birthdays and graduations as well). To me, the best thing about Christmas is not the presents or the lights; it’s going home to Virginia and eating my aunt’s homemade Mac and Cheese!

    When I asked my aunt for the recipe, she said she doesn’t have one! She makes it all from memory. But according to her, the secret to making the best Mac and Cheese you’ll EVER eat in your life is Hot Sauce and Cheese Soup. Luckily, the dairy products offset the spiciness—I know it sounds “different,” but once you eat it you’ll be a believer (trust me, I don’t eat spicy foods).

    I found a recipe similar to hers from food.com that will (literally) spice up your Christmas dinner using food storage.

     

    Oven Baked Mac and Cheese

    1 lb. Provident Pantry Elbow Macaroni Pasta

    2-3 Cups Provident Pantry Cheese Blend (Follow directions on can to make into a cheese soup)

    2 (12 ounce) cans Evaporated Milk

    5/8 cup Provident Pantry Butter Powder (reconstituted) or 1 ¼ sticks of butter

    1 teaspoon Provident Pantry Iodized Salt

    1 teaspoon Provident Pantry Black Pepper

    6 cups Provident Pantry Shredded Cheddar Cheese (you can also blend in other cheeses as well like Provident Pantry Shredded Colby or Provident Pantry Shredded Monterey Jack)

    (Optional) Hot Sauce (to taste)

    Directions

    1. Preheat oven to 350◦
    2. Cook pasta according to directions on the can.
    3. Mix together cheese soup, evaporated milk, butter, salt, and pepper in a large microwave safe bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and cut a small slit to vent. Heat for 6-7 minutes or until milk, cheese soup, butter, and hot sauce are melted into a cheese sauce. (My aunt usually heats all these ingredients on the stove, stirring occasionally until ingredients are blended and so that they don’t stick to the pan or boil over).
    4. Pour 1/3 of the pasta and 1/3 of the cheese sauce mixture into a large 9” x 13” pan. Cover with 1/3 of your shredded cheeses.
    5. Repeat step four until all the pasta, cheese sauce, and cheese is in your baking pan.
    6. Bake for 40-45 minutes.
    7. Pull out of oven and let stand for 5 minutes. Then eat up!

     

    So there you have it folks, Mac and Cheese for the holidays! Consider making Mac and Cheese a traditional part of your holiday meals as well if you love this recipe.

    Happy Holidays!

    -Angela

     

     

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: food storage, recipes, holidays, holiday, holiday gifts

  • With Halloween over and Thanksgiving soon to arrive, before we know it Christmas will be here and those who start prepping for it now will have an easier, less stressful holiday season.

    The Christmas season is a time of parties, a stream of festivities, a never-ending row of colorful lights, and a lot of fun.  Start preparing now so that you can enjoy the winter wonderland that surrounds Christmastime without being overloaded and overstressed. One huge stressor during the holidays is trying to get gifts at the last minute—this is never a fun way to spend the few weeks before Christmas. Don’t wait until the last minute to figure out what gift you’re giving all of your friends, neighbors, and family members this year.

    Usually for Christmas we all seem to get the cookie platters, baked goods, or holiday decorations. Although these standard go-to gifts are fun (and for some of us, allow us to indulge in our weakness of candy!), why not step away from the crowd and give an inexpensive, unique gift to those you love most?

    My sister actually gave me a fantastic, delicious recipe that will both sweeten and spice up your friends’ holiday—Pepper Jelly.

    Small colorful sweet peppers isolated on white background

    Mmmm! Pepper jelly matches sweet with spicy in a delicious blend of flavors using bell peppers, jalapenos, and a few other ingredients. This recipe is easy to make in large batches, and only uses a few ingredients per batch, making it perfect for a holiday gift.

    Pepper Jelly

    Yield: 8 ½-pint jars

    *You could even do both colors (in separate jars) to create a Christmas season feel

    1. Combine peppers, vinegar, sugar, and cayenne in a large pot
    2. Cook on medium until it boils
    3. Add the Certo, boil 5 minutes (let it boil for the full 5 minutes, or it won’t set.)
    4. Remove from heat
    5. Add food color
    6. Pour into jars

    Pepper jelly is a unique recipe that a lot of people haven’t tasted before, but is savory nonetheless. If sweet and spicy aren’t quite your taste, other traditional jams and jellies make great holiday gifts as well. For a variety of delicious recipes see our Jams and Jellies that please post.

     

    Storing your Jam/Jelly

    Short-term storage is a great way to seal your jelly, protecting it from bacteria until you are ready to dive into it. There are three ways to package your jelly for short-term storage: Traditional Canning, Freezing, and Storing to eat.

    Traditional Canning

    Traditional canning involves cooking your ingredients before sealing them in their individual jars by processing your batch in a boiling water bath. This process takes longer to do because of the cooking time, but ensures that all of your ingredients are clean and ready to eat.  As soon as the jelly is poured into their individual jars, cap them and place in a boiling water bath for ten minutes.  Remove jars and set aside to cool. Soon after removing from the boiling water, you should hear a ‘pop!’ indicating that the jar has sealed itself. If you are unsure as to whether or not it sealed, just poke the lid. If it concaves and then bounces back at your touch, then it did not seal properly. In that case, store it in your fridge and eat within the next few weeks.  You can store traditionally canned jelly for up to a year.

    Freezing

    Freezing is another way to package your jelly for storage. This process takes much less time than the traditional canning method.  After the jelly has been poured into its individual freezer-safe containers, let it cool before capping it, and then place it in the freezer until you are ready to use it. Freezer jams can last up to a year in the freezer or a few weeks in the fridge.

    Store to Eat

    The last way to store your jelly is to store it to eat. Once you have poured the jelly into its individual jar and have let it cool, cap it and place it in the fridge. The recommended storage life is about a month, but I have had my Pepper Jelly in the fridge for two and it still tastes delicious. This type of storage is perfect if you plan to eat your scrumptious jelly right up.

     ***

    Jams and jellies are fantastic gifts to give anytime of the year because they’ll last. When you give jam as a gift, your friends can either break into the bottle immediately or save it for a time when their own sugary supply of holiday goodies gets low.  Jams and jellies are able to store for up to a year depending on how you seal it.

    Jams and jellies give you an inexpensive option when you want a unique, desirable gift for your loved ones. Freeze dried and dehydrated fruits and vegetables are perfect for adding into your jams/jellies without having to break your bank, just use a little here and a little there and still have plenty for later.

    -Kim

    Sources:

    http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_07/storing_jams.html

    http://www.betterrecipes.com/blogs/daily-dish/2011/07/27/how-to-make-homemade-jelly/

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: food storage, recipes, skills, baby steps, preparedness, Budget, freeze dried food, holiday

  • Jams and Jellies that Please

    Jams and Jellies are great additions to your food storage

    Nothing in the pantry or storage room looks more attractive than a shelf of clear, jewel-like jellies and fruity jams. There’s also the satisfaction that you’ve preserved summer’s fruit in delicious spreads that brighten winter meals, whether a simple peanut butter and jelly sandwich or an elegant conserve to go with a holiday ham dinner. Once you learn a few basics, they’re easy and fun to make, and don’t require a pressure canner.

    First, let’s get our terms straight!

    • Jam is made from chopped or ground whole fruit
    • Jelly uses only the extracted juice of the fruit
    • Preserves typically contain larger chunks of fruit or even whole fruit as in strawberry or gooseberry preserves
    • Conserves are fruits mixed with raisins or nuts
    • Marmalades are based on juice and finely-chopped orange or other citrus peel
    • Butters are spiced, long-cooked, smooth spreads

     Traditional jams, jellies, and preserves require long cooking times and the natural pectin that occurs in some fruits. I warmly recall dark, syrupy preserves of the hard sand pears that grew on our property in Florida. They were heavenly on hot biscuits or with bread and cheese! It seemed to me that Mom cooked those fragrant preserves all day to get them tender and perfect.

     Quick-cooking or freezer jams and jellies need added pectin in order to achieve a “gel.” They’re easy to make—just follow a dependable recipe to the letter!

    You will need:

    • A heavy pot such as a flat-bottomed Dutch oven or the pot of a stainless steel pressure cooker. It’s best not to use aluminum, as the acid in the fruits and lemon juice can react with it, giving a metallic taste to your product and perhaps ruining the pan
    • Hot, clean jars—probably pints or smaller—to bottle your product
    • A wide-mouth funnel
    • Hot, clean, new lids and rings
    • Ladles, jar lifters, pot holders, a clean kitchen towel, and (if you like) a candy thermometer
    • For jelly: a colander, cheese cloth or jelly bag, and large bowl
    • A water-bath canner to properly seal the jars
    • Probably bottled lemon juice or vinegar (don’t ignore these; they brighten the color and flavor, help the gel to set, and help preserve the product)
    • Sugar (unless you have a sugar-free recipe), which preserves the color of the jam or jelly, enhances the flavor of the fruit, helps the gel set, and gives a glossy sheen to the product
    • Fruit.  Choose ripe fruit, but not overripe and mushy, for best results. Some cooks feel that jam is what you make from the overripe fruit that can’t be bottled, and that all they need to do is trim off the bad spots—but the truth is that unseen colonies of bacteria have reached deep into the fruit and can cause spoilage on the shelf. Also, overripe fruit has less pectin than slightly-under ripe fruit. A good ratio is 1/3 under ripe fruit to 2/3 ripe fruit to guarantee a good set.

     

    Jelly challenges? We’ve got you covered.

    It can be tricky getting jelly to set properly. Some jellies gel at once, while others seem a bit loose but firm up after a few days. If it never gels, use it as a yummy pancake syrup. Put a bow on the lid and give it to friends, letting them think syrup was your objective all along! You could also reheat it, add a little more liquid or powdered pectin, and try again!

    Another challenge is keeping jelly clear and jewel-like. Cloudiness in jelly can often be avoided by warming the fruit gently before attempting to strain the juice off, then using several thicknesses of damp cheesecloth or a jelly bag in a colander to filter out pulp. Try to resist the impulse to squeeze or mash the softened fruit very much as that can produce cloudy juice. If it still clouds, don’t stress! It may not be as pretty, but the flavor will not be affected.

    If you’re making a jelly without added pectin, such as one including apple juice, there are tests you can apply to see if your hot jelly has reached “gel” stage:

    • Watch the bubbles. Tiny bubbles mean you’re not there yet. When they get larger and more numerous, you’re approaching a gel.
    •  If you’re using a candy thermometer, 220° F is the magic number.
    • Or, you can dip a spoon into the jelly and see if it “sheets” together when you drip it from a spoon. When it coats the spoon, and the last two drops merge into one as they drip back into the pot, you’re there!

     

    JAM AND JELLY RECIPES

    Traditional-style Apple Jelly 

    1. Wash and stem the apples, but leave the peel and core.
    2. Cut into chunks and put into a large stockpot. Add enough water to barely cover, bringing to a simmer.
    3. Cook until tender, about 30 minutes.
    4. Pour into a dampened jelly bag or a colander lined with dampened cheesecloth (dampening the cloth keeps it from wicking up and holding the apple juice) and allow the juice to drain into a large bowl overnight in the refrigerator. Do not squeeze or press the bag.
    5. Measure 1 quart of the resulting juice and add it to a large saucepan over high heat. Stir in the sugar and lemon juice. Bring to a full boil that you cannot stir down.
    6. Continue to boil until the gel stage is reached.
    7. Remove from heat and quickly transfer to clean, hot jars, as apple jelly sets up fast. Cap and refrigerate or process in a boiling water bath for ten minutes.
    8. For a boiling water bath, turn off heat and allow jars to rest in water for 5 minutes. Remove jars and set aside for 24 hours, then check seals and store for up to a year.

    Nice to do: Add a few fresh mint leaves to the apples as they cook for a delicious mint jelly.

     

    Red Currant Jelly

    If you’re fortunate enough to have access to fresh red currants, you can make this beautiful and delectable jelly for your own table and as gifts. For Christmas, consider giving a small jar of this red jelly and a matching one of green pepper jelly with a package of cream cheese and some crackers—delicious!

    1. Place the currants into a large pot and crush them with a potato masher.
    2. Pour in 1 cup of water and bring to a boil.
    3. Simmer for ten minutes, and then strain through a dampened jelly bag or cheesecloth.
    4. Measure out 5 cups of the juice into a large saucepan and stir in the sugar.
    5. Bring to a rapid boil over high heat and stir in the liquid pectin. Return to a full rolling boil for 30 seconds.
    6. Remove from heat and skim foam from the top.
    7. Ladle into clean hot jars and wipe rims. Cap with new, sterile rings and process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes.

     

    Green Pepper Jelly (Paula Deen’s recipe)

    1. Process bell pepper and hot peppers in a food processor or blender until finely minced.
    2. Combine pepper mixture, vinegar, and sugar in a saucepan and bring to a rolling boil.
    3. Remove from heat and add pectin and food coloring.
    4. Pour into hot, sterilized jars and cap, then process for 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

     

    Rhubarb-Orange Jam 

    1. In a saucepan, combine the rhubarb, sugar, orange zest, orange juice, and water.
    2. Bring to a boil, and then cook over medium-low heat for 45 minutes, stirring occasionally until thick. (It will thicken more as it cools.)
    3. Ladle into hot, sterile jars and seal with lids and rings.
    4. Store in the refrigerator.

    Makes 2 pints.

     

    Mixed-Fruit Jams

    One of the most creative and fun things to do in making jams and jellies is to mix compatible fruits—and most fruits are compatible! Some popular combinations are apricot-pineapple jam, cherry-apple jelly, currant-apple jelly, and apple-grape jelly. If you are mixing fruits without a specific recipe, your safest bet is to be sure that you are using the amounts of pectin and lemon juice called for in the recipes that come in a package of pectin for whichever fruit in your mix requires the largest amount of each. For example, if you’re mixing plums (which are naturally low in pectin) with peaches (which are high in pectin) use the amount of lemon juice and pectin recommended for the plums to be sure of a good set.

     

    Golden Mixed Jam 

    1. Mix the juices, fruits, and sugar in a large, heavy (non-aluminum) saucepan; let stand one hour.
    2. Bring to a full, rolling boil and boil 1 minute.
    3. Remove from heat and immediately blend in the pectin. Stir for 5 minutes.
    4. Ladle into hot sterilized jars and seal.
    5. Process for 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

    Makes six half-pint jars of jam.

     

    Cherry-Blueberry-Rhubarb Jam (so good!)

    1. In a heavy pan, combine rhubarb, blueberries, cherries, lemon juice, and water.
    2. Cook for 2 minutes. Remove from heat, add pectin, and stir thoroughly.
    3. Add sugar, stir well, and return to heat. When it reaches boiling, allow to boil for 4 minutes.
    4. Remove from heat, skim off any foam, and ladle into hot, sterilized jars.
    5. Cap and process for 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

     

    Pear Preserves

    Use a variety of hard pear, such as Kiefer, Southern Sand, or Chinese Sand Pears, as they will keep their texture in a preserve and not turn to mush in the cooking process. The ingredients are simple:

    1. Layer pear pieces and sugar in a heavy pot and allow to sit overnight to release the pear juice.
    2. Place over medium heat and simmer, stirring often until desired color and consistency is reached. Color can range from pale to dark amber.
    3. Ladle into hot, sterilized jars and process for 10 minutes in a boiling water bath to seal.

     

    Strawberry Freezer Jam 

    1. Mix lemon juice into strawberries. Sprinkle pectin over berries and stir well to dissolve.
    2. Add Karo syrup, stir in.
    3. Add sugar and mix well until it’s dissolved.
    4. Ladle into clean jars or plastic freezer containers and fill to within ¾ inch of top.
    5. Cap, allow to sit on your counter for several hours, and then freeze.

     

    Traditional Cooked Strawberry Jam 

    1. Mix berries and sugar and allow to sit for a while on your counter and then overnight in your refrigerator to allow the fruit to soften and the juices to be drawn out.
    2. Transfer berries to a large stainless-steel or enameled pot and bring to a boil, crushing and stirring the berries. Add lemon juice and stir well, continuing to cook for about 20 minutes or until the jam reaches the desired consistency.
    3. Remove from heat and allow jam to sit for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.
    4. Ladle into hot, sterilized jars, cap, and either refrigerate or process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes.

    Jam and jelly-making is as much an art as a science, and with practice, you’ll soon gain confidence in your ability to create colorful and delicious products!

     

    Sources:

    www.nchfp.edu/how/can7_jam_jelly.html

    www.southernfood.about.com/od/jamsjellies/Jams_Jellies_and_Preserves.html

    www.simplycanning.com/jam-or-jelly.html

    www.pauladeen.com/index.php/recipes/view2/pepper-jelly

     

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: food storage, recipes, freeze dried, Emergency Essentials, holiday

  • iStock_000024148922XSmall_vegetable_beef_soup

    This Vegetable Beef Soup recipe comes to us from the family cookbook of Sharon, one of our bloggers. This recipe was passed down to Sharon by her mother, and Sharon has passed it down to us, and now, we’d like to pass it along to you because you are all important members of our Emergency Essentials family.

    This recipe has only been made using fresh ingredients . . . until now. I accepted the challenge of making this vegetable beef soup using ONLY freeze dried veggies and meats. The results? This is probably one of the tastiest vegetable beef soups that I’ve ever had!  Here’s how you make it:

    Old Fashioned Vegetable Beef Soup

    ½ C Provident Pantry™ Beef Broth (Vegetarian) reconstituted (or 8 tbsp. broth powder to 8 cups water)

    1/2 C Provident Pantry™ Tomato Powder reconstituted (or 4 tbsp. powder to 1/2 cup hot water)

    1/3 C Provident Pantry™ Chopped Onions

    ¼ C Provident Pantry™ Freeze Dried Celery (if you like celery, go ahead and add more)

    1 C Provident Pantry™ Freeze Dried Roast Beef Steak

    1 C Provident Pantry™ Tomatoes

    3 tbsp Provident Pantry™ Carrot Dices

    1/3 C Provident Pantry™ Potato Dices

    ½ C Provident Pantry™ Freeze Dried Sweet Corn

    ½ C Provident Pantry™ Green Beans

    1 C Provident Pantry™ Egg Noodles

    Also add your choice of the following: 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce; 1 teaspoon Provident Pantry™ Dried Basil Leaves, parsley, or Provident Pantry™ Italian Seasoning; Provident Pantry™  Dasher Seasoning, ½ teaspoon Provident Pantry™  Garlic Salt, a dash of cayenne pepper, or a couple of tablespoons of Parmesan Cheese.

    Directions

    1. Reconstitute 1 cup roast beef steak, 3 tbsp. carrot dices, and 1/3 cup potato dices according to directions on each can.
    2. Cook 1 cup egg noodles according to directions on the can. When tender, set aside.
    3. Fill your soup pot with 4 cups of reconstituted beef broth and ¼ cup reconstituted tomato powder (Save the other 4 cups of beef broth and ¼ cup tomato powder to add if soup gets too thick later)
    4. Add 1/3 cup chopped onions and 1/2 cup water
    5. Add 3 tbsp of  reconstituted carrot dices
    6. Add 1 cup of reconstituted roast beef steak
    7. Add 1/3 cup of reconstituted potato dices
    8. Let simmer for 5 minutes
    9. Add ¼ cup celery (not reconstituted) and ½ cup warm water
    10. Add ½ cup green beans (not reconstituted) and 1 cup warm water
    11. Add ½ cup corn (not reconstituted) and 1 cup warm water
    12. Add 2/3 cup tomatoes (not reconstituted) and 1 cup warm water
    13. Add seasonings (I added Dasher Seasoning, Italian Seasoning, and Garlic Salt)
    14. Simmer uncovered for 10-20 minutes (or until all items are tender)
    15. Add egg noodles and extra broth and tomato powder (to taste) or to thin the soup if it is too thick

    Serve with crusty French bread or Mountain House Pilot Crackers. This soup is also good for leftovers and can be frozen to serve another time.

    Variation: Stew!

    Sharon’s original recipe said to add all the ingredients into the broth mixture without reconstituting them. However, I learned the hard way that some dehydrated foods (like carrots, potatoes, and egg noodles) can suck up a lot of water, making your soup become a stew!

    So if you want to make a stew, simply add all of the ingredients into a pot of 4 cups (or 8 cups if you want a lot of stew) broth mixture and DO NOT reconstitute them before putting them into the mixture.

    We hope you enjoy cooking and eating this Vegetable Beef Soup as much as we did! Have any of you ever tried making soup from food storage? Do you have any recipes for soup that we should test out? If so, please send them our way in the comments section of this post.

    -Angela

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: food storage, recipes, emergency cooking

  •  Homemade Baby food from food storage

    Here’s a unique way to use your food storage: make baby food! If you’ve got little ones, having a supply of homemade baby food on hand could help you save money and assure you that the food you’re feeding your baby isn’t full of preservatives. Since many freeze dried foods come chopped, sliced, and peeled, cooking baby food with food storage will cut the prep time at least in half.

    The best part is that you can use this pre-made baby food every day or store it for an emergency. If you make and can your own baby food, you can have supplies ready to toss in a grab and go bag if you need to evacuate, or ready at home if you have to shelter in place.

    Here are some recipes and tips for making baby food from food storage.   

    Mango Blueberry Puree (ages 6 months +)

    1 ½ C Provident Pantry® Freeze Dried Mango Chunks

    1 C MyChoice™ Freeze Dried Blueberries

    1 C Provident Pantry®  Freeze Dried Banana Dices

    Reconstitute ingredients following the directions on the can. Place all ingredients into a blender or food processor and blend to desired consistency. Serve.

    Variation for adults: Put all reconstituted ingredients into a blender with 1- 1 1/2 C reconstituted Provident Pantry Non-fat Dry milk for a smoothie. Add milk until smoothie reaches your desired consistency. (The smoothie is rather tasty! I HIGHLY recommend making it for yourself as a treat.)

    Blueberry, Spinach, and Apple Puree (ages 6 months +)

    1 C MyChoice™  Freeze Dried Blueberries

    2 C Mountain House®  Freeze Dried Apple Slices

    A Handful MyChoice™ Freeze Dried Spinach

    Reconstitute ingredients following directions on the can. Place all ingredients into a blender or food processor and blend to desired consistency. Serve.

    Spinach, Apple, and Blackberry (ages 6 months +)

    1 C MyChoice™  Freeze Dried Spinach

    2 C Mountain House®  Freeze Dried Apple Slices

    1 C MyChoice™  Freeze Dried Blackberries

    Reconstitute ingredients following directions on the can. Place all ingredients into a blender or food processor and blend to desired consistency. Serve.

    Tip: Make sure that the Blackberry seeds are blended well. Also, be aware that the Spinach has a strong taste. Consider adding more apples if needed.

    Tips for Cooking Baby Food from Food Storage

    • Many baby food recipes for fresh produce suggest boiling the food before you puree it, and using the water it was boiled in to preserve nutrients.
    • Once you rehydrate the fruits and veggies, they’ll already be soft, so you can skip the boiling step (unless boiling is called for in the directions to rehydrate the food) to preserve nutrients.
    • Use a little bit of the water that you drain from the fruits and veggies after re-hydrating to put into your puree to add nutrients.
    • You can make baby food in a blender or food processor. You may want to also consider getting a hand-operated food processor like this Food Strainer or the Kitchen Plus 2000 so you can puree baby food quickly and easily—with or without electricity.
    • Be adventurous and try new combinations—add or subtract ingredients to your taste.

     

    How to Store Baby Food from Food Storage

    • If you store your baby food in an ice tray, it will last in the freezer for up to three months! You can also use Ziploc bags, breast milk bags, or Tupperware to freeze your baby food in and to take with you on the go.
    • According to the USDA, it is safe to can homemade baby foods made from fruits that are highly acidic. The [USDA website] provides a chart for canning pint size and half pint size jars using a boiling water bath.
    • Do NOT can pureed veggies, low-acid fruits, or red meats or poultry meats using a boiling water bath (even tomatoes that are high in acid and considered a fruit). You will have to use a pressure canner like the All American Pressure Canner to preserve baby food recipes with these ingredients.

     

    Other Baby and Toddler Friendly Food Storage Items to check out: Food storage items are also great for toddlers because they’re great finger foods  and snacks that are soft and easy to eat. Here are some other food storage items that are good for babies and toddlers.

    Provident Pantry®  Yogurt Bites

    Provident Pantry®  Fruits and Veggies

    Provident Pantry®  Pudding

    Provident Pantry®  Dairy, Eggs, and Meat (depending on your baby’s age, items like white chicken meat dices could go over well)

    Have you ever made baby food from food storage? What’s your favorite recipe?

     

    Recipe Sources:

    http://weelicious.com/2012/03/21/mango-blueberry-puree/

    http://tinypaintedfingers.blogspot.com/2013/02/blueberry-spinach-and-apple-puree-baby.html?m=1

    http://lacewineanddrool.blogspot.com/2013/10/baby-food-smorgasbord-homemade.html

    Sources for Making Homemade Baby Food

    http://mychicbump.com/2013/05/the-baby-food-breakdown-by-hello-little-scout/

    http://prepared-housewives.com/2013/10/06/make-baby-food/?preview=true

    Sources about Canning Homemade Baby food Safely

    http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/general/baby_food.html

    http://nchfp.uga.edu//publications/publications_usda.html

    http://wholesomebabyfood.momtastic.com/tipcanning.htm#.UmaWTNJDsuc

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: food storage, recipes, preparedness, emergency preparedness, freeze dried food, DIY, baby food

  • We're on Pinterest!

    Mom and daughter on Pinterest on laptop

    Did you know we’re on Pinterest? Oh, yeah, we’re hip like that. We even have pins of cute puppies and some ecards, just like everybody else. But you know what else we’re pinning? You don’t? Well, that’s because you haven’t checked us out yet. So, howzabout a little tour?

    For starters, our official Pinterest page can be found here: http://www.pinterest.com/emeressentials/.

    For those who don't know, Pinterest is a social media network that allows you to post pictures of products, crafts, or other neat ideas that you can test out at home. You post pictures on "boards" (see the pictures below) so that your followers can see what you're posting. At the moment we have 33 boards (we’ve got a lot on our mind) and more than a thousand followers. And we’re following some of you preparedness enthusiasts, which is really exciting. Here are a few highlights, but we’d love it if you jumped on Pinterest and looked around for yourself.

     

    Our favorite boards

    • Food Storage Recipes – Salmon burgers and fruit salsa? Egg drop soup and Superbowl party treats? Would you believe we can do all that with our food storage? From freeze dried goodies to solar cooking, this board will make rotation a pleasure and emergency eating a treat.

    Pinterest Food Storage Recipes board

    • Tutorials, Ideas and Plans – Our tireless researchers have scoured the Internet for instructions on just about everything you’d need to do, um, ever. Moldy tent? Tipnut.com has a step-by-step tutorial. Drowning buddy? Artofmanliness.com has an infographic. We’ve even pinned a youtube video on how to make a woven half-hitch paracord pouch. I know, right?!
    • Pet Preparedness – We always think about ourselves and children in our preparations, but what about Fido and Fluffy? Check here for tips, resources, and products to keep furry friends happy and healthy in case of an emergency.

    Pinterest Pet Preparedness board

    • No Room for Supplies?  – We’re particularly proud of this board. Do you have, or have you found, a creative idea for home storage? You know, like furniture with hidden compartments, rooms with false walls? Send us a link and it may show up here.
    • Do It Yourself Preparedness – You know we’re a sucker for DIY. Look here for ideas on how to make essentials like laundry soap, or fun kitchen organizers, like this one http://www.pinterest.com/pin/77898268528076372/.

     

    Why you should follow us

    • Preparedness Pantry Blog – Don’t get a chance to check our blog as often as you’d like? Most of our blog posts get pinned to this board. Follow us, and you’ll always know when there’s something new to check out.
    • My Emergency Binder – This board is a hidden treasure. Printables and downloads from our site are available here, along with good ideas for how to organize and store an emergency binder.

    Pinterest Emergency Binder Board

    • Giveaways and Contests  – Best board ever. Follow us on Pinterest, and opportunities to win freebies will pop up magically in your feed. It’s kind of like Christmas. And speaking of…

     

    CHRISTMAS IS COMING!

    (Pardon the all caps, but we’re really, really excited. In fact, we’re so excited that we’ve got five pinboards dedicated to Christmas shopping. It’s never too early, right?)

    • Gifts under $5 , 10 , 25, 50 – Just what they sound like, these boards provide lots of good ideas for Christmas gifts across a range of price points.
    • Stocking stuffers and small gifts – We really like the idea of loading up on little things. These would be perfect for kids’ stockings, a company or church gift exchange, or to have wrapped and on hand for last minute Christmas guests.

    Pinterest Stocking Stuffers board

    • Customer favorites – Still can’t think of anything to buy your family and friends for Christmas? Browse the 100+ plus pins on this board to see what our regulars buy on a usual basis.. There’s bound to be something to please that hard-to-buy-for type here.

    Doesn’t this get you all excited? And here’s one more super-cool thing you can do. Of course, you can repin any of the fun stuff you find on our pinboards. Or you can pin straight from our website! Yeah, you heard that right. Browse the good ol’ beprepared.com, find something fantastic, and hit the ‘pin’ button right on the page.

    Anything else we can do to make your life wonderful?

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: recipes, skills, gifts, preparedness, pet preparedness, emergency preparedness, pinterest

  • Since we are in the heart of autumn, and the weather is starting to get cold, we thought you might like a warm meal to boost your spirits. We’ve been down in the Emergency Essentials kitchen creating a delicious and warm Green and Cheesy Chicken Casserole.

    Don’t let the name fool you . . . when I hear green and cheese together I start to get a little skeptical (as I’m sure a kids would, too, until they taste its cheesy goodness). I assure you that this chicken casserole is good, and the best part is that it’s quick and easy to make using just your food storage ingredients.

    We originally found this recipe on spatualsonparade.blogspot.com and have adapted it to fit our food storage needs.

    Green and Cheesy Chicken Casserole

    Green and Cheesy Chicken Casserole

    2 cups Provident Pantry Freeze Dried Chicken Breast with Rib Meat (Diced)

    1.5-2 cups Provident Pantry Cheese Blend

    1 cup MyChoice Freeze Dried Broccoli (We also loved it with MyChoice Freeze Dried Green Peas)

    1 cup Provident Pantry Instant White Rice

    2 dashes MyChoice Premium Onion Powder (you Don’t want a lot because this stuff can overpower!)

    ¼ tsp MyChoice Premium Garlic Powder

    1/2 tsp MyChoice Mesh Black Pepper

    ¼ tsp MyChoice Mild Chili Powder (optional)

    ¼ tsp MyChoice Italian Seasoning (optional)

    ½ cup water

    1 cup Bread crumbs or crushed crackers (we used about 5 Mountain House Pilot Crackers)

     

    1. Cook Provident Pantry Instant White Rice according to directions on the can (this will take about 20 minutes).

    2. As the rice cooks, reconstitute freeze dried chicken dices, green peas, and cheese blend.

    3. To reconstitute the cheese blend, follow the directions on the can for “cheese sauce” so that you can get a creamy texture for the cheese that’s almost like cheese soup.

    4. Once everything is reconstituted and the rice is done cooking, blend all the rice, chicken, peas, and seasonings together in a large bowl, as you stir, add the ½ cup water. Do NOT include bread crumbs or crackers yet—season to taste.

    5. Place the mixture into a 13 x 9 baking dish. Sprinkle bread crumbs/crushed crackers on top. Bake at 350 for 15 minutes or until warm in the center. Can be served with salad or bread.

     

    Here’s a helpful hint for cooking with food storage meats:

    Food storage meats are often salty to preserve them longer. Hence, whenever you cook a food storage recipe with a ton of seasonings, like this recipe, you’ll want to cut back on the amount of seasoning you use so your meal isn’t super salty. With this recipe, we’ve given you measurements for seasonings, but season to taste and your own liking, using our measurements as general guidelines.

    Enjoy! And tell us what you think of the recipe in the comments below.

    --Angela

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: food storage, recipes, recipe, Food Storage Tips, freeze dried food

  • Since food storage is an essential part of any emergency preparedness plan, it’s important to help your family feel comfortable with eating items from your food storage—before an emergency hits. If you “eat what you store, and store what you eat,” your family will have a sense of security and normalcy if a disaster strikes.

    Making food storage recipes for your weekly meals now will help your family to get familiar with food storage and will also help them understand that food storage doesn’t just mean MREs, wheat, and dry alphabet soup mix. You can make many of your family favorites from food storage.

    Here are some food storage recipes that you can add into your weekly meal rotations. These recipes are quick, easy, and tasty!

    In honor of Preptember™ we cooked up some Prepper’s Pie

    _MG_3220

     

    Prepper’s Pie

    1 Tbsp. Clarified Butter or Olive Oil

    ½ C Freeze Dried Onion

    ½ C Dehydrated or Freeze Dried Carrot

    1 ½ C Provident Pantry Super Sweet Freeze-Dried Corn

    1 C Provident Pantry Freeze-Dried Green Beans (or black beans, pinto beans, or peas; whatever sort of legume you want to throw in there)

    1 ½ C Provident Pantry Freeze-Dried Roast Beef Steak Dices (or freeze-dried ground beef, Beef Crumbles, Beef TVP, or Freeze-Dried Cooked Roast Beef)

    4 C Instant Mashed Potatoes (or more if you like a thicker layer of potatoes)

    1-1  ½ C Provident Pantry Beef Gravy

     

    Directions

    Rehydrate onion, carrot, corn, beans, beef, and mashed potatoes according to directions on the can. Sauté onion in melted clarified butter until golden and clear or slightly browned (don’t have to sauté them too long or else they will become soggy). Add all ingredients BUT the mashed potatoes in a rectangle shallow glass pan. Mix ingredients together by hand so that the distribution of items is even. Bake covered at 300°F for about 30 minutes. Remove from oven and spread the potatoes evenly over top. Return to bake uncovered for about 20 minutes. If potatoes are not golden on the peaks, top broil for a minute or two.

    Variation: Keep the gravy out of the casserole until everything has cooked, then spoon it over the top of the potatoes, or right onto the plate and place the serving of casserole on top.

     

    Like the Prepper’s Pie and want some more food storage recipes to try? Check out some more food storage breakfast, dinner, sides, and dessert recipes below.

    Breakfast

    Cinnamon Apple Oatmeal Bars

    Ham and Cheese Pop-Ups

     

    Dinner

    Easy Hearty Beef Stew

    Pecan Chicken Casserole

     

    Sides

    Food Storage Pasta Primavera

    Bake Beans Western Style Recipe

     

    Dessert

    Raspberry Crisp

    Banana Oat Crumb Cake

     

     

    These are just a few recipes to get you started. Check out the rest of our food storage recipes on our Recipes page.

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: food storage, recipes, wheat, freeze-dried foods

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