Tag Archives: natural disaster

  • Staying Safe as Severe Storms Head for the Midwest

    Even if tornadoes don't pass through, high winds can be just as damaging

    If you call anywhere along the Midwest home, now is a great time to prepare yourself for some bad weather. According to the Weather Channel, severe storms are building across the Midwest putting “35 million Americans in the risk zone” June 3 and 4th.

    Although only a portion of those at risk will see tornadoes, many will still face the damaging results of high speed winds reaching 58 mph with possible gusts bursting between 70-80 mph. That’s enough power to flip a motor home or uproot trees.

    For details about the approaching storm, and to find out whether you’re at risk, check out the Weather Channel’s article, “Severe Weather Forecast: Tornadoes, Derecho Possible Tuesday and Wednesday”.

    But before the storm hits, learn what you can do to prepare:

    --Kim

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: Preparedness In The News, Current Events, Tornado, natural disaster

  • The California Drought and Water Conservation

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    By now, most of you have probably seen this historic image of the California snowpack. In January, NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) released photos showing the dramatic effect the California drought has had on the state’s landscape and snowpack.

    As the picture below shows, much of the greenery, snowpack depth, and precipitation in California’s Sierra region has dramatically decreased within just a year. According to Southern California’s NBC affiliate station, the runoff from the California mountain range is a key source of water for California communities and growers. It accounts for about one-third of the state’s water.

     California Snowpack

    In late March, the Sierra Nevada region received some much needed snowfall, but Mark Cowin, Department of Water Resources director, believed even then that the drought was far from over. Fast forward to early April—surveyors skied into the Sierra Nevada to measure the snowpack level. Surveyors measure the amount of water that melts from the snowpack into the streams and reservoirs below. In April, the snowpack was about 32 percent of the average water content.

    The most recent measurement of the snowpack, taken on May 1st, reveals that the situation is not getting any better. After taking the final measurement of the snowpack for the wet season, California’s Department of Water Resources revealed that the snowpack is now at 18 percent of its average water content level. SoCal’s NBC news station states, “Water managers have said the northern Sierra snowpack that feeds California's major reservoirs is 9 percent of average, and those reservoirs are only half full.”

    Since the snowpack is a major source of water in the state, its depletion is a serious issue for the entire state, especially with the hot and dry summer months approaching.

    As Mark Cowin stated, “This drought is a wake-up call that we all have to take water conservation seriously and make it a way of life.” You can take simple steps now to practice water conservation. Learn how to conserve water by taking our “Gallon Challenge—EE Style” You’ll be surprised by how much water you use in a typical day, especially when you only have one gallon for your cooking, drinking, and sanitation needs. Use this challenge to determine how much water to have in your family’s home water storage.

     

    If you would like to know what to do to begin conserving water, check out this article to get started: 45 Ways to Conserve Water.

    What tips do you have for conserving water?

    --Angela

    Photo Courtesy of National Journal

     

    Sources

    http://www.nationaljournal.com/energy/the-california-drought-as-seen-from-space-20140204

    http://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/local/Sierra-Nevada-Snowpack-California-Drought-257500871.html

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: California Drought, drought, natural disaster

  • How does the CA Drought Affect your Grocery List?

    This post is the third installment of a three-part series highlighting the 2014 California Drought. Check out Part Two of the Series: The Effects of California's Driest Year

    The California drought rages on, leaving lands dry and barren. Farm/ranch owners and laborers throughout the west are directly impacted by the drought. The owners have to slaughter or sell off livestock for lack of feed and refrain from planting their usual crops, which means cutting their own income and providing less work for laborers and truckers.

    Shortages naturally drive prices up at the market, and you’ve probably already seen higher costs on meats, poultry, fruits, vegetables, nuts, and dairy products as farmers produce less. (It takes from two to twelve months for the full effects of a drought to become obvious at the marketplace.) California’s produce industry is normally a $44.7 billion annual business, but as the drought continues, that number will shrink dramatically.

     

    California Water Agriculture

    Drought in California's Central Valley

    On May 19th, 2014, the results of a study conducted by the University of California’s Davis’ Center for Watershed Sciences reported that the California drought could cause as many as 14,500 full-time and seasonal jobs to be lost. In addition to job loss, the drought will cost California’s Central Valley (one of the most affluent farming communities in the world) to lose $1.7 billion dollars.

    Since many farmers in the Central Valley rely on irrigation, rather than rain to grow their crops, they are purchasing supplies from federal and state projects to pump water from the San Joaquin-Sacramento River Delta or are pumping water from wells—but these are costly ventures.

    California’s farm industry makes up $1.9 trillion of the state’s gross domestic product for the year, and as such, the governor is helping the farmers by easing some of the state’s water rights regulations. But as we know, the decrease in farming and produce production from the California farm industry does not just impact California alone.

    CBS News suggests that “the direction of national food prices [are less than certain] as the drought grinds on. California agriculture produces close to half of all the fruits, nuts, and vegetables grown in America…”

    Prices Climb as the Drought Rages on

    As prices increase, some shoppers will look for alternative sources or choices, while others will simply do without their usual fruits, vegetables, and nuts. Customers may simply refuse to buy overpriced produce, allowing it to get old on the shelves rather than pay what is asked.

    California exports a tremendous volume of produce and meat overseas—and it remains to be seen how foreign customers will react to price increases. Will vendors and restaurant owners still order from California, or turn to other temperate climate sources such as Spain, Italy, and Israel? And once their status in the industry is lost, will California be able to regain it when the rain returns? Since western droughts can last for decades, a lot of things seem up in the air.

    According to Scientific American, California received little to no rain during the region’s wet season from December to March. And by the beginning of April, nearly 70 percent of the state was in extreme to exceptional drought. As of May, the entire state is now experiencing “severe” drought.

     

    In the meantime, it might be a very good idea to purchase some long-lasting, freeze-dried fruits, veggies, and meats before those items become scarce and prices skyrocket. Now is also the time to start conserving water wherever you can—every little bit will help. Try the “Gallon Challenge—EEStyle” to see if you and your family can each survive on a gallon of water for one day!

    -Sharon, Kim, and Angela

    Sources:

    www.blogs.usda.gov/2012/08/10/us-drought-and-your-food-costs

    www.theundergroundsite.com/california-drought-could-impact-world-food-prices

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/01/30/california-drought-effects-500-years_n_4647529.html

    www.trippapparel.com/2014/18697

    www.earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Feature/LakeMead

    www.usatoday.com/story/theoval/2014/02/14/obama-california-drought-aid-vilsack/5479121

    www.nytimes.com/2014/02/15/us/politics/obama-to-announce-aid-for-drought-racked-california.html?r=0

    www.westernfarmpress.com/blog/obama-administration-misses-boat-drought-assistance

    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/california-drought-taking-a-toll-on-jobs-economy/

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/05/20/us-usa-california-drought-jobs-idUSBREA4J01M20140520

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/100-percent-of-california-now-in-highest-stages-of-drought/

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: California Drought, drought, natural disaster

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