Tag Archives: Hurricane

  • 5 Things you May not Know about Hurricane Season

    5 Things you May not Know about Hurricane Season

    During my regular news trolling last week, I came across an AP headline that several of the big outlets had latched onto, titled “5 Things to Know About Hurricane Season.” You can read the same article from ABC News, Yahoo news, or The Washington Times, depending on your preferred association. But no matter how you access it, the upshot seems to be that it’s a year to breathe easy. El Niño’s back, which, the article claims, means warmer weather and both fewer and less intense storms. This is great news, considering hurricane season officially began June 1st, and I would really rather work on my tan than stock up on emergency candles during all this beautiful weather.

    Except maybe not.

    The Weather Channel, acting in its official capacity as the smart kid that nobody likes, has put out its own “5 Things” list, which isn’t, but could be subtitled, “Don’t Get Too Comfortable Yet.” In particular, the article points out how complicated and unpredictable a factor El Niño is (depending on geographical location, the warmer currents of El Niño can either lessen or increase the severity of storms), and reminds us that “below average” storm systems can still be devastating.

    For those of us who live in areas that are at all prone to hurricanes, this is not the time to get casual in our preparations. Fingers crossed that we don’t have a repeat of 2004, but, as the Weather Channel put it, “Perhaps a big anniversary will remind Americans it's possible, and it could happen again.”

    In case you missed the re-post a couple of months ago, our article, “How to Prepare for a Hurricane” includes a thorough list of downloadable resources and links to our 5-part Hurricane Preparedness mini-series.

     

    What are your best tips for hurricane preparedness?

     

    -Stacey Birk

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: hurricane preparedness, Hurricane, natural disaster

  • Your Efforts Are Making a Difference in the Philippines

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    Chalkboard with an image of the Philippine islands and the words "Thank You"

     

    Thank you so much for the efforts you made to help us outfit Charity Vision’s advance team. Those who were already on the ground in the Philippines are setting up their base camp and have connected with a local church so they have a safe “home base” for their operation.

    We delivered the supplies we promised to CharityVision last night, and the remaining members of the advance team (those who weren’t already in the Philippines) will fly out with those supplies on Saturday. Additional contributions that come in today will help to provide even more supplies.  Here is an excerpt from an email sent by one of the group members who is already in the Philippines. We hope it gives you an idea of what they'll be doing:

     

    "Here's the news so far!

    My goal is to have a base camp established and staffed by the time you [the rest of the advance team] arrive in Ormoc. A local church is organizing volunteers to handle facilities, outreach, internal security (along with police), organizing and controlling crowds, [and] sourcing victims to treat. Their women’s group will be in charge of water, cooking, cleaning and assisting with medical triage.

    The goal for those of you who are medical will be to hit the ground running. Those who are logistics or search and rescue will be making sorties into areas that have not had relief to clear roads and bring in those in the worst shape.

    Given the security concerns, my goal is to bring a massive show of relief to the city… We'll create a distribution model for health care and food. In order to receive either they [will] have to have been screened by the local volunteers and given a pass to get into the facility."

     

    You may also be interested to know that the supplies we send with CharityVision will be left behind in the Philippines when their team leaves, so those tools and supplies can continue to benefit the local communities.

    Thank you for your efforts, donations, and purchases—not only are they making this advance team’s medical, logistics, and search efforts possible, but they are facilitating the efforts of the larger group who will follow them to the Philippines shortly!

     

    We also want to give a special shout out to these vendors, who partnered with us to provide many additional supplies to the CharityVision team:

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: philippines, typhoon, Relief Efforts, Hurricane

  • Hurricane Sandy: Neighbors to the Rescue!

    Large Group of Happy People standing together.

    How well do you know your neighbors?

    A recent poll conducted by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research found that during the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, residents in New York and New Jersey believed that their neighbors were more helpful in providing assistance and support than the state and national government.

    While sixty-three percent of the 2,025 individuals polled in this survey suggested that they turned to friends, families, or neighbors close to their homes, only seven percent said that they contacted their state government during the storm. Additionally, only nineteen percent of those surveyed sought help from the federal government.

    Commonly, in disaster situations, the perceived notion is that a “fend for yourself” attitude comes out in the community. However, this survey found that seventy-seven percent of people reported that the Hurricane brought out the best among their neighbors.

    Neighbors helped each other by sharing food, water, shelter, generators, or access to power. In neighborhoods hardest hit by the storm, sharing was even more common. Many people stated that they really got to know their neighbors as they bonded to help each other through this crisis.

    The most important point that we can take away from this survey is that according to the Associated Press, “data showed that neighborhoods lacking in social cohesion and trust generally had a more difficult time recovering. People in slowly recovering neighborhoods reported greater levels of hoarding of food and water, looting, stealing, and vandalism, compared with neighborhoods that recovered more quickly.”

    Hurricane Sandy teaches us that now is the time to start getting to know your neighbors. Learn about what resources and skills that you can pool in order to help your community survive in case a disaster hits. To learn how to create a community preparedness plan or join our group program to prepare with your neighbors, check out these resources:

    http://beprepared.com/group-program

    http://beprepared.com/blog/1601/baby-steps-to-a-preparedness-network/

    http://beprepared.com/blog/6506/survival-swap-meet/

    http://beprepared.com/media/wysiwyg/PDF/NeighborhoodEmergencyPlan.pdf

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: Hurricane, Neighborhood Emergency Plan, Emergency plan, group program