Tag Archives: Food Storage Tips

  • Group Specials for November

    We’re offering four great products for group specials this month. Alert your group members to get their orders in early since these items will go fast, and you simply can’t afford to pass them by!

    What luxury to have delicious, real butter stored without refrigeration on your shelves, ready at any time to open and enjoy! Red Feather™ Canned Butter is guaranteed to last for at least two years in cool and constant temperatures. This limited supply was manufactured between November of 2012 and February of 2013, so each can has a guaranteed shelf life of at least 12 to 15 months. Determine how much butter your family would use during that period, and order accordingly. Each 12-ounce can is selling for only $5.00, a saving of 35% over the regular price of $7.50 per can. Your group must order at least 24 cans in order to get this price.

    Red Feather Butter

     

    We’re continuing our sale on Provident Pantry® Freeze Dried Green Peas. These peas are crunchy and fun to snack on right from the can. They’re also an excellent side dish or addition to soups, casseroles, salads, or stir-fry. If you’re looking to add more vitamins and nutrients to your diet, these peas are a good source of Vitamins A and C, protein, fiber, and iron. This month, they’re on sale for $12.00 each, 35% off the regular price of $18.50 per can. An order of only 12 cans per group gets you this terrific bargain, so if you missed them last month or want more, here’s your chance!

    Provident Pantry Freeze Dried Green Peas

     

    Another popular holdover from October is our brand-new product, the Small (gallon-size) Metalized Bags. These bags are perfect for preserving freeze dried or dehydrated foods once the can has been opened. The convenient zip-lock top means no re-sealing is necessary. A package of 10 bags is only $5.00 each, 41% off the regular price of $8.50 per package of 10 bags. It’s a great time to stock up on these! At least ten packs must be ordered per group to get this excellent discount.

    Small Metallized bags

     

    Back by popular demand, and in limited quantities, our lightweight breakfast packets of Granola with Milk and Bananas LRP or Granola with Milk and Blueberries LRP are on sale fro $1.25 each (a huge saving of 57% from the original price of $2.97 per pack)! “LRP” stands for “Long Range Patrol.” Like MREs, LRPs are developed for military use. This means they are lightweight and easy to pack for camping, hiking, or backpacking trips. They also are a great addition to your grab-and-go bag, car emergency kit, or home storage. Simply add water and enjoy. A total of 30 pouches must be purchased per group to get this whopping discount. Feel free to mix and match flavors to meet the 30-pouch quota.

     Granola and Banana LRP

    Don’t delay! Group orders should be placed by November 21. Since some of these items have limited quantities, the earlier you place your order, the better!

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: emergency preparedness supplies, freeze dried food, Food Storage Tips, sale, group specials, group program, monthly sales

  • Green and Cheesy Chicken Casserole Recipe

    Since we are in the heart of autumn, and the weather is starting to get cold, we thought you might like a warm meal to boost your spirits. We’ve been down in the Emergency Essentials kitchen creating a delicious and warm Green and Cheesy Chicken Casserole.

    Don’t let the name fool you . . . when I hear green and cheese together I start to get a little skeptical (as I’m sure a kids would, too, until they taste its cheesy goodness). I assure you that this chicken casserole is good, and the best part is that it’s quick and easy to make using just your food storage ingredients.

    We originally found this recipe on spatualsonparade.blogspot.com and have adapted it to fit our food storage needs.

    Green and Cheesy Chicken Casserole

    Green and Cheesy Chicken Casserole

    2 cups Provident Pantry Freeze Dried Chicken Breast with Rib Meat (Diced)

    1.5-2 cups Provident Pantry Cheese Blend

    1 cup MyChoice Freeze Dried Broccoli (We also loved it with MyChoice Freeze Dried Green Peas)

    1 cup Provident Pantry Instant White Rice

    2 dashes MyChoice Premium Onion Powder (you Don’t want a lot because this stuff can overpower!)

    ¼ tsp MyChoice Premium Garlic Powder

    1/2 tsp MyChoice Mesh Black Pepper

    ¼ tsp MyChoice Mild Chili Powder (optional)

    ¼ tsp MyChoice Italian Seasoning (optional)

    ½ cup water

    1 cup Bread crumbs or crushed crackers (we used about 5 Mountain House Pilot Crackers)

     

    1. Cook Provident Pantry Instant White Rice according to directions on the can (this will take about 20 minutes).

    2. As the rice cooks, reconstitute freeze dried chicken dices, green peas, and cheese blend.

    3. To reconstitute the cheese blend, follow the directions on the can for “cheese sauce” so that you can get a creamy texture for the cheese that’s almost like cheese soup.

    4. Once everything is reconstituted and the rice is done cooking, blend all the rice, chicken, peas, and seasonings together in a large bowl, as you stir, add the ½ cup water. Do NOT include bread crumbs or crackers yet—season to taste.

    5. Place the mixture into a 13 x 9 baking dish. Sprinkle bread crumbs/crushed crackers on top. Bake at 350 for 15 minutes or until warm in the center. Can be served with salad or bread.

     

    Here’s a helpful hint for cooking with food storage meats:

    Food storage meats are often salty to preserve them longer. Hence, whenever you cook a food storage recipe with a ton of seasonings, like this recipe, you’ll want to cut back on the amount of seasoning you use so your meal isn’t super salty. With this recipe, we’ve given you measurements for seasonings, but season to taste and your own liking, using our measurements as general guidelines.

    Enjoy! And tell us what you think of the recipe in the comments below.

    --Angela

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: freeze dried food, Food Storage Tips, recipe, recipes, food storage

  • The (Nearly) Lost Art of Bread Making

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    Assortment of Breads

    What could smell more appetizing than the fragrance of baking bread?

    It conjures memories of visits to Grandma’s house or our favorite bakery, but to the novice, the prospect of making bread seems daunting. This fear of not having your bread turn out as perfectly as Grandma's is what has made bread making a (nearly) lost art. Actually, with a few tips, it isn’t difficult—and it’s immensely rewarding! Using a bread mixer can expedite the process, but you can also make excellent bread by hand. If you’re interested in a high-quality mixer, consider the “Bosch Universal Mixer.” Otherwise, you will need a large mixing bowl, a sturdy spoon, measuring cups and spoons, several loaf pans, and a non-stick surface on which to knead the bread (a pastry sheet, parchment paper, an oiled baking sheet or a clean, floured countertop should work).

     

    Whole Wheat Bread

    Ingredients:

    7-8 cups of wheat flour freshly ground if possible, medium-texture. If you’re nervous about using all whole wheat at first you may substitute 2-3 cups of white flour for the same amount of whole wheat.

    1/3 cup granulated lecithin or 3-4 Tablespoons of dough enhancer. (Our Provident Pantry Dough Enhancer helps make fluffier and stronger dough with great flavor and less of a tendency to be dry and crumbly when baked. It also adds to the shelf-life of the finished bread. This product is a blend of natural ingredients, not chemicals.)

    1/3 cup oil (canola is preferred)

    1/3 cup honey, molasses, or sugar

    1 tablespoon salt

    3 tablespoons yeast You may want to test your yeast before mixing to be sure it’s live and viable. In a large (4-cup) measuring cup, combine 1 cup of warm (not hot) water and 3 tablespoons of yeast. Wait about ten minutes and if the yeast has grown and puffed up to the top of the cup it will definitely leaven your bread.

     

    Directions:

    In large mixing bowl combine 3 cups warm water, lecithin OR dough enhancer, oil, honey, molasses, OR sugar, and salt. (Mix with an electric mixer if you have one.)

    Stir in 5 cups of flour and mix until moistened, using a spoon if it gets too thick.  Let this mixture rest for a few minutes.

    Add yeast and water from measuring cup and mix well.

    Add about 1 ½ cups more flour, stirring until dough begins to pull away from the sides of the bowl, adding small amounts of flour at a time until that happens. (You don’t want your dough to be too stiff or the bread will be dry.  The dough should be about the consistency of soft chewed bubble gum—stretchy and pliable.)

    Oil your hands well and turn the dough out onto an oiled or floured surface. Knead gently with heels of your hands, then fold dough over and punch to get rid of air bubbles—this may take 8 to 10 minutes until the dough is satiny and holds together.

    With oiled hands, divide dough and form into balls that fill about 2/3 of the greased loaf pans you are using without topping the rim. You don’t have to pat down the dough—it will expand to fill the pan as it rises and bakes. Rising times are approximate, depending upon temperature and humidity in your kitchen. If it’s a cool day, you can place your bread to rise on the top rack of an unheated oven with a pan of very warm water on the lower rack. 80 degrees is the perfect temperature for dough to rise.

    At this point, if you’d like to make some dinner rolls you can form them as you desire:  Three small balls placed in the cup of a greased muffin tin will give a cloverleaf shape. A ball formed with an oiled ice-cream scoop will give a round dinner-roll shape. If your menu includes hamburger buns, roll part of your dough out on a floured surface about ¾ inch thick, and use a round cutter (a large jar lid will work) to cut the buns out. (Buns can be topped with sesame or poppy seeds or sautéed onion bits if desired.)  Carefully move dinner rolls or buns to an oiled baking sheet and set that plus your loaf pans on a double-thickness of towels in a warm, level place. Cover with another towel. Allow the dough to rise for at least 45 minutes or until it has doubled in bulk. Bake as follows:

    Bread:  approximately 45 minutes at 350 degrees

    Dinner rolls:  12-15 minutes at 400 degrees

    Hamburger buns:  20-25 minutes at 375 degrees

    Check your bread about halfway through baking time to see if the top is browning too quickly.  If it is, cover with a piece of aluminum foil to slow that down. When bread should be done, tap the top crust—if it gives a “hollow” sound your bread is done.

    Turn bread out onto racks to cool immediately as allowing them to cool in the pan will cause a “steaming” effect of the crust. Bread may be sliced as soon as it is cool enough to handle.  Prepare to enjoy!

     

    Storing your bread:  Completely cooled bread should be wrapped in foil or plastic.  Do not refrigerate unless you know you can’t use the bread within a few days. Bread can be frozen. Wrap well and freeze for up to 3 months. Unbaked dough can also be frozen successfully for up to 3 or 4 weeks.

    Yummy variations: 

    Cinnamon Rolls

    Roll half the dough out on a nonstick surface in a rectangular shape about ½ inch thick.  Spread with softened butter or margarine and sprinkle generously with cinnamon and sugar.  Add raisins or nuts if desired.  Beginning at one end of the rectangle roll the dough into a cylinder shape, then cut into slices about ¾ inch thick.  Allow to rise till double in bulk, and bake 18-20 minutes at 375 degrees. Frost as desired.  (Do not freeze frosted rolls—frost them once they’re thawed.)

    Orange Rolls

    Hold the cinnamon, nuts, and raisins, and instead add a sprinkle of orange zest (finely-grated orange peel) to the buttered, sugared rectangle of dough. Roll, cut and let rise and bake like cinnamon rolls. Frost with a powdered sugar/orange juice glaze.

    Dilly Bread

    Use half white and half whole-wheat flour, ¼ cup honey or sugar, and add 1 beaten egg, 3/4 cup cottage cheese, ½ tsp. baking soda, 1 tablespoon dried minced onion and 1 Tablespoon dill weed (and/or dill seed, if preferred) to the first mix of ingredients as you prepare your dough. After dough is kneaded, allow it to rise in an oiled bowl until double in bulk, then punch down and knead again.  Form into 2 large balls and place each in an oiled round casserole dish. Allow to rise again for about 40 minutes then brush with melted butter and sprinkle with salt. Bake at 375 degrees for 50-60 minutes.  This bread smells heavenly baking and is delicious with cheese, pot roast or ham—or just buttered for a snack or treat.

     

    Sources:

    www.foodnetwork.com/recipe-collections/bread/index.htm

    www.ehow.com/way_5157110_homemade-whole-wheat-bread.html

    www.cooksrecipes.com/bread/dilly_bread_recipe

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: Food Storage Tips, wheat, recipes, food storage

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