Tag Archives: floods

  • Keeping Your Head Above Water with Flood Insurance

    Here’s a fun little pop quiz from FloodSmart.gov.

    True or False?

    • In the last five years, all fifty states have experienced some level of flooding.
    • Everyone lives in a flood zone.
    • Most homeowner’s insurance policies do not cover floods.

    If you answered “true” to all of the above, you get a gold star. And those aren’t even the scariest flood-related facts from the National Flood Insurance Program’s official site. Even more persuasive are the numbers, like $42,000(average flood insurance claim),4% (the interest rate on a federal disaster assistance loan, the typical relief source for the uninsured), and 1/3 (the fraction of flood disaster relief recipients who live outside high risk areas).

    Flooding stands in its own category of natural disasters, as it’s commonly an effect, rather than a cause. That means that it’s usually paired with something else disastrous—a result of hurricanes, earthquakes, mudslides, even avalanches. That makes floods dangerous, expensive, and sneaky.

    All of this is why the federal government has put together this super helpful site. Because so few private insurers offer flood insurance (read more about that here), the NFIP was born to help fill the gap. Here’s a quick tour of what FloodSmart.gov offers and why you should take a peek, whether or not you live on a flood plain.

    • Regularly updated flood maps, complete with helpful designations and explanations. Find out whether you live in a high, low, or undetermined risk area and what each of those categories actually means. For example, a high risk area is one where you have a 1 in 4 risk of flooding in the course of a 30 year mortgage. Good to know!
    • Interactive damage cost calculator. Just pick a sample home size and the level of the flood—anywhere from an inch to four feet—and this handy graphic will show you the approximate cost of any flood. Try entering the smallest square footage and the shallowest flood, and prepare to have your mind blown.
    • All about residential coverage. Whether you own or rent your home, look here to find out what’s covered, how much you can expect to pay, and what steps to take to find coverage—including a neat little agent locator that lets you search by zip code. My first try brought up a well-known insurance agent in my own neighborhood!

     

    Flooding and flash flooding can happen during any season of the year. And because most policies require at least 30 days to take effect, the best time to look into flood insurance is always now!

    - Stacey

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: floods, flooding

  • iStock_000016955692XSmall_Blonde_Woman_Drinks_Water

    A couple of weeks ago Popular Mechanics wrote about Perforene which Lockheed Martin is developing as a new desalination technology using reverse osmosis.  Here’s how it works. 

    A membrane separates two chambers, and the side holding the salt water is subjected to pressure, forcing the water to pass through the membrane and leave the salt, which is too large to cross the barrier. 

    (Aside: The Hydropack sold by Emergency Essentials works in a similar way, but through forward osmosis. And to be clear, you cannot use the Hydropack in salt water.)

    By making desalination more efficient and less costly, this new technology can provide clean water to more people around the world. (Read more: Lockheed's Better, Faster Way to Desalinate Water)

    But lack of water in the U.S. is still a concern. NOAA published their Spring 2013 Outlook and they’re predicting a warm spring. Unfortunately that means warmer-than-average weather and drought conditions for parts of the country. (Watch the video for details.) For areas with snow, a warm spring might also mean flooding.

    Possible drought in your area means, on a household level, that your garden and lawns might get less water this year. Flooding brings possible contamination of water lines, though they are generally safe. I would take this as a nudge to start storing water. Even if you don’t end up using the water for drinking, you can use the water on your garden, houseplants, or for washing your car.

    Now the question is, “How should I store water?” Emergency Essentials has three articles on how to properly store and purify water.

    1. Water Storage Overview
    2. Water Storage Options 
    3. Water Filtration and Purification

    You may also want to check out FEMA’s website.

    And last, but not least, click here to read more on Emergency Essentials newest water storage option! (A lot of Emergency Essential Employees are clamoring to get one.)

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: water, water storage, purifier, floods