Tag Archives: fire

  • How to Survive a Burning Ship

    How to Survive a Burning Ship

    More than 400 people were safely evacuated from a car ferry that caught fire Sunday off Greece’s Adriatic coast. Poor weather conditions made rescue difficult, but Italian and Greek helicopters and rescue teams managed to bring most of the passengers to safety. Unfortunately, there were 10 casualties.

    The boat drifted in rough seas between Italy and Greece as passengers waited to be rescued. The cause of the fire is still unknown, and attempts to tow the ship to shore ended when the tow cables broke overnight. Italian and Albanian magistrates are debating whether to continue attempting to tow the boat for investigation.

    The U.S. Coast Guard’s 2011 Recreational Boating Statistics Report listed 218 boating accidents that year involving a fire or explosion. Though there were losses in the ferry fire, passengers and rescuers worked together to bring most of the passengers safely to shore.

    The problem with boat fires is that you cannot simply run across the street to escape it; the only way to escape a boat fire is to await rescue or go overboard, which can be nearly as dangerous.

     

    HOW TO SURVIVE A BURNING SHIP

    Plan Ahead

    Thinking ahead of the best way to respond to a boat fire increases the probability you’ll remain calm and react correctly should one break out. Boat fires can go from smoke to inferno in minutes, so every moment counts. If possible, test safety equipment ahead of time to ensure you will know how to use it in the heat of the moment.

    Wear a Life Jacket

    First and foremost, put on a life jacket in case you do need to go (or accidentally go) overboard. Life jackets are designed to keep your head above water and in a position that helps you breathe when in the water. Keep in mind that adult-sized life jackets are not suitable for children. A life jacket should fit snugly and won’t allow the child’s chin or ears to slip through.

    Locate an Escape Route

    If the boat is docked, escape is simple. You can even bypass the life jackets and just get off the boat. In this case, call the firefighters to handle the fire for you; professionals are always a good bet.

    If the boat is at sea or in other deep waters when fire breaks out, escape can be more challenging—and, of course, the bigger the boat, the more complex your route can be. Every time you step foot on a large boat, like a ferry or cruiseliner, take note of the emergency plan (which should be posted in a public area of a ferry, as well as posted in your state room on a cruise ship), and pay attention during the “boring” emergency practice drill you’re required to attend on a cruise.

    Attempt to Extinguish the Flames

    If a fire extinguisher is handy, aim it at the base of the flames and discharge it, using a back and forth sweeping motion. Remember P.A.S.S:
    • Pull pin,
    • Aim at base of fire
    • Squeeze handle
    • Sweep side to side
    Never use water on an electric, gasoline, grease, or oil fire. Fifty-five percent of boat fires are caused by wiring and appliance malfunctions. Be sure that the fire extinguisher you are using is appropriate for the type of fire you’re facing. If the fire cannot be contained, the boat will be lost.

    Watch this video on methods for fighting various boat fires:

    Move Away from the Fire

    If the fire is uncontainable, move away from it, closing doors and hatches behind you, and move windward if possible. At this point, you’ll need to decide whether to wait for rescue or abandon ship.

    Bear in mind that the smoke and chemicals released in the fire can be more dangerous than the fire itself.

    Abandon Ship, if Necessary

    If possible, enter the life raft directly from the boat; avoid swimming to reach the raft. Bring a radio distress beacon on board the raft along with emergency supplies, such as important medication, water, a Swiss army knife, a whistle, a flashlight and a first-aid kit (many life rafts and escape boats will already be equipped with these supplies; that’s the kind of information you’ll want to know in advance). If you are traveling in foreign waters, bring travel documents as well.

    Once on board the raft, get to a safe distance from the burning boat. Try to stay dry and stay warm by huddling with other raft passengers. If there is no supply of drinking water on the raft or escape boat, arrange to collect rainwater and ration it to a maximum of half a quart per person per day.

    Preparedness is Key

    The more you are prepared for a boat fire when traveling by sea, the more likely you’ll able to handle it calmly, should it happen. More than 400 passengers aboard the car ferry did the right thing in a tough situation and lived to tell about it.

    Sources
    http://www.boatus.com/seaworthy/fire/
    http://www.nordhavn.com/resources/tech/boat_fires.php
    http://www.boat-ed.com/pennsylvania/studyGuide/Preventing-Fires-and-What-to-Do-if-Fire-Erupts-on-Your-Boat/101039_101039194
    http://threesheetsnw.com/blog/2014/05/what-to-do-when-your-boat-catches-fire/
    http://www.soundingsonline.com/boat-shop/sea-savvy/292025-fire-on-board-heres-what-to-do
    http://www.uscgboating.org/safety/life_jacket_wear_wearing_your_life_jacket.aspx

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: survival at sea, fire, Current Events

  • 5 Ways to Start a Fire with Water

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    5 Ways to Start a Fire with Water

    A crucial skill to have in practically any emergency situation is knowing how to build a fire. Whether you get lost overnight on a ski trip or your car runs out of gas as you pack up to leave your campsite, knowing how to build a fire and stay warm could save your life.

    So what’s the best way to build a fire? “Building” a fire typically comes in three stages: gather the materials, lay the fire, and then start it. Check out our Insight Article to learn “How to Build a Fire” using these three stages.

    However, in an emergency situation, there’s one other item that could actually help you start a fire that many overlook—water. It’s true. Grant Thompson, from thekingofrandom.com, shows five ways you can start a fire using water. Check it out:

    There you have it: five ways water can start a fire. Four of Thompson’s five fire starting methods show you how to use water as a magnifying glass to spark a fire, letting the power of the sun do all the work (or at least a lot of it!). But e But B ven if there’s cloud cover, you aren’t out of luck. With just a few supplies you can still ignite a fire in seconds.

    If you plan to use water to help you start a fire in an emergency, make sure to add the following supplies to your emergency gear so you are completely prepared.

    Method 5:

    • A light bulb. Make sure your bulb has been rinsed and cleaned according to Thompson’s directions. Cushion the bulb with fabric, grocery sacks, or other forms of padding to keep it from breaking and place it in a small container before you put it in your emergency supplies.
    • A balloon to cap off the end of the light bulb after you’ve filled it with water

    Method 4

    • Plastic wrap
    • A bowl

    Method 3

    • Plastic wrap
    • A picture frame

    *For this method, make sure you have a way to securely attach the plastic wrap to the frame and to heat water.

    Method 2

    • A juice bottle (that looks like a bubble) filled with water

    Method 1

    • Toilet paper
    • Toilet paper roll
    • Small chunks of sodium
    • Jar lid

     

    Caution! Playing with fires is dangerous so make sure to have proper safety gear (a fire extinguisher, goggles, and leather gloves) with you when practicing these new ways to start a fire. Also, make sure to light fires in a cleared area away from flammable objects or dry grass.

    These are some fun, unique methods you can use to start a fire, but don’t forget about the traditional methods as well. Adding items such as the Sparkie, the P-25 Strike Master or FiredUp! firestarters to your emergency supplies are reliable ways to get a roaring fire and warmth fast. (Or, taking a hint from Thompson, how about a magnifying glass?)

     

     

    Sources:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HCyHC7lnMyQ

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: fire starting, fire, emergency preparedness, skills

  • Learn, Don't Burn: Fire Safety Tips for the Home

    Prevent house fires with these fire safety tips

    “The United States has the highest fatality rate from fire in the industrial world. Why? Because we spend most of our money responding to fires, not preventing them.” This statement by David Osborne, Sr. Advisor to Vice President Al Gore, shows us where our priorities should lie in keeping our homes and families safe from fire: prevention!

    Here’s a list of fire safety tips you can use to prevent a house fire.

    Fire Safety in the Kitchen

    • Never leave cooking food unattended, especially when frying (overheated oil is the leading cause of kitchen fires).
    • Keep it clean—keep stove and nearby counter surfaces free of clutter, grease, and combustible items such as cans of baking spray, bug spray, hairspray, or air freshener.
    • Use your stove or oven timer; we humans can get easily distracted.
    • Wear close-fitting clothing when cooking; loose robes and billowing sleeves can ignite easily over the stove.

    If a pan fire erupts while you’re cooking, act quickly to prevent the fire from spreading. Here’s what you should do:

    DO:

    1. Cover the pan with a lid or another pan turned upside down.
    2. Turn off the heat.
    3. If the first two don’t extinguish the fire, douse it with a fire-extinguisher or throw baking soda on it.

    And a few things you should never do with a kitchen fire:

    • DO NOTsubstitute flour or sugar for baking soda to douse the fire—1 cup of either has the explosive power of 2 sticks of dynamite!
    • DO NOT spray an oil fire with water; it will splatter the hot oil and spread the fire.
    • DO NOT run with a pan of oil; there’s too much danger of dripping, spilling, and spreading the fire or burning yourself.

     

    Fire Safety in the Laundry Room

    • Your dryer duct must vent to the outdoors, never to a room in your home, as it can contain a combination of combustible gases.
    • Avoid plastic duct work for your dryer; metal is much safer.
    • Keep duct and dryer lint-trap free of lint. Periodically a professional should help you clean between the dryer drum and the heating element.
    • Install a smoke detector in the area.

     

    Fireplaces and Candles

    • Never leave a fire unattended, whether it’s in your fireplace or a small candle sitting on the table.
    • Make certain your fireplace flue is open before lighting a fire.
    • Place candles or candle-warmers on a flat, non-combustible surface away from cloth, paper, cardboard, or even Styrofoam.
    • Use a sturdy hearth screen to keep logs from rolling out of a fireplace.
    • Perform regular checkups on your chimney, fireplace, or woodstove. All need annual cleaning and monthly inspections in case of obstructions or damage.
    • Never burn paper, trash, or green wood in fireplaces.
    • Extinguish the fire before you leave the area. Let the ashes cool completely before disposing of them in a metal container outside the home.

     

    Electronics and Appliances

    • Be a smart shopper! Buy appliances that have been evaluated and approved by a nationally-recognized laboratory such as UL (Underwriters Laboratories).
    • Check labels of appliances for manufacturer’s safety tips.
    • Replace all frayed wires and damaged plugs.
    • Use 3-prong plugs in 3-prong outlets, and 2-prong plugs in 2-prong outlets.
    • Keep portable space heaters 4 feet away from combustible surfaces and objects.
    • Ensure that your space heater has an automatic turn-off feature in case it should tip over.
    • Do not allow your space heater to overheat, and use in a well-ventilated room.
    • If your heater operates on kerosene, use only clear K-1 Kerosene, which is the cleanest, purest form of the fuel. It should be clear as water and show no “floaties” or contaminants. Do not substitute gasoline for kerosene.

     

    Smoke Alarms

    • Have several in your house, near the kitchen, laundry room, bedrooms, and any room that has a fireplace or wood-burning stove.
    • Use dual-sensor smoke alarms, as they use both photoelectric and ionization sensors, increasing the chance of catching a fire in its beginning stage.
    • Test smoke alarms once a month and replace yearly (except for those containing non-replaceable 10-year lithium batteries).
    • Never disable a smoke alarm, especially when cooking.
    • There are special smoke alarms for the disabled—Loud, unmistakable alarms for visually-impaired people, visual alarms or vibrating pads for the hearing-impaired, and alarms with outdoor strobe lights to alert neighbors of a problem in the home of a person with severe disabilities. Many alarms can be connected to an alarm service that alerts first responders to a need.

     

    If You Smoke

    • Smoke outdoors for the most safety.
    • Never smoke in bed or in a recliner where you might be tempted to snooze.
    • Stay alert. If you feel especially sleepy, whether due to medication, drinking, or sleep-deprivation, put out your cigarette/cigar.
    • Snuff cigarettes out completely in sand or water; don’t toss burning butts out your car window, into a trash can, or anywhere else.
    • Never smoke in an area where oxygen is being used. Even if the canister is turned off, the area is still more vulnerable to explosion.

     

    Getting Out Safely

    • Establish an evacuation plan. Draw up an escape plan for your home, with all exits marked. Establish two ways of exiting each room if possible, especially bedrooms.
    • Discuss escape plans with your family, and rehearse. Teach the stop, drop, and roll technique in case clothing catches fire.

    These practices may not stop every single house fire, but they’ll help prevent those that can be prevented—that are caused by human error or negligence—and help your family survive if a fire should erupt in spite of all your precautions.

    Have you had an experience with a house fire? Do you have any tips to add to the list?

    For more details on these tips, see the original articles links below:
    www.complianceandsafety.com/safety-tips/fire-safety-tips.php
    www.ameriburn.org/preventionBurnAwareness.php

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: house fires, National Burn Week, fire, Fire Preparedness, Fire Safety, emergency preparedness, Survival, preparedness

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