Tag Archives: Emergency plan

  • Setting Preparedness Goals

    |9 COMMENT(S)

     Setting Preparedness Goals

    “Getting Prepared” is a worthy goal in and of itself, but can be a little bit nebulous. How do you know when you’re done? Do you have a way to be sure you covered all your bases?

    There’s one easy way to be sure you get everything done that you need to do without getting burned out: Set preparedness goals. Here are four good reasons you should:

    Track  your progress

    Setting preparedness goals is a great way to see how much progress you’re making in a given time period. If you set time-specific goals, even better. Keep your goals all in one place, and sort them by preparedness category. Assign a “due date,” and as you achieve them, check off the box, knowing you’ve got one more item, concept, or skill under your belt.

    Stay focused on the most important needs first

    It’s easy to get sidetracked in your preparedness efforts—everything can seem like “the most important” based on what’s going on in the world, the things you’ve already started working on, and things your neighbors, friends, or others tell you to do. Making goals will help you focus on what will meet your needs. Let your neighbors focus on their own needs, and everyone comes out ahead.

    Pace Yourself

    Working on one or two goals at a time keeps you from running around like a crazy person, doing a little bit of this and a little bit of that, while somehow still feeling like you didn’t make any progress at the end of the day (week, month, etc.).

    Consistently working on the same single goal (or two) will allow you to keep up your momentum without getting burned out and throwing in the towel.

    Enjoy the Accomplishment

    This is a biggie one—especially if you’re the type that likes to check things off your list. Setting manageable goals and checking them off your list can give you that boost of motivation to keep building on the supplies and the skills you already have.

    Get the Most Out of Your Goals

    There are a few things you can go to set yourself up for success in achieving your preparedness goals:

    1)      Figure out your preparedness needs and priorities first. This will keep your goals focused and relevant to what you want to accomplish.

    2)      Write them down. This is crucial. Have a preparedness binder? Stick this in the very front, and categorize your goals so you can easily see how your efforts are preparing you to meet your needs and face certain challenges.

    No preparedness binder? Keep your goals posted in your storage room near your supplies, or keep a document on your computer, tablet, or phone.

    3)      Make yourself accountable for your goals by sharing them with family or friends who are also interested in preparedness, survival, or homesteading (or all of the above). Friends and neighbors can provide additional ideas, help, and motivation.

    4)      Set timelines for each goal—and be realistic. If your budget won’t allow you to buy a year supply of food at once, don’t set a short-term goal to get a year’s worth of food. Make that a long-term goal, and work on a week supply or a month supply first. If, however, you’re too generous with the timeline, you may lose motivation to keep working toward your goal. So strike a balance, and don’t be a perfectionist about it.

    5)      Make the goals specific enough that you’ll know when you’ve accomplished them. If you find yourself checking off a goal and saying, “Well, except for…,” then it might be best to create two or more related goals.

    Remember to Have Fun!

    Enjoy the process of getting prepared—if you’re feeling burned out, alternate “have to” goals with “want to” goals to keep your interest and your motivation high. It might be boring to chop logs into firewood, but if you follow that with an evening of cooking delicious meals over a campfire or a backyard fire pit, you’ll remember the benefits of all your hard work—and practice a useful survival skill at the same time.

     

    So, what’s next on your list of survival goals?

     

    --Urban Girl.

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: emergency preparedness, Emergency plan, preparedness

  • 1960 Fallout Shelter Found Fully Stocked

    |6 COMMENT(S)

    After 10 years of living in their home, the Zwick family cracked open the fallout shelter out back and found it fully stocked!

    After living in their home for 10 years, a Wisconsin family was surprised to find an 8' x 10' fallout shelter in their backyard—even more surprising is that it was fully stocked! Ken and Carol Zwick cracked open the shelter for the first time in 2010, revealing $1,200 worth of emergency supplies stored by the home’s previous owners who were prepping for the Cold War.

    Inside the Shelter

    The Zwick family donated the supplies to the Neenah Historical Society (NHS) in the spring of 2012. According to the NHS website, the purpose of this society is to “collect, preserve, and share the stories of [their] community.”

    We reached out to NHS Executive Director, Jane Lang, to learn a little more. We were curious about the types of preparedness supplies the people who stocked this fallout shelter considered to be important to their survival 50 years ago.

    Although 5 feet of water seeped into the shelter during its 50 years of life, the Zwick family found many of the supplies still intact. Foodstuffs and treats like Tang, Corn Flakes, and Butterscotch Bits were found among other supplies such as toilet paper, paper towels, candles, clothing, bedding, tools, flashlights, and batteries (most of which were surprisingly still in good condition).

    But the previous owner didn’t stop there. Other supplies like a radio, an alarm clock, an axe, a funnel, and a phone book filled the water-tight, metal military boxes the Zwicks discovered. These World War II army surplus cases no doubt helped preserve the condition of the family’s emergency supplies.

    Emergency preparedness items from the 1960 fallout shelter as displayed at the Neenah Historical Society

    Items in your emergency supplies can range from the basics of food and water to items such as an alarm clock to help an emergency seem less like a crisis and more like daily life. One great item the previous owners added to their shelter was the phone book. Having a list of emergency phone numbers/emergency contacts is a great idea (as long as you keep it updated).

    According to Lang, one of the neatest items found in the shelter was a Geiger counter in perfect condition (still inside its box with the manual) and a “Banshee” radiation detector with its receipt. “It was fascinating to look at the contents of the shelter and see what people in 1960 were told to put into their family fallout shelters,” Lang stated.

    The Exhibit

    The NHS exhibit, “Take Cover, Neenah: Backyard Family Fallout Shelters in Cold War America” replicated the shelter found in the Zwick’s backyard. “I wanted visitors to be able to feel like they were back in the ‘60s, sitting in their own living rooms, and then leaving to take cover in their backyard shelter…so that people could get a true sense of that confinement,” Lang said.

    Lang went on to explain that in the late ‘50s and ‘60s, emergency preparation was greatly encouraged. As many visitors have toured the replicated fallout shelter and its supplies (1,500 in May and early June 2013 alone), they've wondered aloud whether we are “more or less safe [today] than we were during the Cold War.”

    Although in certain areas many people aren't as concerned about war as natural disasters, unemployment, or other emergencies, emergency preparedness is still essential. After all, Lang put it perfectly: “Human beings have always been and will always be concerned with family safety and security.”

    Currently the exhibit is closed for the winter, but will re-open in late April. The exhibit will close for good in late July this year. If you are in the area, stop by to check it out.

    If You Go:

    Cost:                            Free

    Location:                  343 Smith Street, Neenah, WI 54956

    For more information about the exhibit and when you can visit, feel free to call the Neenah Historical Society at 920-729-0244

    Update:

    A few of you have requested more photos of the fallout shelter found in Wisconsin so we found some for you! Below are photographs we found on the Internet of the Zwick family uncovering the shelter.

    Carol Zwick uncovers a 1960s fallout shelter in her backyard

    Courtesy of Daily News

    The fallout shelter behind the Zwick family's home

    Courtesy of Daily News

    Descending into the fallout shelter found in 2010

    Courtesy of Huffington Post

    Inside the 1960s fallout shelter found in a Wisconsin backyard

    Courtesy of the Daily News

    Stored water found in a 50 year old fallout shelter

    Courtesy of Daily News

    Foodstuff supplies stocked in a fallout shelter 50 years ago.

    Courtesy of Huffington Post

    --Kim

    Sources:

    Interview with Ms. Jane Lang, Exec. Director of the Neenah Historical Society

    http://www.focol.org/neenahhistorical/index.html

    www.nydailynews.com/news/national/wisconsin-family-found-1960-nuclear-shelter-article-1.1333040

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/02/neenah-wisconsin-fallout-shelter-photos_n_3200757.html

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: Cold War, 1960, fallout shelter, emergency preparedness, Survival, Emergency plan, preparedness

  • From the Archives: How to Prepare for a Flood

    How to Prepare for a Flood

    Of all the natural disasters we've talked about during National Severe Weather Preparedness Week, floods are probably the most common. If you think about it, floods can be manmade disasters  (like a washing machine overflowing or a pipe bursting) or natural disasters (like overflowing river basins and heavy rainfall). Floods can even be caused by runoff from ice and snow in an area.

    Recently, snow totals in the eastern and southern United States have dramatically increased. And as snowfall increases, so do snowpack levels for the area. In fact, it's anticipated that in the great lakes region a large snowpack will melt this spring. The runoff from this snow pack will be so large that it could cause flooding in some areas of the region. Since snow totals have been so high in some areas of the country this winter, flooding from snowpacks may be a real possibility, giving us more reason to prepare. Keep an eye out for flooding prospects in your region by checking out NOAA's Spring Flood Outlook page.

    The water damage floods create calls for extensive clean up like we saw during the 2013 Colorado flood. And like all natural disasters, the recovery and reconstruction of an area is largely accomplished through community involvement.

    Here are several sources and personal accounts from flood survivors that can help you learn how to prepare for a flood and how to cope with its aftermath.

    Educational Resources

    What to do before, during, and after a flood

    5 Tips for Walking Around Safely After a Flood

    Personal Accounts

    Why I Prepare: Lessons from the Colorado Flood (four-part series)

    Preparing for a Once in a Lifetime Flood

    Check out  our blog and Insight Articles to learn more about preparing for the variety of disasters that can happen in your area.

    Sources

    "Snow Ice Cover Will Boost Great Lakes Levels" --http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_GREAT_LAKES_WATER_LEVELS?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2014-03-05-23-07-43

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: natural diasters, emergency preparedness, Emergency plan

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