Tag Archives: emergency kit

  • Holiday Gift Guide: $50 and Under

    The holidays are just around the corner, but there’s still time to get a jump on your holiday shopping this year.

    Over the past two weeks we’ve given you gift ideas that’ll help your loved ones get prepared. You’ve seen options for gifts $10 and under and for gifts between $10 to $25. Here are some ideas for gifts between $25 and $50.

    My family is crazy into outdoor adventures—rock climbing, backpacking, skiing/snowboarding, canyoneering—all of it. We’re always looking for new gear that’ll make our trips more comfortable. Whether your loved ones are diehard adrenaline junkies or just love the outdoors, these gifts will bring a smile to their faces.

      1. Suisse Sport K-2 5° Sleeping Bag-- $49.99

         

        This sleeping bag is perfect for three-season camping (fall, winter, and spring). The Suisse Sport bag features a durable outer shell, with an inner double layer quilting and insulation to provide maximum warmth. It also has a full chest battle and draft tube to keep your body heat from escaping.  So if you enjoy winter camping, or hate being cold even in the crisp temperatures of spring and fall, this bag will keep you toasty warm.
      2.  

        Holiday Gift Guide: Suisse Sport K-2 5° Sleeping Bag

         

      3. Castlepine™ Internal Frame Backpack (green)--$34.95

         

        When you have to carry all your gear on your back (I’m thinking 50 milers, campouts, or other backpacking trips), it’s important to have a pack that’s strong enough to hold the weight you need, and durable enough to last as long as you do (and likely longer). This pack is great for backpacking trips or larger-scale emergency kits with its 3,200-cubic-inch capacity. Available in red and navy.
      4.  

         Holiday Gift Guide: Castlepine™ Internal Frame Backpack (green)

      5. Gerber Gator Combo Axe II with Saw--$50.00

         

        This combo is great because in one compact item, you get an axe and a saw. The Gerber Gator Axe II is longer than the original, giving you a stronger striking force. The handle is covered with the Gerber Gator texturing to give you a better grip, even in wet conditions. This is a gift that can be used in an emergency or in your regular outdoor adventures.
      6.  

         Holiday Gift Guide: Gerber Gator Combo Axe II with Saw

      7. Katadyn MyBottle MicroFilter--$49.95

         

        Having clean water is essential no matter where you are. The Katadyn MicroFilter is a great filter for on-the-go expeditions because you can filter water as you drink it. The microfilter removes bacteria and pathogenic cysts (such as Giardia and Cryptosporidim).  This MicroFilter gives you clean, fresh-tasting water.
      8.  

         Holiday Gift Guide: Katadyn MyBottle MicroFilter

      9. Twin Peaks Mountain Trails Tent--$49.99

         

        This is another great gift to give outdoor enthusiasts. Tents can be complicated, intricate, and just plain user-UN-friendly. But this lightweight, easy-to-set-up tent provides a quick shelter for 3-4 people. On backpacking trips, a quick set-up is ideal for when it starts to downpour before you’ve had a chance to set up camp—or if you just want to get through setup and focus on the fun stuff.
      10.  

         Holiday Gift Guide: Twin Peaks Mountain Trails Tent

      11. Goal Zero Rockout Speakers --$39.99

         

        When we go climbing, my brother always brings along his phone and speakers to pump us up. These Rockout Speakers would be the ideal gift for him. They provide a great experience during outdoor adventures, playing your music while keeping your device nestled safely inside. These portable and lightweight speakers have an internal battery that prevents it from draining your device’s battery, so you don’t have to worry about your phone or other device dying so quickly.
      12.  

         Holiday Gift Guide: Goal Zero Rockout Speakers

      13. Optimus Crux Lite Canister Stove--$39.95

         

        This lightweight stove is ideal for when you’re on the move. Being able to eat well when outdoors is great; being able to eat well in an emergency is luxury. This high-quality stove is built to last whether your loved ones need it now for adventures, or to store for future emergencies. Within 3 minutes, this portable stove can boil 1 liter of water—that’s pretty quick!
      14.  

         Holiday Gift Guide: Optimus Crux Lite Canister Stove

      15. MyChoice™ Hot Cocoa Combo (4 cans)--$25.95

         

        My family loves to drink hot chocolate with our dinner when we’ve just gotten off the snowy slopes and need to warm up. This combo gives you four delicious flavors (French Vanilla, Mint Truffle, Milk Chocolate, and Raspberry) for one price. This gift is a great option for all of your loved ones—whether or not they’re outdoor enthusiasts. Hot chocolate just makes the evening complete when you cuddle up to watch a movie or read a book with the snow falling outside your window.
      16.  

         Holiday Gift Guide: MyChoice™ Hot Cocoa Combo (4 cans)

      17. Goal Zero® Switch 8 Recharger--$49.99

         

        This power pack is fantastic outdoors or in emergency uses. The Switch 8 can power smart phones, flashlights, GPS, tablets, laptops, or anything else that powers with a USB. It can be charged with a USB plug or a solar panel, and is no bigger than a fat marker. It’s simple to use for when you are canyoneering, skiing, or need to charge your device on the go.
      18.  Holiday Gift Guide: Goal Zero® Switch 8 Recharger

      19. The Reliance Fold-n-Filter--$47.50 

         

        The Fold-n-Filter is water storage with built in water treatment. You can filter up to 200 gallons of water by simply squeezing the container to dispense the water you need to use. It even rolls up for storage and weighs in at just one pound. The filter is great to hang from a tree when camping, or to have on hand during an emergency. This is a great way to store clean, filtered water for you and your loved ones

      Holiday Gift Guide: The Reliance Fold-N-Filter

      So there you go—a few gift ideas costing between $25 and $50. Preparedness items (and the principle itself) are the gifts that just keep on giving.

      If these ideas don’t seem to be quite what you are looking for, check out beprepared.com for all of our products or our Pinterest gift boards for other great ideas.

      Happy shopping!

      -Kimberly

       

       

       

       

       

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: food storage, gifts, preparedness, emergency kit, emergency preparedness, holiday

  • How to Winterize your Car

    Winterize your car before the storms hit

    Winter is coming: the sparkling snowfalls, the unexpected storms, the chilly nights. Are you ready? Amidst the rest of your holiday planning, don’t forget to prep your car. Vans, trucks, cars, and SUVs all handle the winter weather differently, but there are five universal parts of your vehicle that you should winterize before the weather turns:

    Brakes

    Before a storm comes your way, get a standard inspection of your brake pads and brake fluid to make sure they’re working properly. Remember to give yourself extra room to brake during bad weather. If you don’t have anti-lock brakes, then it’s better to pump your brakes when trying to stop to avoid spinning.

    Tires

    Cold weather means less air pressure in your tires. Make sure to refill your tires as the pressure decreases to enhance their performance and your gas mileage. Also, it’s a good idea to fill your spare tire, just in case you need it during a particularly crazy storm. According to TireRack.com, “Proper tire inflation pressure . . . stabilizes the tire's structure, blending the tire's responsiveness, traction and handling.” Underinflated tires can lead to loss of steering accuracy and stability, and even tire failure.  For those of you who are living in a new area, check with the locals to see if you should be carrying snow chains with you (I’m lookin' at you, North Dakota).

    Well-worn tires can also pose a threat in the wintertime. Your tire’s traction is all that stands between you and an accident. If the tread depth of your tires is worn away, make sure to either buy new tires, snow tires, or get your “balded” tires siped.

    Engine

    You can easily have your engine and anti-freeze checked at any car stop. Just make sure you don’t replace your anti-freeze with water! As temperatures decrease, the water will freeze, expand, and crack your engine.

    Windshield Wipers

    As relentless winter storms blow around you (especially if you live in areas that get snow), your wipers are what stand between you and seeing the road. Make sure your wiper blades are relatively new and that the wiper fluid is filled. Don’t use water, though. If the temperatures get too low, the water will freeze on your windshield and then you have a whole new set of problems.

    Headlights & Brake Lights

    Lastly, get your headlights and brake lights checked. If you can’t see, and more importantly if others can’t see you, then you’re just asking for trouble. Get your headlights aimed properly—keeping your low lights aimed low to reduce glare from storms (if you live in an area that gets snow).

     

    Finally, just in case something does happen this winter, don't forget your Emergency Car Kit, or your Auto Tool Kit and toolbox.

    It goes without saying that the best way to winterize your car is to keep up on your regular maintenance checks (but we are going to say it anyway). These checks will keep your vehicle in prime condition no matter what time of year it is. Now that you’re all set to brave the winter weather on the road, good luck with your other winter prepping!

    -Kimberly

     

     

    Sources:

    http://autorepair.about.com/od/regularmaintenance/a/winterchecklist.htm

    http://www.uvureview.com/2012/11/12/how-to-winterize-your-car/

    http://www.environmentalgraffiti.com/travel/news-10-easy-steps-winter-reay-car-and-you

    http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=1

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: skills, Winter, prepared, preparedness, emergency kit, Survival

  • Make your own emergency kit

    Emergency kits come in all shapes and sizes, filled with all types of food, water supplies, shelters, and tools. But what is the right type of emergency kit for you? Building your own emergency kit is as simple as one, two, and three. For $10 or less apiece, you can arm yourself with the right products to help you meet your most basic needs in an emergency.

    1. Food & Water

    • Survival food packages like the Mainstay 3600 calorie bars work well because they are lightweight, compact, and delicious—they taste like cookie dough. Unlike traditional energy bars, these are formulated to withstand extreme temperatures and still last for 5 years. Keep them in your car, boat, RV, or inside your emergency kit at home. For only $7.50, these bars give one person enough calories for 3 days, or three people for a single day. 


    • Purified water in compact sizes can also be a good fit for adding to a backpack. Bottled water is a popular option, bottled water packages are prone to leaking and require frequent rotation. The 8 oz. Aqua Blox comes in sturdy packaging that is designed to keep your water safe for 5 years with the convenience of a juice-box-style package and straw. The water also comes purified, not just filtered, so it is contaminant free. Six of these blox would be sufficient drinking water for one person over 3 days for about $5. 


    • Filter Straws can treat natural water sources that you come across to allow you to find and treat water rather than carrying it. Simply suck water through the filter straw to remove common germs. If the source is frequented by humans or livestock, however, this filter would likely not provide the required protection. Cost is about $10.

    2. Shelter

    • Emergency ponchos pack up tight and are lightweight, yet provide substantial coverage to keep more of your body dry. Staying dry dramatically increases our comfort, making the emergency poncho an affordable and practical (about $1) addition to any kit. 


    • Portable Tents are another way to provide shelter—or even just to mark an area as your own. Unlike traditional tents, a tube tent is inexpensive, lightweight, and packs incredibly small to fit inside of your kit without forcing you to leave other items out. It is so light because of its simplicity – no poles, no stakes, just a tent wall. The tube tent is an 8 ft. long tube that shelters two people for about $4.

    3. Warmth

    There are two simple ways to stay warm in cold weather: 1) keep more of your own body heat, and 2) generate heat around you (campfires or heaters).

    •  Many of us use blankets and sleeping bags to retain more of our body heat.  Emergency sleeping bags are made of a high-efficiency reflective material that retains up to 90% of your body heat. They can be stored in very small spaces and only cost about $4. I’ve experienced a night in one of these bags and was very grateful I had it. 


    •  Having portable heat sources can keep your body from shutting down from loss of warmth. Disposable body warmers (larger versions of commonly-known hand warmers) provide heat for up to 20 hours and take up very little space. Their small size (and price – about $1 each) allows you to add several to your supplies. 


    •  Even if you aren’t a boy scout, you can start a fire with Emergency Essential’s various offerings of matches and strikers. One of my favorite options is Stormproof matches. Unlike conventional matches, these stay lit much longer to help you start a fire. Even if the matches get wet or the weather is windy, Stormproof matches will get the job done. You can buy a box by itself (about $4), or with a weather proof case for about $6. Check out the video on the link to see how amazing they are.

    See? Easy as 1-2-3. We have even set out to help you get started with the Basics Emergency Kit. This pre-made set includes many of these basic items and costs just about $20. This kit includes food, water, a poncho, 3 body/hand warmers, an emergency sleeping bag, a whistle, a lightstick, and an 18-piece first aid kit.

    With these basics, your emergency kit is off to a great start and can help protect you in a crisis. As your kit continues to grow, you can add more durable items to your supply, expanding it to prepare you for whatever the future may hold.

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: warmth, shelter, preparedness, emergency kit, water, Survival, emergency preparedness, food, Emergency Essentials, survival gear

  • With the change of seasons, it’s time to update your Grab & Go Bag—or 72-hour Kit, Bug-out Bag, Emergency Kit, Evac Kit, or whatever you prefer to call it! Update both your personal kit and one for your car.

    BABY STEP 1:  Update Your Personal Grab and Go Bag

    Items for a Winter Grab and go bag

    Think about what items you’d be glad to have if you had to leave your home in the spur of the moment with chilly weather waiting to greet you outside. You’ll definitely want things to help you stay warm and dry, right? Depending on your climate, consider adding a few items to each person’s grab and go bag.

     Reminder: have your kids grown enough to need larger disposable diapers or pull-ups? If so, you’ll want to remember those and store them in your grab and go bag.

     

    BABY STEP 2:  Update Your Emergency Car Kit

    Winter Car Emergency Kit

    Reminder: are your tires and windshield wipers in good condition? If not, consider getting them changed out before winter weather hits.

    Like it or not, Old Man Winter is on his way, and knowing that your grab and go bags are ready to go and you’re as prepared as possible will help you sleep when the wind blows—or when the snow falls.

     

    Sources:

    www.beprepared.com

    www.ready.gov/winter-weather

    www.quakekare.com/emergency-preparedness/winterstorm-preparedness.html

    weather.about.com/od/winterweather/ht/autosafetykits.htm

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: Car Kit, baby steps, emergency kit

  • House in 2013 Colorado Flood

    In light of the recent flooding in Colorado and all the damage that has occurred as a result, we want to share a series of posts from one Colorado woman’s perspective. Opinions expressed are hers and do not necessarily reflect those of Emergency Essentials. If you lived through the recent Colorado floods and want to share your story, please email social@beprepared.com.

     

    The damage caused by the Colorado floods will last for many, many years.  The damage you see on TV is nothing like seeing it in person.  So many people lost everything.  Communities are gone.  Where there were once fields of corn there are now just large lakes, even a week later.  Homes are still under water; roads and bridges are just gone; and businesses are destroyed.

    The weekend of September 20th, I went to see if there was anything I could do to help.  The images that most affected me were of two farm houses and their barns still under water.  Their fields had turned into lakes.  They lost everything.

    Landfills were full of so many destroyed memories.  I saw Flood Assistance signs directing people to tents that would give them clothing, food, and assistance to help with additional relief.  It was so sad to see. But it was also exciting to see as I witnessed so many people wanting to help.  I saw entire communities working together to help each other.  People helping people they didn’t even know, and wanting nothing in return.

    As I watched these people working together to clean up the devastating effects of this storm, I was trying to think about how someone could ever prepare for an emergency of this magnitude. The flood victims needed food, warmth, and a roof over their heads. I started to think that if my family and I had been affected as badly by the storm that all the goodies we have in our bug out bags wouldn’t be enough.

    I decided to help out at the tents giving clothing and food. I listened to stories from people that had it so much worse than me. They all talked about how thankful they were.  They said, “It could have been so much worse.”

    Many organizations teach us to be prepared for emergencies, but this was big.  You need to get everyone in your community involved, not just a few people.  Everyone should know how to prepare for emergencies. It’s that old saying “It takes a village.” After the floods, I contacted my neighbors to schedule a meeting to start teaching them all how to prepare for future emergencies. We have to start somewhere.

    Note from the editor: We offer free emergency planning resources for families and neighborhoods on our Downloads page. We encourage you to create a plan as soon as possible—even a very basic plan will help—and provide you a foundation to build on. 

    Check out the rest of the series:

    Why I Prepare: Lessons from the Colorado Floods, Part 1

    Why I Prepare: Lessons from the Colorado Floods, Part 2

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: preparedness, emergency kit, emergency preparedness, flood, natural disaster, Colorado flood

  • September Sale Items

    |2 COMMENT(S)

    Our September sale items will bring you remarkable savings this month. After looking through the September catalog for great deals, I found 8 sale items that would help you cover the essentials for emergency preparedness—light, food storage, shelter, water, and emergency and first aid kits.

    Light

    Charger Hand Crank Flashlight-on sale for $5.89 (50% off this month!). This flashlight has 3 LEDs and 2 brightness modes. One minute of hand cranking charges the internal NiMH battery for up to 30 minutes of light. Can charge basic cell phones (excludes most smart phones). The perfect addition to your emergency kit.

    CL-L330 EEI Red Charger Light copy

    Food Storage

    Supreme Pizza Combo-on sale for $99.99 (31% off this month!). This combo includes all the ingredients you need to make a supreme pizza—sausage, onions, peppers, mozzarella, dough mix, and sauce. This versatile combo comes in four Provident Pantry®#10 cans and four MyChoice™ cans. You can use the ingredients in other recipes as well.

    SPECIAL SALE- All Mountain House #10 cans—on sale for 40-50% off this month!

    For the whole month of September, we are having our best sale EVER on our Mountain House #10 cans. If you love Mountain House products, now is the time to stock up and get incredible savings on your favorite items like chili mac, raspberry crumble, and granola with blueberries and milk. Check out all the great Mountain House Deals for September.

    Mountain House Chili Macaroni at the dinner table

     

    Shelter

    Deluxe Portable Privacy Shelter-NEW item! On sale for $69.99 (22% off this month!) This portable pop-up shelter is perfect for camping, pool parties, and outdoor events. It’s the perfect size for one person to sit or stand comfortably while changing, showering, or for sanitation needs. Provides cool features like a detachable tarp floor, towel hanger, and toiletry pockets for the ultimate privacy and convenience.

    CH-S110 Portable Privacy Shelter copy

    Water

    SteriPen Emergency Handheld Water Purifier-On sale for $36.99 (26% off this month!). Use UV light to destroy waterborne microbes that could make you sick. Eliminates 99.9% of bacteria, viruses, and protozoa in water. Treats one liter in 90 seconds, and ½ liter in 48 seconds. Perfect for backpacking and hiking to purify water found on or off the trail.

    WP-P525

    Emergency Kit

    Roadwise Emergency Kit-on sale for $32.99 (originally $38.95). This car emergency kit can serve as a second emergency kit if you evacuate your home during an emergency. Kit includes hand warmers, poncho, water boxes, toilet paper, a multi-tool, headlamp, and 400 calorie bars, and much more! It’s the essential “bug-out-bag.”

    KC-A600 Roadwise Kit

    First Aid Kit

    Medic’s (192 piece) First Aid Kit-on sale for $69.99. (originally $79.95). Includes 175 medical items traditionally used by paramedics and emergency medical technicians. Comes with EMT shears, fine point tweezers, and a Wilderness and Travel Medicine Guide. The perfect item for a comprehensive emergency kit.

    KF-M100

     

    We’ve got some incredible deals this month, so don’t miss out! Remember to check out our Mountain House #10 can sales—with 40-50% savings, items are bound to go fast. Happy Prepping!

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: monthly sales, emergency kit, sale, water storage, #10 cans, September sale

  • iStock_000016393748XSmall_family camping

    When you think of your prepping supplies, what are the most important items for your survival? To me, food, water, and a fully stocked emergency kit are pretty high up on the list. However, a printed map displaying alternate routes to avoid traffic and congested areas could be as equally important to your survival as a #10 can of food!

    This week we came across a great article from Commonsense Homesteading that gives advice on how you can use a map in your prepping gear to keep you out of harm’s way during an emergency. This article gives tips for how to use your map effectively if you live in the country, city, or the suburbs.

    Here are some helpful tips for using a map in an emergency:

    #1. Print out a map of your area, laminate it, and put it with your prepping supplies (you might not be able to rely on Google Earth, Mapquest, and GPS on your phone or in your car during an emergency).

    #2. “Know your exit routes, map them.  Have multiple exit routes, don’t plan on just one.” Depending on the emergency, some common routes may be unusable or totally congested. You’ll want to know what your alternatives are.

    #3. Get to know your neighbors. If you live in the country, map out where their homes are within a five mile radius on your map, how long it will take you to get there, and what resources you could potentially share, trade, or sell to them in the event of an emergency. If you live in the city, get to know your closest neighbors and get their contact info. Have the contact info for local authorities.

    *As our recent "Hurricane Sandy: Neighbors to the Rescue" post suggests, those who get to know their neighbors and work together with their communities are more likely to get through an emergency situation than those who do not.

    #4. Know the Terrain and high-risk areas including rivers and other waterways or flood zones, bridges (which could be vulnerable to collapse), or highways prone to fog or ice.

    #5. Map out routes to your family or friends for shelter. Also map routes to storage units or other places you might have supplies waiting.

     

    For more information, tips, and tricks for getting the most out of printed maps during an emergency, check out the article at commonsensehome.com 

    For more information on evacuating during an emergency, learn how to build a car emergency kit and practice your family evacuation plan

    --Angela

     

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: skills, emergency kit, Emergency plan, Survival, emergency preparedness

  • At the end of 2012, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) estimated that 22.3 million people were living with type 1 or type 2 Diabetes in the United States. In fact, Dr. John Anderson of the ADA states, “I know of no other disease that is increasing at (about) 8% per year.” The growing rate of Diabetes among Americans is an important issue for emergency preparedness gurus to consider when addressing preparedness needs.

    iStock_000014511053XSmall_diabetes_testing blood sugar

    So, what can we do to adequately prepare for our families’ various health needs in an emergency?

     The American College of Endocrinology (ACE) and Lilly Diabetes outlined the importance of emergency planning for people with Diabetes and other health needs at ACE’s annual meeting (on May 1st). These two programs began collaborating after Hurricane Katrina and led to the creation of the EmPower “My Diabetes Emergency Plan.”

    The Emergency Plan

    My Diabetes Emergency Plan” is a comprehensive checklist (available in both English and Spanish) that helps those with diabetes prepare in advance for big and small emergency situations. In addition to blood glucose testing supplies, insulin, and medical records, some other suggested items to include in your emergency kit are:

    • Empty plastic bottles for syringes
    •  A 2-day supply of non-perishable foods (peanut butter, cheese crackers, meal replacement bars and shakes)
    •  Soda, honey, and hard candies for possible hypoglycemic reactions.
    • Cooler or insulated fanny pack to store insulin

    The purpose of this emergency plan is to prepare users for a range of emergency situations from severe weather to car trouble to power outages. So, you should constantly update the supplies in your emergency kit. Updating medical supplies is especially important for those with Type 1 diabetes that must take insulin regularly.  However, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) suggests that since insulin is a prescribed medication that you cannot store extra supplies of insulin unless your prescription and doctor allows it. But there are general guidelines and precautions that you can take.

    Guidelines and Precautions for Insulin Users

    According to the FDA, insulin can be stored in a refrigerated area  at approximately 36 to 46 degrees F until the expiration date on the package. If there is no access to refrigeration, “all of the available insulin can be left unrefrigerated (between 59 and 86 degrees F) for up to 28 days and still maintain potency.” The ADA also suggests that if your glucose levels go too low that you do not want to inject insulin, but you can stock up on glucose pills and candies to help raise these levels. For more information on how to use insulin during an emergency situation, check out the websites listed at the end of this post.

    Sometimes in emergency situations hospitals provide insulin to patients who have their prescriptions and medical records with them. The FDA suggests that it is ok to use a different brand of insulin if your doctor has discussed and prescribed alternatives to you. This is why it is important to include up to date medical records in your emergency kit and to talk to your physician about these alternatives as the Empower “My Diabetes Emergency Plan” suggests.

    Dr. Lawrence Blonde, endocrinologist, member of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and fellow of ACE, states, "Our goal is to encourage people with diabetes to take steps in advance of an emergency to protect their health. It only takes a few minutes to prepare an emergency kit, and now with the added download availability of our checklist in Spanish, even more people can be ready." In addition to this comprehensive plan and checklist, there is also a step-by-step video about how to build your emergency kit that you can watch on the Empower website.

    Learn more about this exciting press release and the ongoing conversation about Prepping for the various health needs of your family at the Eli Lilly and Company website

    Click here to see the “My Diabetes Emergency Plan” checklist

    Click here to see information on insulin use during an emergency situation:

    http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/EmergencyPreparedness/ucm085213.htm

     http://www.diabetes.org/assets/pdfs/ada-emergency-medical-advice.pdf

    Additional Sources:

    http://www.cnn.com/2013/03/06/health/diabetes-cost-report

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: preparedness, emergency kit, Emergency plan, family, emergency preparedness

  •  

    iStock_000008012212XSmall

     

    When I was fourteen-years-old, my great-uncle experienced a third degree oil burn while frying fish for our family dinner. My grandmother and I, who were the only ones home, had no idea what to do and my uncle refused to go to a hospital. Growing up in the depression era, my uncle was used to using home remedies to solve all of his ailments, but this burn needed greater medical attention than his home remedies could provide.

    As a fourteen-year-old, I was terrified at the sight of the burn and knew nothing about burn care. If only I had known about Emergency Essentials and products like the BURNFREE Pain Relieving Gel, my uncle may have been saved a portion of the medical expenses and treatments that he had to face because he did not know how to properly take care of his burn wounds.

    Imagine cooking a family meal in the kitchen, like my uncle was, and then having a burn emergency that requires urgent care. What would you do? How would you treat the burn effectively? If you have a BURNFREE Pain Relieving Gel stored in the kitchen, you can pop out the gel and use it to immediately avoid any infection to the area and begin to lessen the pain. *

    The BURNFREE Pain Relieving Gel was specifically developed for first-aid use on burns and scalds. By storing one of these bottles in your home, you can begin to care for burns properly before the burn creates any devastating effects to your body. And because not all burns are third-degree magnitude, this gel allows you to treat burns in a variety of situations.

    MF-B515 BurnFree 4 oz. Gel

    Help your family know exactly where to turn for aid in the event of a burn emergency by getting the BURNFREE Pain Relieving Gel. This gel is originally priced at $4.95 each, but with your group savings, you can purchase this preparedness essential for $3.00 a bottle. At least 24 bottles much be purchased to receive this discount. These incredible savings will potentially save you or your loved ones from the painful and lasting effects of a burn injury.

     

    *In the event of a third degree burn, seek immediate medical attention

    -Angela

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: group program, group specials, emergency kit, burn care

  • iStock_000008708575XSmall_Tree_FourSeasons

    As you jump into spring cleaning, remember to check your emergency kits. As the seasons change, the items in our emergency kits should change accordingly. Now that we’re heading into warmer weather, switch out that heavy coat for a lighter jacket or sweatshirt (depending on where you live). You probably don’t need those snow boots for a few months, so switch them out for a pair of tennis shoes, hiking boots, or galoshes. Gloves, hats, and scarves may still come in handy; use your discretion to decide what’ll be best for you and your family.

    While you’re at it, check the expiration dates on:

    Check batteries and electronic items like radios and cell phone chargers. Make sure they still work!

    Check to make sure nothing’s cracked and leaking (like that bottle of hand sanitizer).

    Add items you may have forgotten like sunblock, a hat, N95 respirator masks, or utensils.

    Keep in mind that disasters in your area change with the seasons; update your kit to reflect what you might need during tornado season if you live in tornado country, or flood season if you live in flood country, or fires if you live in fire country, etc.

    If you’re not sure what might happen in your area, click here to find out. If you’d like ideas on what to put into an emergency kit, read over one of our handy checklists here. We’re serious about helping you prepare, so if you have any questions, ask them in the comments below and we’ll answer!

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: baby steps, emergency kit

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