Tag Archives: Dessert

  • A Little Water Can Go a Long Way

    You'll want more than just a little water here. White Sands National Monument, New Mexico (The Telegraph)

    Dehydration kills, fast. A French couple died this month in hours in White Sands National Monument because they ran out of water. They and their son only took two half-liter water bottles on their hike in the 100-plus degree desert, instead of the four liters per person recommended. Their son survived because his parents gave him two sips for every one they took, according to news reports.

    It just goes to show that a little water can go a long way.

    On average, people need about three quarters of a gallon of fluid daily according to ready.gov. Some need more: children, nursing mothers, sick people, those who are exercising, and people in a warm climate. In very hot temperatures, water needs can double.

    If you keep your head, you can get water in many ways. Here are some of them, from easiest to hardest.

     

    Store water

    The easiest way to have water after an emergency is to store it before an emergency. The Red Cross recommends a gallon per person, per day, for at least three days.

    Commercially bottled water is the safest and most reliable water for storage. It’s easy to obtain, easy to store and lasts longer than home-bottled water. Just don’t open it and be aware of the expiration dates on the bottles.

    More than just a little water! More than just a little water!

    Home-bottled water can be less expensive and perhaps provide a way to recycle old soft drink bottles. We even have food-grade water storage containers, which makes storing water easy. If you want to re-use old bottles, the Red Cross says don’t use milk or fruit juice containers. Milk proteins and fruit sugars can’t be completely removed. Don’t use cardboard or glass containers.

    To bottle water at home, first clean bottles with dish soap and rinse completely. Sanitize soft drink bottles by swishing around a solution of 1 teaspoon of non-scented liquid chlorine bleach to 1 quart of water. After sanitizing the bottles, rinse them completely.

    Second, fill each bottle with tap water. If your water comes from a well or if your utility doesn’t treat it with chlorine, add two drops of non-scented liquid chlorine bleach to each gallon of water. Check the water after a half hour. If it doesn’t have a slight bleach smell, re-treat it and wait 15 minutes.

    Or, you can use water purification tablets, such as the Katadyn Micropur Purification Tablets. They work best when water is at least 68 degrees, so leave very cold water out to warm, according to WikiHow.

    Use the original cap on the container. Close it tightly, and write the date on the outside of the container. Store it in a cool, dry place. Replace home-bottled water every six months.

     

    Use hidden water sources in the home

    If a disaster takes place while you’re at home, you have some hidden safe water sources: melted ice cubes and water drained from pipes and the hot water heater, according to ready.gov.

    Do not drink water from toilet flush tanks or bowls, radiators, water beds or swimming pools.

    First, know how to turn off water mains. Broken water and sewage lines can contaminate water coming into your home.

    To drain pipes, turn on your faucet to the highest level to let air into pipes then get water from the lowest faucet in the home.

    To get water from the water heater, make sure the electricity or gas is off, and open the drain at the bottom of the tank. Turn off the water intake valve in the tank and turn on the hot water faucet. Once clean water is restored, refill the tank before turning the gas or electricity on.

     

    Purify water from impure sources

    A little water to purify and filter

    If you’re out of clean water, the Red Cross says you can treat water from precipitation, streams, or rivers, ponds, lakes, and underground springs. Don’t use untreated water. It can contain deadly germs. Don’t use flood water or water with floating material, an odor, or a dark color. Only use salt water if you distill it first. For those of you on the coast, this could be a good source of water if you have a desalinator.

    First, let suspended particles settle to the bottom of a container or strain water through coffee filters or layers of clean cloth. Then use whatever method you choose: boiling, purification tablets or bleach, filters, UV pens, distiller, or a combination of methods. For a wide range of purification tools, check out our water purification options.

    If you’re concerned about being short of water, follow these rules from survival expert Tom Brown, Jr. in Mother Earth News. Don’t drink carbonated beverages or alcohol. They cause dehydration. So do urine and salt water unless they’ve been distilled. Don’t eat if you don’t have water to drink with it. Limit activity to limit perspiration.

    However, drink what water you have. People have died of thirst with full canteens.

    “Try to store as much water as you can in your stomach,” Brown wrote.

    Because, as we’ve seen from the story about the French family, a little water can still go a long way.

     

    - Melissa

     

    What does your water preparedness look like? Let us know in the comments below!

    Posted In: Water Storage Tagged With: little water, thirst, emergency preparations, Dessert, water

  • Stacey's Double Apple Crisp

    At our house, Christmas celebrations revolve around traditional treats that different family members have been perfecting for decades. My mom’s pie crust is legendary. My dad’s truffles, fudge, toffee, and peanut brittle are requested annually. In recent years, we’ve added my husband’s mouth-watering peppermint-chocolate-chocolate-chip cookies and a friend’s grandmother’s recipe for old English boiled cranberry pudding We do manage a dinner in there somewhere, but if I’m honest, our holiday is basically a sweet fest.

    My job is baking. The breads, the cookies, the cobblers all fall to me, which suits me just fine (me, who couldn’t find my way around a candy thermometer if my life depended on it!). The only problem is that from mid-November onward, I end up having to make semi-weekly pilgrimages to the grocery store just to stay stocked up on eggs, butter, and brown sugar—not to mention the fresh fruit and cream that I only ever need in miniscule portions and which spoil after five minutes in my fridge. But this year, I found a secret weapon!

    Are you ready?

    I don’t think you’re ready.

    Okay, fine. It’s egg powder. Seriously, I have a pumpkin bread recipe that calls for six eggs. Do you know how fast I go through those huge cartons? But already this month I’ve made pumpkin bread, sugar cookies, and two batches of gingerbread, and I haven’t even made a dent in my can of egg powder. I love it! And it makes me think I should be raiding my food storage for other basics, and maybe even the not-so-basics.

    In that spirit, I want to share with you one of my favorite seasonal treats. I found this fantastic apple crisp recipe years ago and have been tinkering with it every winter until it’s become, quite simply, the best thing ever. And it can be made almost entirely out of food storage items! Good to know you could still have luxuries like apple crisp, even in the midst of a crisis. Bon appétit!

     A Dish Of Apple Crisp made from Food Storage

    Stacey’s Double Apple Crisp

    1 ½ cups Provident Pantry White Flour

    2 cups Provident Pantry Regular Rolled Oats

    2-3 tsp MyChoice Premium Cinnamon

    1 tsp ground nutmeg

    1 tsp ground cloves

    1 ½ cups packed Provident Pantry Brown Sugar 

    1 ½ cups (3 sticks, or 24 tbsp) reconstituted Provident Pantry Butter Powder

    6-8 cups reconstituted Provident Pantry Freeze-Dried Cinnamon Apple Slices

     

    1.      Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C)

    2.      Combine flour, oats, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, and brown sugar. Cut in butter until mixture is crumbly (this works best with fingers!)

    3.      Put half the mixture into a 9x13 baking dish and pat down.

    4.      Cover crumb mixture with reconstituted apple slices, then sprinkle apples with remaining crumb mixture.

    5.      Bake for 45-50 minutes. Serve hot. Top with ice cream.

    Um…I might need to go make this right now.

    --Stacey

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: christmas, Dessert, family, recipe, holidays, food storage

  • Dutch Oven Basics Part Five: Desserts

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    When you hear the words, “Dutch oven,” what’s the first thing that comes to mind? For me, it’s images of peach cobbler and pineapple upside-down cake (Dutch ovens are famous for making excellent desserts). Dutch ovens are versatile and durable, making them a great choice for cooking food while camping or in a survival situation when it may be the only oven you have!

    When making desserts, follow the instructions outlined in our article “Dutch oven Basics—Prepping and Cooking with your oven” to bake desserts in your oven without burning them. Remember to either create a foil ring to place on the bottom of the inside of your Dutch oven or you can also purchase Dutch oven baking racks to place under your oven to stop your desserts from being burned.

    If you cook your dessert directly on the bottom of the oven, be sure you don’t have too many charcoal briquettes beneath it—slower cooking times are better than scorched dessert!

    Here are some delicious Dutch oven desserts you can try (but don’t blame us if everyone starts begging for more):

    Apple Cake

    2 Eggs (4 Tbsp Provident Pantry Whole Egg Powder + 6 Tbsp water)

    2 C Provident Pantry White Sugar

    2 tsp Vanilla Extract or MyChoice™ Pure Vanilla Powder

    2 tsp Provident Pantry Iodized Salt

    1 ½ Tbsp. Provident Pantry Baking Soda

    ½ C Provident Pantry Shortening Powder

    2 C Provident Pantry White Flour

    1 Tbsp MyChoice™ Premium Korintji Cinnamon

    4 C Provident Pantry Freeze Dried Apple Dices

    ½ C Chopped Nuts (optional)

    Reconstitute apple dices and drain excess water. Cream together eggs, sugar, vanilla, salt, baking soda, and shortening powder. Add water, flour, and cinnamon; Mix well. Stir in apples and nuts. Pour into greased, floured cake pan (that can fit in your Dutch oven). Place cake pan in Dutch oven on top of foil coil or flattened foil ball. Use 17 briquettes on top and 8 on bottom to raise temperature of Dutch a 12 inch oven to 350 degrees. Bake at 350 for 50-60 minutes.

     

    Chocolate Upside Down Cake

    3 Tbsp Provident Pantry Butter Powder

    1 C Provident Pantry White Flour

    2 tsp. Provident Pantry Baking Powder

    ¼ tsp. Provident Pantry Iodized Salt

    5 tsp.  Provident Pantry Dutch Process Baking cocoa

    ½ C Provident Pantry Dry Milk

    1 C chopped pecans or walnuts (optional)

    1 C water

    ½ C Provident Pantry white sugar

    ½ C Provident Pantry Brown Sugar

    ¼ cup Provident Pantry Dutch Process Baking cocoa

    Melt 3 Tbsp butter in dutch oven and swirl around to cover sides. In zip-loc, mix the flour, sugar, baking powder, salt, and cocoa. (Could do this beforehand) In a bowl, combine flour mix with milk and vanilla. Pour in melted butter from dutch oven. (Just take what pours out, leaving the oven well-coated.) Add nuts and stir well. Pour batter into dutch oven. Mix sugar, brown sugar, and cocoa in a zip-loc. (Could prepare beforehand) Sprinkle sugar over top of batter. Pour 1 cup of water over batter.

    Use 17 briquettes on top and 8 briquettes on bottom of a 12 inch oven (using this many briquettes on top and bottom will heat your oven to 350 degrees). Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes with more heat on top than under. Check for doneness by inserting toothpick or similar into center of cake - if it comes out clean, it is done.

    When done, remove from heat and remove lid for about 5-10 minutes to cool. Then, put lid on and turn cake over onto lid. If all goes well, it will fall onto lid, but you may loosen the cake with a knife before flipping. Serves 6.

     

    Cobbler

    From Don’t be Afraid of Your Food Storage . . . Just Dutch It!  By Archie and Linda Dixon

    10 inch or 12 inch Dutch oven, 24 briquettes: all on bottom to start, then 8 bottom, 16 top; Cook 30 to 60 min.; serves 10-12

    Good:

    3-5 cups Provident Pantry freeze-dried fruit, soaked 1 hour; drain

    1 cup Provident Pantry white sugar

    3 Tbsp Provident Pantry corn starch

    1 tsp. MyChoice™ Premium Korintiji cinnamon (optional)

    1 ½ cups water (use water used to soak fruit)

    1 cup Provident Pantry whole wheat flour

    ½-1 cup Provident Pantry white sugar (depending on how sweet you want it)

    1 ½ tsp. Provident Pantry baking powder

    ¼ tsp. Provident Pantry Iodized salt

    ¼ cup oil

    ¼ cup reconstituted Provident Pantry dry milk, ½ cup if making a cake-like batter

     

    Mix together sugar, corn starch and cinnamon in Dutch oven. Add water (use water fuit soaked in) and stir until sugar dissolves.

    Add drained fruit and cook and stir over colas until fruit is partly cooked and mixture is thick.

    Make Topping: Mix together flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Add oil and milk. Mix. Turn out on lightly floured surface and roll out to ½ inch thick or just press with hnads. Cut into 1 inch strips and lay these over fruit mixture. If you want moister dough just add more milk until desired consistency (make either drop biscuits or add more milk to make a thick cake-like batter you would pour over fruit). Bake 30 minutes, then check. Cobbler is done when topping is golden and fruit is bubbly.

    Better:

    Use canned fruit; drain first, saving 1 cup juice to mix with 2 Tbsp. cornstarch. Mix together sugar and cinnamon, then mix everything together in Dutch oven. Cover with topping. Use fresh fruit in place of dried. Replace whole wheat flour with white flour.

    Best:

    Replace powdered milk with evaporated milk for a richer batter. Replace oil with melted butter.

    Note: for easier clean-up, line oven with heavy duty foil. If you like nuts, sprinkle ½ cup chopped walnuts over fruit mixture and on top. Be careful it doesn’t burn on bottom.

     

    Dutch Oven Basics Part Five: Dessert (BePrepared.com)

     

    Dutch Oven Apple (or any dried fruit) Pie

    1 double 9-inch pie crust

    3 cups Provident Pantry freeze-dried apple slices or apple dices

    2-3 cups water for reconstituting (Soaking fruit for 30 minutes will save on baking time.)

    ¾ cup Provident Pantry White sugar

    2 Tbsp. Provident Pantry cornstarch, or ¼ cup Provident Pantry White flour

    1 tsp. MyChoice™ Premium Korintiji cinnamon (unless your apples were dried with cinnamon)

    Dash nutmeg

    1 tablespoon Provident Pantry butter powder, shortening powder or oil

    Dash Provident Pantry Iodized salt

     

    Drain the soaked fruit, reserving the liquid. Put fruit and 1 ¾ cups of the liquid into smaller Dutch oven (or other heavy pot) on a bed of coals. (If you’re using anything other than a Dutch oven, support your pot over the coals on bricks or rocks so that the bottom won’t burn.)  Mix spices with sugar and either cornstarch or flour, and add to fruit; Stir until dissolved and liquid is bubbling. Add butter, oil, or shortening and salt. Juices should have thickened somewhat, and will thicken more as pie bakes and cools. Pour hot fruit mixture into pie shell. Moisten edge of pastry; add top crust and fold edges under edges of bottom crust. Crimp together with fork or fingers. Cut several slits in top crust.  Sprinkle with a little sugar if desired. Place pie on rolled foil rack in clean 12-inch Dutch oven which has been preheated for five minutes, using 4 coals between each leg of oven and 2 rings of coals on lid. Check after 30 minutes to see if pie is getting too browned, and adjust coals as needed. Bake 10 to 20 more minutes. Pie is done when juices are bubbling in the slits.

    Tip:  experiment with dried fruits according to what you have. You might try apple, cherry and raisin, or apricot with dried pineapple, or peach with raspberries. What about cherry, blueberry and raspberry?

     

    This is the final installment of our Dutch Oven Basics Series. We hope that you’ve enjoyed learning about how to care for your Dutch oven and getting some new recipes to try out!

    Can’t get enough of our Dutch oven series? Click the links below to read the rest of the series

    Dutch Oven Basics Part One: Picking Your Oven

    Dutch Oven Basics Part Two: Prepping and Cooking with Your Oven

    Dutch Oven Basics Part Three: Breakfast Recipes

    Dutch Oven Basics Part Four: Sides and Main Dishes

     

     

     

     

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: emergency cooking, outdoor cooking, Dutch oven, Dessert, food storage

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