Tag Archives: cooking

  • 15 Food Storage Hacks to Make Cooking Easier

    You may think of food storage as buckets of wheat and beans that are useless in your everyday cooking.

    Not so, my friends. Here are 15 food storage hacks to make your cooking easier and more awesome on a daily basis:

    1. Dehydrated onion flakes = no chopping onions = no tears. Win.

    2. Freeze-dried fruit crushed into powder in a blender makes an awesome addition to frosting and filling for cakes, cookies, and other treats.

    3. Powdered milk is fantastic for baking and everyday use (especially when you unexpectedly run out and your kids are about to stage a mutiny).

    4. Powdered milk is also great for those who use milk infrequently. No sense in letting half of the container go bad—just mix up the amount you want on an as-needed basis. Also, powdered milk has come a long way since your childhood days of “scorched-tasting” milk. Don’t be afraid.

    5. Use the powder or leftover pieces of your favorite freeze-dried fruits or spices to create delicious compound butters to spread on bread and other treats.

    6. Instead of chopping up garlic, Minced Garlic is a super convenient product to store. It will cut your prep time in half, and you can use it in your favorite meals. (And, bonus, your hands won’t smell like garlic.)

    7. Freeze-dried veggies are an easy way to have seasonal vegetables at any time of year. Add them to soups and casseroles without having to chop, slice, or dice.

    8. Add Peanut Butter Powder to smoothies. You’ll get all the flavor with much less fat.

    9. Use Butter Powder to make spreadable butter in a hurry.

    10. If you get home late or forgot to plan dinner, you can use Taco Mix (TVP) to make tacos in a flash!

    11. Freeze-dried fruit is perfect in smoothies. You can also use Freeze-dried fruits to make apple-peach or strawberry-banana bread.

    12. Looking for a great after school snack for the kids? FD fruits are healthy and taste so good, the kids won’t miss candy (well . . . )

    13. Use Freeze-dried meats as toppings for homemade pizza.

    14. Got a “Helper” meal or pre-packaged meal that requires meat? You can use freeze-dried meats as substitutes in your favorite pre-packaged dishes.

    15. Wheat berries don’t just have to be used for flour. You can use wheat berries as a meat extender or a substitute for meat in meals. Check out our post, “All about Wheat” to find out how.

    How do you use food storage to make cooking easier?

    -Angela, Dawn, and Urban Girl

     

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: food storage, cooking, emergency cooking

  • Cheese Making 101: A Basic Guide

    Whether you’re a cheese connoisseur or just like to throw it in with your lasagna, homemade cheese will give you a delicious (not to mention inexpensive!) blend of flavors—exactly the way you want. And believe it or not, making your own homemade cheese is actually easier than you might think, it just takes some practice. Learn some of the basics of cheese making and how it can change the way you look at cheese.

     

    Why should I make my own cheese?

    By making your own cheese, you’re actually getting a lot more than just better taste. Check out five benefits to making your own cheese.

    1. No artificial ingredients. Commercially sold cheese tends to have added food coloring, growth hormones, pesticides, or GMO-heavy ingredients, according to Cultures for Health and FineCooking.com. When you make your own cheese, everything you put into it is completely natural, making it a healthier addition to your meals. And it never hurts to know exactly what you are putting into the food that you’ll be putting into your body.

    2. It’s inexpensive. Making your own cheese is a great way to try all the exotic varieties of cheese without breaking the bank. The only supplies you need are a heavy-bottomed pot, kitchen thermometer, cheesecloth, and some cultures (but we’ll get into that later).

     3. Fast and Easy. Once you learn how to make cheese, it’s a process that becomes fast and easy, no matter what type of cheese you decide to try. The basic process is the same for most cheeses, so no matter what you want to make, you’ll already have the basics down.

    4. Children love it. Most kids love cheese, and letting them be a part of making it is a great activity. It’s also a fun way to teach them about science and chemistry as you use bacteria, enzymes, and naturally formed acids to solidify and preserve milk protein, and fat.

    5. It’s delicious. Do I really need to say any more? No matter what flavor of cheese you choose to make, it’ll make a tasty addition to your meals and snacks.

     

    Basic Supplies

    Making cheese requires some basic supplies to help you get the best possible results. Make sure you have the following equipment and ingredients on hand before you start.

    Ingredients:

    Fresh Milk: The fresher the milk, the better. The best flavor of cheese comes from unpasteurized milk (although you’ll want to let it cure for 2-4 months if you’re worried about pathogens in it); however, you can also use pasteurized milk, whole milk, or skim milk. Using anything other than unpasteurized milk may require you to add extra ingredients (such as more Calcium Chloride in pasteurized milk to help it coagulate). Remember, the fresher and fattier the milk, the richer and better the taste. Note: Ultra-pasteurized milk is not recommended to make cheese because it has difficulty coagulating. It can, however, work for making yogurt.

    Cultures: Cultures are the bacteria or chemicals you add to acidify your milk and help the curing process. There are two types of cultures: Thermophilic and Mesophilic. The one you need will depend on the cheese you make. Thermophilic cultures are used for cheeses that are scalded to high temperatures. Mesophilic cultures are for those that don’t heat beyond 102° F.

    A lot of cultures are considered “mixed cultures” where there are multiple strains of bacteria included. The mix of the culture can change quickly due to temperature and storage conditions so it can be harder to know exactly what the mix of those cultures is. You can also use pure cultures (where there’s only one strain of bacteria present, making it easier to know exactly what bacteria is in the culture) from cheese-making supply houses.

    Rennet: Rennet is the enzyme that causes acidified milk to gel together and to form a “clean break”. A clean break is when the coagulated milk holds itself together when you probe the mixture with a table knife or finger. In order to get a clean break, the milk must be undisturbed during its gelling process. You can use rennet liquid, powder, or tablets.

     

    Equipment:

    Heavy Stainless Steel Pot with Lid: It’s important to use a pot with a heavy bottom to help disperse the heat evenly without scorching the milk. You can also use a heavy enameled pot. Just make sure you don’t use an aluminum one which will react with the acidifiers (bacteria or inorganic chemicals that produce or become acids to help with the curing) used in the process.

    Measuring Cups: Have a variety of measuring cups and spoons on hand. Accurate measurements will help your cheese turn out better.

    Thermometer: While cooking and cooling your cheese, it’s important to keep an accurate temperature reading. The texture of your cheese depends on it and can change with a sudden shift in temperature, even by one degree.

    Large Whisk: This helps to mix the rennet and starter. Rennet is the enzyme that causes acidified milk to gel together. The starter is the bacteria or acidifiers you add to your milk so that the rennet will work and the curds will form.

    “Cheese Cloth”: Use a type of “cheese cloth” or white cotton fabric (such as a handkerchief or a non-terry sterilized dish towel) to drain the liquid whey proteins from the solid curds. If possible, avoid using what is sold at supermarkets as “cheese cloth”. Typically, this fabric is too flimsy and the open-weave material will let your curd slip through. If you do choose to use the supermarket’s cheese cloth, layer a few pieces at different angles to minimize curd loss.  

    Cheese Press:  This tool is used to apply pressure to fresh curds, exposing the milk protein and allowing the loose curds to bond with each other to form solid cheese. The cheese press is required if you plan on making a hard cheese (Parmesan, Romano, Cojita, aged Gouda, etc.). You can purchase a press from a cheese-making supply house, or make your own if you’re only making a pound or two.

    Wax: Waxing the outside of your cheese prevents it from molding or spoiling while it ages. Make sure to use a wax that will resist cracking (unlike Paraffin) so that your cheese doesn’t spoil or grow mold through the wax’s weak spots. Check out how to wax your cheese here.

     

    Basic Process

    Before beginning, prepare your kitchen by scrubbing your counters, stove, and sink thoroughly. Each type of cheese requires the growth of specific bacteria in the mixture of basic ingredients. Any unwanted bacteria that get into the mixture can ruin your batch of cheese.

    The process for each type of cheese (soft, semi-soft, hard, extra-hard) is fairly similar, with slight variations to make each cheese different. For example, the process for making Cheddar cheese and Colby cheese starts out the same, but the Colby cheese has an extra step where more water is added, giving you a moister cheese in the end.

    Learn more about cultures from CheeseMaking.com.

    Learn more about Rennet from CheeseMaking.com.

    Learn more about cheese-making and get more recipes at the sites below:

     

    Sources:

    http://www.culturesforhealth.com/reasons-to-make-your-own-cheese

    http://www.finecooking.com/item/48505/top-5-benefits-of-home-cheese-making

    http://www.cheesemakingrecipe.com/

    http://biology.clc.uc.edu/fankhauser/Cheese/Cheese_course/Cheese_course.htm

    http://www.cheesemaking.com/store/pg/240-FAQ-Cheesemaking-and-Ripening.html

    http://science.howstuffworks.com/innovation/edible-innovations/food-preservation7.htm

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acidifier

    http://www.leeners.com/cheese/how-to/cheese-making-cheese-press.shtml

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: food storage, food, cooking

  • A Surprising Use for Freeze-Dried Fruit

    One of the unexpected ways I've learned to use freeze-dried fruit is in baked goods—and I don't mean adding freeze-dried fruit to muffins or quick breads, although those are delicious options, as well. In addition to the traditional ways of using freeze-dried fruits in baking, use them to flavor frosting, cream cheese filling, buttercream, or even your batter!

    Using fresh fruit in these items can prove... runny. You know what I mean—you want the delicious flavor of your favorite fruits, but when you get the strawberries (raspberries, etc.) into the frosting, the water in that fresh fruit ruins the consistency.

    Using freeze-dried fruits can give you all the delicious fruit flavor you're looking for without any of the watery aftermath. Just measure out the amount you think you'll need, crush them in a food processor or blender (do NOT rehydrate... remember, we're trying to avoid additional liquid), and stir them in! It's that simple.

    Trust me. You'll want to give it a try. You can thank me later (preferably in the form of freshly-baked cupcakes...).

    --Urban Girl

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: food storage, Urban Girl, Food Storage Tips, cooking, baking

  • Au Gratin Potatoes with herbs

     

    Cooking a hot, comforting meal in your Dutch oven will give you and your family a small sense of home during an emergency. You want to make sure that you have the essential ingredients to make foods that your family is familiar with. A meal of Beef Stroganoff with fluffy Dutch oven rolls can go a long way toward keeping your family calm and relaxed during an emergency.

    Check out these recipes for sides and main dishes you can make in your Dutch oven using your food storage.

    SIDES

    Dutch oven Dinner Rolls

    From Don’t be Afraid of Your Food Storage . . . Just Dutch It!

    10” or larger Dutch oven; 4 round or square cake pans; 24 briquettes: 8 bottom, 16 top (more if using a larger oven), Makes 32 rolls.

    Good:

    1 tablespoon SAF Instant Premium yeast

    ¼ C warm water

    ¾ C warm milk (reconstituted Provident Pantry Dry milk)

    ¼ C Provident Pantry sugar

    1 teaspoon Provident Pantry Iodized salt

    ¼ C oil

    1 egg (2 tbsp Provident Pantry whole egg powder+ 2 tbsp water) (optional)

    3 to 4 cups fine Provident Pantry whole wheat or white flour (or a mixture)

    Directions:

    Dissolve yeast in warm water. Stir in milk, sugar, salt, egg (if using it), oil or shortening and 2 cups of the flour. Beat until smooth, mix in remaining flour. Turn dough onto lightly floured surface; knead until smooth and elastic, 5-10 minutes. Grease medium size bowl, place dough in bowl then turn dough over so greased side is up. Cover with towel and let rise in warm (not hot) place until double in size, 1 ½-2 hours. Dough is ready if finger impression remains. Punch down dough and form into your favorite type of rolls. For our example you will make pan rolls.

    Grease pans that will fit into your Dutch oven. If baking directly in your Dutch oven use foil to line it, then grease foil. The only downfall to this method is you can’t pre-heat the oven. I use 9 inch round cake pans or 8 inch square pans. This recipe will make 4 pans of rolls, 8-9 rolls in each pan. Divide dough into 4 equal parts. For round pans, form 8 balls of dough out of each divided part of dough. If using square pans, form 9 balls of dough for each pan. Place balls of dough equal distance apart in greased pans. Cover and rise 20-30 minutes. To pre-heat ovens, place coals on Dutch ovens 10 minutes before baking rolls. Place one pan in each oven, being sure to use foil rings underneath pans. You may have to cook several batches of rolls, or you can stack ovens to conserve charcoal. Bake 15 minutes, then lift lid to check rolls. They should be golden brown when done Bake longer if necessary. If you were cooking in a kitchen oven you would be baking at 400 degrees.

    Better:

    Add 1 reconstituted powdered egg

    Best:

    Replace oil with butter or butter flavored shortening. Replace whole wheat flour with white flour.

     

    Potatoes Au Gratin

    2 C Provident Pantry Instant Non-fat dry milk

    4 C Provident Pantry Potato Slices

    1 tsp Provident Pantry Iodized salt

    1/8 tsp Provident Pantry Black pepper

    2 Tbsp Provident Pantry butter powder

    1 Tbsp Provident Pantry Chopped onions

    1 C Provident Pantry freeze-dried cheddar cheese

    2 Tbsp Provident Pantry white flour

    Reconstitute potato slices according to directions on can; Drain excess water. Measure milk into 2-quart saucepan. Add potatoes, salt, pepper, chopped onions, and butter. Bring to boil. Reduce heat; simmer until almost tender, about 6 minutes. Remove from heat, add cheese, and stir carefully until just melted. Sprinkle flour over surface. Stir gently then pour into greased Dutch oven. Use 19 coals on top and 10 coals on bottom if you are using a 12 inch baking pan (having this many coals on top and bottom will raise the temperature of your oven to 400 degrees). Bake at 400°F for 20 minutes until browned.

     

    MAIN DISHES

    Dutch oven Chicken Noodle Soup

    1 1/2 cups Provident Pantry freeze-dried white chicken, broken into small pieces

    5 cups water

    2 cups Provident Pantry egg noodle Pasta

    ½ tsp MyChoice™Premium garlic powder

    1 Tbsp. Provident Pantry Freeze dried onion

    3 chicken bouillon cubes, or 3 teaspoons bouillon powder.

    1-2 Tbsp. Provident Pantry freeze dried celery, or 1 teaspoon celery powder

    ¼ cup dried Provident Pantry carrot dices or slices

    2 Tbsp. dried parsley

    1 tsp. Provident Pantry Iodized salt

    ¼ tsp. Provident Pantry black pepper

    Bring the 5 cups of water to boil in Dutch oven, using 20-25 briquettes, all on the bottom.  Add all other ingredients. When soup boils again, remove half of the coals and continue to simmer for 12 to 15 minutes until noodles are tender. Makes about 6 servings.

    Note:  For a creamy, thicker broth, remove ½ cup hot broth and whisk in 2 tablespoons flour and 1 tablespoon powdered milk. Return mixture to soup, stir well and allow to simmer until slightly thickened.

     

    Beef Stroganoff 

    1 c Provident Pantry dry milk

    1 Tbsp. Provident Pantry freeze dried onion

    ½ cup Provident Pantry freeze dried mushrooms

    ½ tsp MyChoice™garlic powder

    1 tsp Provident Pantry iodized salt

    2 beef bouillon cubes (or 2 tsps beef bouillon powder)

    2 cups Provident Pantry egg noodle pasta

    2 Tbsp Provident Pantry White flour

    ¼ cup water

    ¼ cup Provident Pantry sour cream powder

    1 ½ cup Provident Pantry freeze-dried roast beef

    Reconstitute 1 cup powdered milk with 4 cups of water (or a combination of half evaporated milk and half water). Place in Dutch oven with dried onion, dried mushrooms, garlic powder, salt, and beef bouillon cubes or powder. Mix well and bring to a boil over hot coals. Add 2 cups egg noodles and 1 ½ cups freeze-dried roast beef broken into bite-sized pieces. When noodles are nearly done, whisk in 2 tablespoons* flour mixed with ¼ cup water. When they are done, stir in sour cream powder. (If you happen to have it, add 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce.) Cook for 3 hours (or until noodles and beef are done). Use 4 briquettes on bottom and 12 on top if using a 12 inch oven (replenish briquettes every half hour).

     

    Now that these recipes have made you good and hungry for dinner, we’ve saved some room in our Dutch oven series for dessert! Check out our final installment of our Dutch oven series, “Dutch oven Recipes—Desserts  ”

     

    Want to read the rest of our Dutch oven series? Click the links below!

    Dutch Oven Basics Part One: Picking Your Oven

    Dutch Oven Basics Part Two: Prepping and Cooking with Your Oven

    Dutch Oven Basics Part Three: Breakfast Recipes

    Dutch Oven Basics Part Five: Desserts

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: recipes, recipe, Dutch oven, cooking, outdoor cooking, emergency cooking, Main Dish, Side Dish

  • iStock_000004149794XSmall_Dutch Oven

    Now that you’ve learned how to pick a Dutch oven for outdoor cooking it’s time to learn how to prep it and cook with it! Dutch oven cooking has become almost an art for people like Byron Bills and also for Archie and Linda Dixon, authors of Don’t be Afraid of Your Food Storage . . . Just Dutch It! As converts to Dutch oven cooking, the Dixons are living proof that even a beginner can master Dutch oven cooking.

    Cooking without electricity is a very important skill to have for your emergency survival. Since Dutch oven cooking is a delicate process, let’s talk about how to prep your oven and how to cook with it, so you can become a Dutch oven cooking master!

     

    Prepping Your Oven: How to Season Your Oven

    You can buy pre-seasoned cast iron Dutch ovens, skillets, and griddles. If you choose to season your own, you can follow the steps below.

    Cast iron must be seasoned before use by having shortening, bacon grease, lard or certain vegetable oils rubbed into the inside and outside surfaces and baked on. Some vegetable oils become sticky, so choose a good oil. The best choices for seasoning cast iron are flaxseed oil, soybean oil, and canola oil. A good explanation of why can be found in this informative article by Sheryl Canter. She also includes great steps for getting a nice seasoning on your pan. It’s more involved than the steps below, but seems to give fantastic results.

    A cast iron oven that has been properly seasoned and cared for can last for generations. Seasoning is a much more intricate process than merely rubbing a couple of oils on and calling it good. Follow Sheryl's process or the Dixon’s tips for preparing your new oven:

    1. After washing out your oven with warm water, wipe the dry oven and the lid all over with a lightly oiled paper towel or cotton cloth while the oven is still warm. After oiling the Dutch oven, place it in your kitchen oven on the bottom rack at 350 degrees with lid ajar. Bake one hour.
    2. You may get strange smelling fumes so turn on your kitchen fan and open a few windows (This process should be done before there is an emergency, ie. No power). If you can’t use your kitchen oven and have a barbeque with a lid, you can use that instead.
    3. Once the Dutch oven has cooled down, remove it, oil it, and bake it again. Leave it in the kitchen oven until warm, remove it, then oil it lightly one more time. Your oven is ready to use.
    4. Your oven will turn a golden color, but after you use it several times it will have a black shine. If your oven rusts, scrape off the rust with steel wool, and repeat the oiling process again.

    Cooking Your Food with Charcoal

    1. Use good quality briquettes and place hot charcoal in a circle (rather than a pile) under the oven, so air can circulate. Place briquettes in a checkerboard pattern on the lid. Avoid bunching coals either under or on top of your oven, as this can cause hot spots and possibly burn food.
    2. To attain certain temperatures in your oven, add or remove hot coals to the lid and under the oven. For example, to achieve 350° F., use a ring of very hot coals under the oven (about 3-4 between each leg) and place briquettes in a checkerboard pattern on lid (about 15-16). Check out Prepping to Survive’s advice on how to heat a Dutch oven to 350 degrees. Since this is not as exact a gauge as your kitchen oven, you may need to learn by experimenting with the number of coals and checking your food as it is approaching the time when it should be done. Some experts have learned to test the temperature by counting how many seconds they can hold their hand over an open oven!
    1. To roast food, place an equal number of coals above and below the oven. To simmer soups and stews, place 1/3 of the coals on the lid and 2/3 below the oven. Several ovens may be stacked (largest on the bottom) with coals on top of each oven.

    Use this temperature guide can help you determine how many coals you will need to heat your Dutch oven to a specific temperature.

    Temperature Scale

     

    Using your Oven to Bake

    For baking, either obtain a baking rack for the bottom of your Dutch oven or make one very simply by tightly rolling an 8-inch sheet of aluminum foil like a snake, then shaping it into a ring or coil and flattening it slightly. If you are baking a pie, breads, or anything with that uses a dough, place the dough/crust in a loaf or pie pan and put the pan into the Dutch oven. Make sure that you either use the aluminum coil or a slightly flattened foil ball to place the loaf or pie pan on so that the bottom of your pan does not sit directly on the Dutch oven. If your pan does sit directly on the floor of your Dutch oven, the bottom of your baked goods will burn.

     

    Other Helpful Tips and Tricks

    1. Never pour cold liquid into a very hot oven—it will crack.
    1. Don’t allow cast iron ovens to soak in water—wash quickly in hot water (no soap) and dry with a cloth, then re-season. (Some suggest placing it over heat again for 10-20 minutes to dry out any remaining moisture before rubbing down with oil and storing).
    1. Don’t place an empty cast iron oven over a hot fire—use coals

    Now that you know how to prep and cook with your Dutch oven, check back tomorrow for the next installment in our Dutch oven mini-series, “Dutch Oven Recipes—Breakfast.”

    Check out the rest of our series:

    Dutch oven Basics Part One: Picking Your Oven

    Dutch oven Basics Part Three: Breakfast Recipes

    Dutch oven Basics Part Four: Sides and Main Dishes

    Dutch oven Basics Part Five: Desserts

     

    Chart Source:

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: recipes, Dutch oven, cooking, outdoor cooking, mini series, emergency cooking

  • Summer is a great time to experiment with alternative cooking methods, so we’re highlighting Dutch ovens in a week-long series of posts.

    Dutch ovens produce some of the tastiest meals by using a constant heat maintained over a longer duration. This series will take you from getting your first Dutch oven to creating a magnum opus. Enjoy!

    SONY DSC

    Dutch Oven Basics—Picking Your Oven

    “How many of us would know how to cook for our families if electricity and natural gas were suddenly gone? With the Dutch oven skills I’ve learned over the years, I have confidence that I can cook my family a good hot meal at any time, regardless of our ‘current’ circumstances!” ~ Byron Bills, Expert Dutch oven chef

    Dutch oven cooking may intimidate you, but the basics are fairly easy to master even if you are a beginner. Here are some tips for picking a Dutch oven.

    Indoor or Outdoor: What’s the Difference?

    The first rule for picking a Dutch oven is deciding whether you want to use your oven for indoor or outdoor cooking. Indoor ovens have flat bottoms and are meant to sit on the rack in conventional ovens. Outdoor ovens have three legs that sit over hot coals, and a lid with a lip. This lip is meant to keep the coals from sliding off.

    You can use indoor Dutch ovens outdoors, but you’ll need to make a few adjustments. For this series we’ll be focusing on outdoor ovens.

    Types of Ovens: Cast Iron and Cast Aluminum

    Dutch ovens are made from either cast iron or cast aluminum; each type has its own benefits and drawbacks.

    Aluminum ovens can be washed with soapy water. Aluminum is also better used for foods that need to cool quickly once they’re cooked, but cooking temperatures can vary based on wind or atmospheric temperature changes.

    Cast iron is preferred by many Dutch oven professionals because it keeps a more even cooking temperature and keeps food warm longer. Also, cast iron ovens like the Volcano are very durable and can last for generations.

    Follow your manufacturer’s recommendations for washing, drying, and seasoning a new Dutch oven before using it. In general, cast iron ovens should NOT be washed with soapy water (unless you have just taken it out of the package for the first time). Putting soap in a cast iron oven will destroy the ‘seasoning’ and will seep into the pores, where it can leach out into your next meal.

    Seasoning refers to the vegetable oil or butters that you coat the Dutch oven with before each use. Seasoning stays within the walls of a Dutch oven during each use, building up over time. It prevents rust and corrosion and creates a non-stick cooking surface. Don’t get rid of the seasoning!

    Oven Sizes

    Dutch ovens come in sizes from 8 to 22 inches in diameter. The depths vary too, giving you a wide range of choices.

    The smallest ovens are good for vegetables, sauces, side dishes and desserts; the largest will accommodate a good-sized turkey with vegetables. Don’t forget that the bigger your Dutch oven, the more it will weigh. Byron has a 49 quart Dutch oven that weighs 158 pounds—empty!

    Because of the weight and size of Dutch ovens, you want to choose an oven with three sturdy legs; skinny legs might break.

    If you’re only purchasing one oven, the 12-inch size, that holds about 6 quarts, is probably the most useful. A 10-inch and a 14-inch would also be very handy to have, especially if you’re cooking several foods at the same time.

    Keep in mind that when you’re cooking you can stack several ovens (smallest on top) and conserve coals by placing them between ovens, as they will heat both upward and downward.

     

    Oven Accessories (You’re Going to Need These!!)

    • You will want a shovel, a selection of tongs and hooks, and good insulated leather gloves to help you handle your hot, heavy ovens. A whisk broom is handy to brush ashes off lids before you open the oven.
    • Charcoal chimney starter
    • Consider keeping your charcoal in a large bucket or garbage can topped with a tight-fitting lid.

    Now that you’ve learned how to pick a Dutch oven, you can learn how to cook with it!

    Check out the next installment of our Dutch Oven Mini Series, “Dutch Oven Basics—Prepping and Cooking with your Oven.”

    Check out the rest of our Dutch oven series:

    Dutch oven Basics Part Two: Prepping and Cooking with Your Oven

    Dutch oven Basics Part Three: Breakfast Recipes

    Dutch oven Basics Part Four: Sides and Main Dishes

    Dutch oven Basics Part Five: Desserts

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: recipes, Dutch oven, cooking, outdoor cooking, mini series, emergency cooking