Welcome to Emergency Essentials!

Catalog Request

Search results for: 'water-storage'

  • Avoiding a Royal Flush: Recent Water Shortages in Areas Just Like Yours

    During the Super Bowl, water conservation efforts in Macomb County, Mich., kept crappers from coming a cropper. (OR helped a broken sewer pipe avoid a royal dump. OR prevented a royal flush that could have further damaged a broken sewer pipe and sinkhole.)

    Sinkhole - via AP water shortage Good news: flushing toilets didn't make the sinkhole worse - via AP

    On February 2, the county public works chief warned that halftime flushing during the Super Bowl could overwhelm a broken 11-foot-wide sewer pipe and send sewage into neighborhood basements. The broken line had already created a 250-foot by 100-foot sinkhole that ate three homes. But she said on February 6 that actions like people flushing less (when they did, would that be a royal flush?) and restaurants serving food on paper plates prevented the disaster.

    At any time, you might have to reduce water use or use bottled water. The same week Macomb County public works officials worried about sewer overflow, water managers in Pittsburgh, Pa., and Chapel Hill, N.C., told residents to boil or avoid tap water.

    In Pittsburgh on January 31, the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority issued a boil water advisory for 100,000 customers, including schools, restaurants and hospitals. Tests of the city’s water supply showed there wasn’t enough chlorine in the water at a treatment plant. The advisory ended February 2.

    In Chapel Hill, a broken water main February 2 immediately followed by a water treatment plant shutdown February 3 caused the boil water notice and, later, a water shortage.  Students at the University of North Carolina and businesses around the school were most affected. A basketball game between UNC and Notre Dame had to be postponed and moved. The school canceled classes the afternoon of February 3. Although the boil water notice ended February 5, Orange County, N.C. officials asked people to keep conserving water because the broken pipe caused a water shortage.

    Ready.gov says a person needs an average of a gallon of water per day. Here are three ways to make sure you’ve got clean water handy when you need it.

    First, assume you won’t be able to buy water. The water emergency in Chapel Hill lasted two days. Residents could still use tap water for many things. Trucks could easily resupply stores. Yet stores reported runs on water and empty shelves.

    Ready.gov recommendsMan_Standing_Updated water shortage you store a gallon of water per person per day for three days.  Commercially bottled water is the safest and most reliable water for storage, according to ready.gov. It’s easy to store and lasts longer than home-bottled water. Just don’t open it and be aware of the expiration dates on the bottles. Food-grade water storage containers are also available here. When filling them, if your water comes from a well or if your utility doesn’t treat water with chlorine, add two drops of non-scented liquid chlorine bleach to each gallon of water. Check the water after a half hour. If it doesn’t have a slight bleach smell, re-treat it and wait 15 minutes. Ready.gov recommends you replace home-bottled water every six months.

    Second, think about all the ways you use water – like washing dishes – and plan substitutes.

    In Macomb County, Mich., some restaurants used paper plates on Super Bowl Sunday to reduce their water use.

    Do you have enough disposable dishes on hand that you could minimize dish washing for a few days? Even reusable water bottles should be washed daily.

    Third, be prepared for long-term water shortages. Consider buying a water filter for your home or water taps.

    After three years of lead-laced water in Flint, Mich., the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality finally found that lead concentrations in Flint tap water were below the federal limit. The DEQ didn’t recommend Flint residents start using unfiltered tap water, though. As pipes get replaced and flushed throughout the city, lead concentration could spike in individual homes.

    If you’re considering a home water filter, first think about why you want one, suggests the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The main function of the activated carbon filters found in fridges and pitchers is to change the water’s taste. They may not fully protect against contaminants. If a test to your water system shows organic contaminants, you may want a full-house or point-of-entry filter system so you can use the water for bathing and cleaning as well as cooking and drinking.

    Second, all water filters should be NSF-certified. NSF-certified filters can remove lead. Check the labels on filters, because no water filter removes everything. Consider things like cost of the filter system, how much filtered water you need and how a system might fit into your home.

    Third, maintain your filters. Change them on schedule.

    “Filters that are not well maintained can do more harm than good,” the CDC wrote.

     

    Disaster_Blog_Banner water shortage

  • Lingering Drought (and Not Just in California)

    Step aside, California; you’re not the only one dealing with drought in this country.

    The entire state of Alabama is under some sort of drought condition, ranging from abnormally dry to exceptional drought. The last time the whole of Alabama faced drought conditions was back in 2011.

    nj-drought-monitor-comparison Lingering DroughtBut it’s not just Alabama. New Jersey is also drying up, and dry weather looks to be on the docket for a while yet. While not as bad as Alabama or California (can anywhere be as bad as California?), severe drought is creeping in along the Northeast. Lack of rain and snow in 2016 is a large factor in these drought conditions.

    While Georgia isn’t completely parched, it is quite dry in many areas. In fact, at the beginning of the 2016 calendar year, there wasn’t even a trace of moderate drought. Now there’s plenty of moderate, severe, extreme, and even exceptional drought conditions.

    But wait! There’s more! Mississippi is also suffering. A handful of counties are afflicted with extreme drought, while the majority is facing moderate to severe drought. About a third of the state is “just” abnormally dry. Only two counties are unaffected by drought conditions. In all, Georgia’s farmers are really starting to feel it.

    Of course, California isn’t doing so great, either.

    As a nation, there are a lot of parched states. IN fact, there are only a select few that don’t have any drought conditions at all. That being said, there are still plenty of areas that are receiving plenty of water, despite their state having some form of dryness. So all is not lost!

    us-drought-monitor-as-of-october-11-2016 Lingering DroughtHowever, the U.S. Drought Monitor shows that certain areas are more affected than others. Take a look at the map here and see if you live in one of those areas. If you do, now is the perfect time to start preparing your water storage. Invest in a water barrel (or two) and fill them before you’re on a water restriction. This is one way to ensure you have enough water before any restrictions are put into place. And this water is not just for drinking, but washing and cleaning as well.

    Drought can happen in any state, and if you are fortunate to not be affected by it at this time, take precautions now so that when the drought does come to your neighborhood, you’ll be ready.

     

    Disaster_Blog_Banner Lingering Drought

  • How Political Rallies and Demonstrations Prompt Better Emergency Preparedness

    election Time to talk about the elephant in the room...

    Politics.

    It’s all over the news, and now you’re reading a blog about it. But this isn’t your generic “Vote for Pedro” blog. This article instead examines the rough time this country is having during the election season, and what it means for personal preparedness.

    No matter who you support in this election, chances are you see the other candidates as wacky and dangerous to the country. Chances are those supporters think the same thing about your candidate. So who is right? That’s beside the point. The point is, the majority of Americans don’t seem to be very pleased with one or more of the candidates, and that has already led to some protests and demonstrations.

    We’ve talked about protests and civil unrest on the blog before, but never (as far as I’m aware) in the vein of politics. Of course, politics can be a touchy subject, so we’ll steer clear of the candidate’s platforms and focus on the emergency preparedness side of what’s going on. Let’s look at what’s happened so far.

    Trump Rally election

    Back in March 2016, a certain candidate held a rally in the suburbs of Phoenix, Arizona. Well, some people didn’t want others to attend, so they blocked an Arizona highway that led to the location of the rally. Trucks were towed out of the way, and people were arrested. All in all, a fairly subdued display, however annoying to be blocked from getting to town if you live there.

    In New York City, however, more protesters marched in a show of solidarity and determination. In this instance, tear gas was used to disperse the crowd and keep them from moving past barriers. For civilians in the area, that’s looking a little too dangerous.

    Over and over again in the news we hear of protests turning violent, demonstrations getting heated, and tensions rising whenever politics is even mentioned. As Election Day comes steadily closer, fears of escalating violence is something on the minds of many. Even after the elections, what then?

    One thing is certain, however, and that is uncertainty.

    Uncertainty is actually quite normal these days. Natural disasters, the economy, civil unrest…there are many events that could strike without warning and change lives. So how are you supposed to deal with all this uncertainty? It’s simple, really.

    Prepare.

    We’ve talked about preparing for natural disasters numberless times. But when it comes to preparing for civil unrest and the uncertainty which is our future? Basically, prepare much the same way as you would for any other emergency. Emergency water, food, and gear will get you through pretty much anything. Of course, having some extra emergency cash on hand is a great idea, too, just in case ATMs don’t work and you need to buy something really important.

    The examples of rallies and other election mishaps aren’t intended to stir up fearful emotions. Rather, they are just another reminder of what could possibly go wrong, a reminder that even our own communities can be affected, and a reminder that above all, the time to prepare is now.

     

    Disaster_Blog_Banner election

1-3 of 60

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
  6. ...
  7. 20
Back to Top