Search results for: 'water storage'

  •  brunette woman drinking water from a bottle on a warm day

    Every cell in our bodies contains water, and we need a constant supply to stay alive and healthy. We can do without food for a surprising period of time if we must, but we survive only a few days—3 to 4 in hot weather—without water. When we are dehydrated, our kidneys begin to shut down, our heart races, our body temperature rises, and our electrolytes get out of balance, causing fuzzy vision and thinking (making it even harder to find sources of water).  

     

    How much water do we need to store?

    Whatever kind of emergency arises, we soon realize that clean, drinkable water is the most important substance we need. At least one gallon per person per day is recommended—not only for drinking, but for cooking and hygiene. It’s wise to store at least two weeks’ worth (14 gallons) for each person in your household.

    What kind of containers are best?

    Water is heavy—8 lbs. per gallon. It’s great to have a couple of 55-gallon barrels for sheltering in place—but once filled, they can’t be moved. If you had time in an emergency situation, you could siphon some of that water into 1 or 5-gallon containers to take with you. We suggest, however, that you store some water in small, portable containers that you can grab and go in case of an evacuation order. Keep some in your car for unforeseen situations. Here is a list of the types of containers that work best for water storage:

    Small Containers

    • You can purchase water in small boxes—AquaBlox or Datrex metallized (Mylar-type) pouches for total convenience.WS-P100
    • Be sure that whatever containers you choose are BPA-free, Polyethylene-based plastics or those numbered #1, #2, or #4, or “Mylar” are safe for water storage. It is true, however, that plastic is porous (even though it doesn't appear to be), and eventually allows the water to absorb odors and tastes from the environment. Because of this permeability factor, we do not recommend using plastic milk bottles or similar bottled-water plastic gallon jugs for long-term water storage. Another reason is that they usually allow light through, and light encourages growth of any microorganisms that might be present. It’s difficult to get all bacteria out of a milk jug, for example.
    • For your personal water bottle that you carry with you, be sure it also is BPA-free. If it’s marked with a #1, “PETE,” or “PET,” it should be fine.

    Water Barrels and Combos

    • Large, shelter-in-place storage containers start with the 160-gallon reserve. It is made from an enhanced plastic which is BPA-free, UV resistant, and non-permeable, and which has a faucet for easy access. These can be stacked two-high.
    • Our water barrels (55-gallon, 30-gallon, and 15-gallon) are made from thick, durable food-grade plastic, blue in color to limit light-exposure and discourage bacterial and algae growth.
    • You will need a siphon and a bung wrench to fill and access these barrels. For both the barrels and the 160-gallon reserve, it’s advisable to place them on a wooden pallet rather than a cement floor, and away from sunlight.

    Siphon water from larger containers into portable containers

    Portable water containers and Aqua pods

    • Several other portable water containers are available as well, including 5-gallon Mylar-type bags which are good for short or long-term storage, and jugs with handles and spouts which are useful in case you must carry water from your large container to your kitchen or fetch water home from another source such as an emergency relief truck.
    • A unique, temporary water storage device is the AquaPod Kit—a giant bladder that fits into your bathtub and holds 65 gallons of clean water. This is excellent when a hurricane is threatening, or when you know ahead of time that your water supply is going to be cut off a while for repairs.

    How long does water keep?

    Since water (unlike food) does not “go bad” or expire, you can safely store it for an indefinite period of time in clean, appropriate containers. It can, however, become contaminated if chemicals or microorganisms get in, so there are ways to treat and purify it—see our next blog on that subject! If it makes you feel better, you can rotate your water supply every year or two to be sure it’s still good. Any “stale” taste in stored water can be quickly overcome by pouring some back and forth between glasses or pitchers to re-introduce oxygen into it.

     

    However you choose to store water, it’s a gift to your present peace-of-mind as well as a protection against possible dehydration—and in any emergency situation in which your water supply was disrupted or contaminated, you and your family would be very glad for your foresight!

    Posted In: Uncategorized

  • One of the first steps you need to take to get prepared is make an emergency plan. Whether you live alone or with family, friends, or roommates, it’s important to be on the same page with your household, as well as those who don’t live with you but will be anxious to locate and touch base with you in an emergency.

    A basic plan is a good place to start, and we've got a great (and free) fill-in-the-blank Emergency Plan PDF so you can have a custom family emergency plan in 10 minutes or less.

    Sample Family Emergency Plan

     

    You can build a more comprehensive plan from there if you’d like, but this plan covers the basics:

    1) Grab survival kits/emergency kits/bug-out bags

    2) Designated meeting point near the home

    3) Designated meeting point in the neighborhood

    4) An out-of-town relative or friend that everyone can call to check in with (it’s pretty common for local lines to be busy following a disaster—your best bet for reaching each other is to call someone with a long-distance number and leave messages for each other).

    5) Out-of town meeting place/evacuation location

    6) Evacuation plan with primary and secondary exits from each room

    7) Emergency Contact Information

    8) Evacuation assignments (who will take what based on how much time you have)

    So, whether you’re just getting started in prepping or you’ve been building food and water storage for years, be sure you’ve got an emergency plan in place—it’s one of the most fundamental (and easiest) things you can do when it comes to emergency preparedness.

    --Sarah

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: planning, Emergency plan, emergency preparedness, getting started, Free Download, Family evacuation plan, preparedness basics

  •  

    Woman Fills Survey

    If you’re new to preparedness, the best piece of advice we can give you is this:

     You don’t have to do it all at once.

    This Preptember™ we want to help you start prepping one step at a time. There are six major areas that you should consider when you start to prepare. Here are a few articles, books, and checklists to get you started in each area:

    Emergency Plans

    Planning for an Emergency

    Evacuating from Home in an Emergency

    Practicing your Family Evacuation Plan

    Emergency and Evacuation Plan Checklist (downloadable/printable)

    Emergency Kits

    Emergency Kit

    Getting Started on an Emergency Kit or Bug-Out-Bag

    Special Considerations for Emergency Kits (small children/babies, elderly, etc.)

    Emergency Kit Checklist (downloadable/printable)

    Food Storage

    Introduction to Food Storage

    15 Tips for Food Storage Shopping

    Eat What You Store

    Storing Non-Food Items

    Water Storage (including filtration and purification)

    Water Storage Overview

    Water Storage Options

    Water Filtration and Purification

    Gear/Equipment

    Equipment Tools for an emergency

    Emergency Shelter

    7 Tips for Choosing a Sleeping Bag

    First Aid & Sanitation

    First Aid First

    Sanitation and Hygiene during an Emergency

    First Aid Skills (CPR, Allergic reactions, breaks and sprains, etc.) [See our Recent Blog First Aid Series]

     

    General Resources

    Checklist and Insight Articles

    Emergency Plans and Checklists (downloadable/printable)

    Insight Articles (educational articles that give tips, skills, and techniques in the 6 areas listed above)

    Books

    Emergency Essentials Tips for Preparedness Book

    Wilderness and Travel Medicine

    Food Storage in a Nutshell 

    Newspaper article

    2013 Deseret News Emergency Essentials Preptember™ Insert

    Check out our blog all this month for more prepping basics and articles in honor of National Preparedness month.

    Happy Prepping!

    Experienced and New Preppers: How did you start your emergency preparedness plan? What did you do to make emergency preparedness less overwhelming?

    We’d love to hear your advice!

    --Angela

    Posted In: Uncategorized

  • Don’t you just love September? The crisp air, the football games, the iodine tablets. That’s right, folks. It’s Preptember™ once again! And what better way to celebrate National Preparedness Month than with a blog series?

    This year we’re taking it back to the basics: we’ll be talking all month about easy ways to get started in emergency preparedness, simple strategies for maintenance, and how to master the bare essentials. So, if you’re overwhelmed and feeling “stuck” when it comes to preparing for emergencies, this is the ideal month to tune in.

    Family together at the computer

    Just to tempt you (I know, you’re already tempted!), here are a few of the topics coming down the pike this month:

    • Water storage: it’s way easier than it sounds.
    • Food storage: start small. Oh, and how to make it palatable. Because food storage doesn’t have to (and shouldn’t) be gross.
    • Gear: what’s crucial and what can you skip?
    • Survival: you may not be Bear Grylls, but we’ll teach you how to hold your own.
    • “Slow & Steady”: time vs. money when building your store of supplies.

    Our goal is to shake you from paralysis in the face of your daunting to-do list and show you how manageable it is to chip away at preparedness a little at a time. We all want to save ourselves time, money, and stress, so let us walk you through the most important practices and principles.

    Have a topic you really want to learn about? Let us know in the comments!

    --Stacey

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: emergency preparedness, getting started, Preptember, National Preparedness Month

  • iStock_000016955692XSmall_Blonde_Woman_Drinks_Water

    On Friday, June 28th, Lindon, Utah, a town of about 10,348 inhabitants, issued a drinking water restriction for its residents because an E. coli outbreak was discovered in the city’s water system. Since Emergency Essentials headquarters is located in Orem, Utah, right next door to Lindon, this E. coli outbreak hit rather close to home for some of our employees.

    On Friday night, I watched Utah’s ABC 4 news report about the E. coli outbreak. Reporters stated that city officials say that the entire water system would have to be flushed out and every tank and pipe in the city would have to be disinfected. The city issued mandatory boil order for its residents until the water was cleaned and the restriction was lifted on June 30th.

    This mandatory water restriction/boil order raises some interesting questions for emergency preparedness. How common and realistic is this scenario? What would you do if a water restriction was issued in your area? Have you already experienced this?

    The Utah Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) has issued recommendations on how to boil and store water if a water restriction is announced in your city. Here are some things you should consider doing to help you and your family stay safe:

    -          Bring water to a rolling boil for a minimum of one minute

    -          When it cools, you can pour your clean water into clean containers and refrigerate

    -          Adding a pinch of salt per quart to your boiled water may improve the taste

    -          Instead of boiling water, you can also disinfect it by adding 1/8 teaspoon of bleach (common household bleach containing 5.25 percent sodium hypochlorite) per gallon of water. Do not use bleach containing perfume, dyes, or other additives.

    When a boil order is issued, it pertains to almost all the ways you use water in your household—the obvious exception being flushing the toilet. The DEQ even has a chart that shows what tasks in your home should be done with boiled water. But having to boil water to do simple everyday tasks—washing your face, brushing your teeth, or cooking your food—could also be annoying and inconvenient.

    If boiling your water is inconvenient, many might say: “Well why not just buy a ton of bottled water? Problem solved!” While bottled water may seem like an easy solution to your water restriction woes (and in many instances it can be), in a water restriction, bottled water can get cleared off the shelves as quickly as bread, milk, and eggs in a snow storm. Also, if the city does not know how long the boil order might last buying bottled water could get pricey.

    So, when you can’t rely on bottled water, what’s another alternative you can turn to? –Water Storage! If you have an adequate supply of water storage (the recommended minimum amount of water to store is one gallon per day, per person, for 14 days), you will not have to worry about boiling your water or worrying that bottled water will run out at the store.

    Our product specialist, Tim, currently lives in Lindon and had to host part of his family reunion during the water restriction.  In order to make it through his family reunion, Tim is relying on water storage from his 55 gallon barrels and 160 gallon reserve tank system.

    He also plans to use a Katadyn Base Camp Gravity Filter to supply water for his guests. You simply hang the Base Camp Gravity Filter up and it filters up to 2 gallons of water in 15 minutes with no pumping. It will clean up to 200 gallons of water before you have to change out the filter component.

    If you are interested in building up a water storage supply, check out our Insight Article, "Water Storage Options", look into our water storage product page, and consider buying a water storage combo.

    Here is one piece of advice Tim shared for surviving a water boiling order: Once you have enough boiled water stored, shut off the valves to your faucets so your family doesn’t use the sinks out of habit. Don’t turn off the main water valve because you’ll still want to flush the toilet and get more water from the sink if you need to boil more.

    Be prepared for a water restriction or boiling order in your area. Learn how to adequately boil water and store water.

    If you’ve been through a boil order before, what tips do you have?

     

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: water, water storage

  • Today's Possible Derecho

    June Blizzard Derecho

     

    If you live in the Midwest you want to be especially watchful today.

    Large hail, strong winds, lighting, and possible tornadoes may cause widespread power outages. That would mean your access to water, air conditioning, and electricity could be reduced, or possibly eliminated if the storms get strong enough.

    Here’s an article from ABC news that sums up today’s storm situation and a succinct video that shows maps of the potentially affected areas.

    Stock up on important survival items like water storage containers, alternative lighting, and food that doesn’t need to be cooked (include links). Consider how you will keep cool if your AC is out.

    For those of you travelling this week, make sure you keep checking the weather. If you’re flying, expect flight delays or cancellations. If you’re driving, keep an emergency kit in your car, make sure to have alternate routes mapped out (check out baby step #4), and know where accommodations are so that you can find shelter if you need it.

    We suggest following NOAA and FEMA’s Twitter feeds for your region. We’ll also keep you posted via our Emergency Essentials Twitter feed as we receive information we’ll tweet storm watches and warnings from 8 am -5 pm MST. If you don’t use Twitter, or if we’re not Tweeting, check out these websites:

    Good luck this storm season!  

    Posted In: Uncategorized

  • DIY Tent Lamp

    |4 COMMENT(S)

    _MG_8860

    I love ingenuity – how cool is this improvised tent lamp? Really cool, right? It reminded me of this video, Plastic Bottles Light Up Homes in Manilla Slums, which really moved me. I love invention. It’s so great when someone comes up with a money and resource-saving device.

    I tried it myself, with variations:

    • 16 oz plastic water bottle. I took the label off. It’s pretty directional and not much better than the headlamp on its own. Apart from the pretty effect of dappled light on the wall.
    • 12 oz glass water bottle. Even more directional than the 16 oz plastic bottle.
    • 2 liter plastic soda bottle (label off). Better than the 16 oz, but the spread of light was not as amazing as expected.

    _MG_8888

    • Emergency Essentials Mixer Pitcher. (See picture below.) I think this was my fave. The opaque container diffuses the light nicely and leaves enough light for a decent reach.

    If you don’t want to DIY, check out our emergency lighting options. (Our 100 Hour Candles are especially awesome.) But if you do want to build one on your own, all you need is a headlamp (or other light like a flashlight or glowstick) and a plastic water bottle or jug.

    Step One: Fill a plastic bottle or jug with water.

    Step Two: Pour in bleach (optional).

    Step Three: Adjust headlamp to fit securely around container. Or if you’re using a flashlight, place it on the ground next to the container. I aimed the headlamp up, rather than down, because I figured I didn’t need light on the ground.

    Step Four: Bring people over to admire your creation!

    _MG_8901

    From what I can figure out, the water diffracts and diffuses the light (or spreads out the beam). These guys agree with me. I read that it works better if you add bleach (but I also read that the bleach is just there to kill bacteria).

    My conclusion is, the more you can diffuse the light, the more of a “lamp” effect you get. A plastic milk jug works really well because it’s large, stable, and portable. Think of all the possible variations…

    Ooh! A five-gallon water storage jug would be awesome!!! You could put one of these big flashlights next to it.

    Quick, somebody try putting a flashlight in a SuperPail (without water) and see if that works. Is it too opaque?

    Here’s to unique, innovative lighting solutions! You never know what you’ll be able to invent in a pinch. Go preppers!

    ~ Steph

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: essential gear, DIY, Lighting, Headlamps

  • Hurricane Season 2013

    Today, NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center stated that “there is a 70 percent likelihood” that there will be three to six major hurricanes this year with winds above 111 mph. Forecasters suggest that “A year after Superstorm Sandy, residents along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts should prepare for ‘an extremely active’" 2013 hurricane season.

    With this forecast in mind, Kathryn Sullivan, NOAA acting administrator, stated Thursday, "Take time to refresh your hurricane preparedness plan . . . bottom line is become weather-ready now—that means starting today."

    Since 2013’s Hurricane season begins on June 1st, now is the time to prepare for a Hurricane. Here are some basic items that you should consider collecting to prepare you for the upcoming storm season:

    Hurricane Kit Supplies:

    Emergency Kit

    First Aid Kit

    Food Storage (have enough for several weeks)

    Water Storage Supply

    Radio (include extra batteries)

    Tools

    Rain Ponchos

    Sanitation Supplies

     

    For a more comprehensive list of items to include in your Hurricane Kit, take a look at our Hurricane Checklists for before, during, and after the storm.

    Our 5-part mini-series on Hurricane preparedness also provides additional information on things to consider while preparing for a hurricane.

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: hurricanes, hurricane preparedness

  • May 2013 Sale Items

    Oh, boy… have we got some great stuff for you in May.

    First things first. Remember the 160-gallon Water Reserve we introduced you to a couple of weeks ago? Well, we’ve bundled two Water Reserves together with a 50-foot drinking-water-safe hose and 6 Aquamira Water Treatments (three sets) to make the Ultimate Water Reserve Combo. And for this month only we’re selling it at an introductory price of $779.99. (It’s a $1099.99 value, and will regularly sell for $849.95.)

    So, if your water storage situation isn't in order, now would be a great time to make it happen.

    Ultimate Water Reserve Combo (320 Gallons) 320-Gallon Ultimate Water Reserve Combo

    Whole Egg Powder is 27% off

    $15.99 for a #10 can (reg. $21.95)

    $5.99 for MyChoice™ can (reg. $6.95)

    Who says you can’t have a wonderful brunch in a disaster? Keep powdered whole eggs on hand for baked items like cakes, cookies, and casseroles; or whip up delicious breakfast foods like quiche, scrambled eggs, or pancakes.

    Dried Whole Egg Powder - #10 Can Dried Whole Egg Powder - #10 Can

     

    Save 31% on the Fruit and Vegetable Favorites Combo

    $99.99 for 6 #10 cans

    Get a nice assortment of fruits and veggies in one fell swoop. This combo includes freeze dried strawberries, peaches, bananas, green peas, tomatoes, and super sweet corn. They’re favorites for a reason—they are delicious and really easy to use. Snack on them straight from the can, or add them into your favorite dishes. Rehydrate with water for a few minutes, and then treat them like fresh produce that’s pre-chopped and ready to go!

    Fruit and Vegetable Favorites Combo Fruit and Vegetable Favorites Combo

    All Mountain House Pouches are on Sale

    If you’re planning some backpacking, camping, or other outdoorsy fun this summer, stock up now on Mountain House pouches, and take some delicious entrées, wrap fillings, side dishes, and desserts with you!

    Road trip? Pack some pouches and fill a Thermos with hot water at home or along the way; you’ll have great meals without settling for whatever fast food joint or questionable diner you can find on the road.

    These pouches are also a great option for emergency kits—just be sure to pack extra water for reconstituting them.

     

    This is just a lil’ sampling of what we’ve got on sale this month. Check out the rest of our May sale items here.

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: food storage, mountain house, monthly sales, freeze-dried foods, water storage, dehydrated food

  • You've just read about a new desalination technology. We've got a new water technology of our own at Emergency Essentials. A monster of a water storage container. I’m not kidding—it’s huge. It holds 160 gallons of water (that’s the equivalent of three 55-gallon barrels) while taking just 7.2 square feet of floor space. It’s called the WaterPrepared 160 Gallon Water Reserve.

     Here are some quick reasons why we think the Water Reserve is so great (and why we’re sure you’ll think so, too):

    • It’s made with BPA-free plastic.
    • The plastic has been enhanced with UV resistance properties (more sun protection!) to increase the life of your water and the life of the barrel itself.
    • It’s FDA and NSF approved.
    • It’s stackable (up to two high).
    • It fits through a standard door frame so you can put it just about anywhere.

    In reality, you should be storing water even when there’s no drought in sight. If a disaster or emergency were to hit your city, it could be a while before potable water (water that’s safe to drink) became available. For example, after Hurricane Sandy, it was a month before some areas could use their tap water without boiling it first.

    Consider the following: The minimum recommended  amount of stored water per adult is 1 gallon per day. That’s 14 gallons for two weeks. Per adult. And that’s going easy on your water. FEMA guidelines tell people to use ½ of the gallon for drinking and ½ for cooking and washing. On one gallon of water per day you’re gonna feel like you’re camping, even if you’re still living in your house.

    If you have a family of 4 (two adults and two children under 12) you’ll need at least 4 gallons of water daily. That’s if you don’t have to wash up any sticky hands, muddy feet, or poopy diapers/clothing. Or flush the toilets. We recommend that you count your kids as adults; you’ll definitely be able to use the “extra” water. So if you were to store four gallons a day, times 14, you’ll have 56 gallons of water. You may have a bigger family, or pets. You’ll probably also want to drink more water, wash dishes, do a little laundry, wash your hair, flush toilets, and not feel pressured to conserve so strictly. You’re gonna need more water than you think.

    You’ll also need more water if your food storage is built on freeze dried and dehydrated foods. Most food storage is. Generally the food requires less than a cup of water per serving, but you should still factor that info your water supply needs.

    With the Water Reserve you don’t have to rotate your water as frequently, especially if it’s stored properly. And when you do want to access the water there are two taps—in addition to the hose outlets—for easy access.

    The Water Reserve is an innovative solution to many of the common water storage troubles. Get your Water Reserve from Emergency Essentials and save on shipping.

    Here are three articles that give you good information on the basics of storing water.

    1. Water Storage Overview
    2. Water Storage Options 
    3. Water Filtration and Purification

    SOURCES:

    http://www.health.ny.gov/environmental/water/drinking/boilwater/sandy/#s1

    http://www.metroblooms.org/bloomsblog/2012/10/31/hurricane-sandy-effects-water-quality/

    http://water.usgs.gov/

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: water storage

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