Search results for: 'first-aid'

  • Weathering the Worst of Winter Storms

    1_28_15 Weathering the Worst of Winter StormsThe torrential blizzard predicted to bury New York City turned out to be just delightful snow flurries dusting the iconic Manhattan landmarks. For Boston and the rest of New England, however, Winter Storm Juno lived up to its headliner forecast, dumping 3 feet of snow and more before moving on.

    For every American living in snow country, however, Juno served as a wake-up call, reminding us that the best time to prepare for the "big one" is while the sun is shining, before dark clouds appear on the Weather Service radar and time is running out.

    These simple tips will help you get ready for the next time the snow piles up, the power goes out, the roads are closed, and help may be days away.

    Before the Storm...

    ...Put Together a 72-Hour Kit
    The first three days after a big storm are the toughest. With roads closed and walkways buried, running to the store is dangerous, if not impossible. In addition to paralyzing snow and ice, winter storms often cause widespread power outages and broken water pipes. So, a useful 72-hour kit should contain water, heat, light and communications, as well.
    Here is a short list of the types of things you'll likely need until you can venture out after a big winter storm:

    Keeping your Storm Kit in a sturdy backpack makes it ready to go in times when you need to evacuate. Keeping your Storm Kit in a sturdy backpack makes it ready to go in times when you need to evacuate.
    •  Three days of non-perishable foods like canned goods, dried fruits, nuts, and freeze-dried meals
    • A manual can opener
    • Three days of water (at least three gallons per person)
    • First-aid kit, with essential prescription medicines
    • Flashlights, candles and light sticks
    • Cell phone, with hand-crank charger
    • Portable radio or NOAA weather radio
    • Extra radio and flashlight batteries
    • Baby-care items
    • Pet supplies
    • Extra blankets and sleeping bags
    • A fire extinguisher

    Keep in mind that if your workplace is a long commute from home, you'll need the same items at the office (minus baby and pet supplies, perhaps). Plus, keeping an Emergency Car Kit in your trunk will assure you're ready if weather conditions force you to wait for help along the roadside.

    Some simple household chores will help you avoid some serious winter storm damage. Some simple household chores will help you avoid some serious winter storm damage.

    ...Get Your House Ready

    A few regular home maintenance tasks can do more than just keep a neat home. They can also protect you and your family in the event of a big snowfall or ice storm, as well.

    Take time to see to the following:

    • Ice, snow and wind can snap tree limbs down onto the roof, windows and power lines. Trim away tree branches close to your home.
    • Keep rain gutters clean. Otherwise, snow and ice can build up and allow water to seep under the roof and eaves causing damage to walls and ceilings.
    • See that smoke and carbon monoxide (CO) detectors are working and store fresh batteries.
    • Have your chimney flue checked and cleaned, if necessary, to lessen the risk of fire.
    • Make sure your home is properly insulated. Caulk and weather-strip doors and windows to keep out cold air.
    • Install storm windows or cover windows with plastic from the inside to provide insulation.
    • Wrap pipes in insulating foam to keep them from freezing. Let faucets drip a little to avoid freezing.
    • Know how to safely shut off gas, electric power and water valves.
    • Check your homeowner's insurance policy to ensure adequate coverage.

    ...Plan for Lights Out

    We all know that, even in the best of times, power outages are not uncommon. While the occasional unplanned candle-lit evening is a charming break from the routine, extended power outages particularly in stormy weather can present significant problems even dangers. These simple steps can further prepare your family for blackouts, whenever they occur:

    Weathering the Worst of Winter Storms3

    • Power sensing flashlights come on automatically when the power goes out. Plug-in a few around your home. Candles and light sticks should be a prep staple, as well.
    • Furnaces, even gas and oil-fired ones, cannot operate without electricity to power the blowers. An indoor rated kerosene or propane heater will keep living spaces livable.
    • Keep a bit of cash stashed in a safe place, since stores and other services (if they are open) will not be able to process credit and debit cards.
    • Make a practice of refilling your car's tank at the half-empty point. This assures you will have at least a tank half-full when electric gas pumps won't operate.
    • Store ice packs that can be moved into the fridge, or into a small cooler for meds.
    • Know how to release garage door openers so that you can manually open your garage.

    Juno reminds us that winter weather can be hard to forecast. But we can all predict that we'll each take our turn being caught in a dangerous storm. These few simple steps can mean the difference between frantically surviving and comfortably weathering your next winter storm.

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: Current Events, Survival, Winter

  • Preparedness in the News: 5 Things to Know this Week (Jan 4 to Jan 9 2015)

    View in Amarillo Texas Feb 25 2013 - NWS-Amarillo

    View in Amarillo, Texas on Feb. 25, 2013. (Credit: NWS-Amarillo)

    Here are five need-to-know news stories in the world of emergency preparedness for the week of January 4 to January 9.

    1. Weather Channel Teaches Blizzard Facts and Myths

    Amidst turbulent snowstorms across the United States, the Weather Channel released an infographic explaining the true definition of the term “blizzard” (did you know we’ve all been misusing the term all this time?) and providing little known blizzard facts, such as the existence of a “blizzard alley” across the Midwest. Read more at www.weather.com.
    Don’t forget to stock up on hand warmers and blankets, and snag a portable, propane-powered heater in case of power or gas outages that knock the heat out at home.
    For more winter preparedness tips, check out these articles.

    2. California health officials link measles outbreak to Disneyland

    Officials have linked at least nine cases of measles to Disneyland and California Adventure. Three more people are suspected of also carrying the disease. Those ill visited the popular theme parks in late December. Officials are urging those who have visited either park between December 15 and 20 who have symptoms to contact a health care provider immediately. Read more at www.reuters.com.
    Protect yourself and your family from outbreaks through proper vaccinations, good sanitation practices, and knowledge of first aid skills. And be sure to keep your first aid kits well-stocked so you can deal with wounds, burns, and breaks at home or on the go.

    3. President Obama Signs Mississippi Disaster Declaration

    The president has declared a major disaster in Mississippi following a series of tornadoes and severe storms on December 23. Federal funds will be provided to state and local entities for emergency work in Marion County and hazard mitigation across the state. Read more at www.whitehouse.gov.
    For tips on tornado preparedness, look here. Think ahead of time where you’ll go in case of a tornado, hurricane, or severe storm, and check out this article for ideas on what to keep in your storm shelter or safe room.

    4. ‘Culture of preparedness’ necessary to prevent disasters before they happen in Seychelles

    The Republic of Seychelles’ President James Michel is asking the 90,000 island inhabitants to develop a culture of preparedness to help prevent disasters before they occur. Severe weather caused flooding and landslides last weekend on the country’s largest islands. The Republic of Seychelles consists of 115 islands and lies in the Indian Ocean east of Kenya and Tanzania. Read more at www.seychellesnewsagency.com.
    Learn how to prepare for floods here. An emergency kit is always a great starting point for any disaster. Work gloves, tools, and your own power supply can also be pretty crucial in the days after a flood.

    5. UCSF professor shares quake preparedness tips

    Associate Professor of Medicine Matthew Springer of UC San Francisco spoke to a group earlier this week on how to prepare for an earthquake. Springer lectured on the importance of seeking shelter from falling objects underneath something sturdy, as well as building an emergency supply kit. Read more at www.napavalleyregister.com.

    Find Earthquake preparedness tips for before, during, and after a quake here. If you have to evacuate from home after a quake because it has become unsafe, you’ll be glad to have an emergency kit in your car and an evacuation plan already in place.

     

    More Headlines From Around the Globe This Week:
    Cold weather preparedness for your home
    Hyogo to dig wells at schools designated as disaster shelters to ensure water access
    Red Cross to offer disaster preparedness training
    Wind chills so cold in Midwest they could kill
    Nine earthquakes rattle North Texas in under 24 hours

    -- Caroline

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: Preparedness In The News, Current Events

  • How to Survive a Burning Ship

    How to Survive a Burning Ship

    More than 400 people were safely evacuated from a car ferry that caught fire Sunday off Greece’s Adriatic coast. Poor weather conditions made rescue difficult, but Italian and Greek helicopters and rescue teams managed to bring most of the passengers to safety. Unfortunately, there were 10 casualties.

    The boat drifted in rough seas between Italy and Greece as passengers waited to be rescued. The cause of the fire is still unknown, and attempts to tow the ship to shore ended when the tow cables broke overnight. Italian and Albanian magistrates are debating whether to continue attempting to tow the boat for investigation.

    The U.S. Coast Guard’s 2011 Recreational Boating Statistics Report listed 218 boating accidents that year involving a fire or explosion. Though there were losses in the ferry fire, passengers and rescuers worked together to bring most of the passengers safely to shore.

    The problem with boat fires is that you cannot simply run across the street to escape it; the only way to escape a boat fire is to await rescue or go overboard, which can be nearly as dangerous.

     

    HOW TO SURVIVE A BURNING SHIP

    Plan Ahead

    Thinking ahead of the best way to respond to a boat fire increases the probability you’ll remain calm and react correctly should one break out. Boat fires can go from smoke to inferno in minutes, so every moment counts. If possible, test safety equipment ahead of time to ensure you will know how to use it in the heat of the moment.

    Wear a Life Jacket

    First and foremost, put on a life jacket in case you do need to go (or accidentally go) overboard. Life jackets are designed to keep your head above water and in a position that helps you breathe when in the water. Keep in mind that adult-sized life jackets are not suitable for children. A life jacket should fit snugly and won’t allow the child’s chin or ears to slip through.

    Locate an Escape Route

    If the boat is docked, escape is simple. You can even bypass the life jackets and just get off the boat. In this case, call the firefighters to handle the fire for you; professionals are always a good bet.

    If the boat is at sea or in other deep waters when fire breaks out, escape can be more challenging—and, of course, the bigger the boat, the more complex your route can be. Every time you step foot on a large boat, like a ferry or cruiseliner, take note of the emergency plan (which should be posted in a public area of a ferry, as well as posted in your state room on a cruise ship), and pay attention during the “boring” emergency practice drill you’re required to attend on a cruise.

    Attempt to Extinguish the Flames

    If a fire extinguisher is handy, aim it at the base of the flames and discharge it, using a back and forth sweeping motion. Remember P.A.S.S:
    • Pull pin,
    • Aim at base of fire
    • Squeeze handle
    • Sweep side to side
    Never use water on an electric, gasoline, grease, or oil fire. Fifty-five percent of boat fires are caused by wiring and appliance malfunctions. Be sure that the fire extinguisher you are using is appropriate for the type of fire you’re facing. If the fire cannot be contained, the boat will be lost.

    Watch this video on methods for fighting various boat fires:

    Move Away from the Fire

    If the fire is uncontainable, move away from it, closing doors and hatches behind you, and move windward if possible. At this point, you’ll need to decide whether to wait for rescue or abandon ship.

    Bear in mind that the smoke and chemicals released in the fire can be more dangerous than the fire itself.

    Abandon Ship, if Necessary

    If possible, enter the life raft directly from the boat; avoid swimming to reach the raft. Bring a radio distress beacon on board the raft along with emergency supplies, such as important medication, water, a Swiss army knife, a whistle, a flashlight and a first-aid kit (many life rafts and escape boats will already be equipped with these supplies; that’s the kind of information you’ll want to know in advance). If you are traveling in foreign waters, bring travel documents as well.

    Once on board the raft, get to a safe distance from the burning boat. Try to stay dry and stay warm by huddling with other raft passengers. If there is no supply of drinking water on the raft or escape boat, arrange to collect rainwater and ration it to a maximum of half a quart per person per day.

    Preparedness is Key

    The more you are prepared for a boat fire when traveling by sea, the more likely you’ll able to handle it calmly, should it happen. More than 400 passengers aboard the car ferry did the right thing in a tough situation and lived to tell about it.

    Sources
    http://www.boatus.com/seaworthy/fire/
    http://www.nordhavn.com/resources/tech/boat_fires.php
    http://www.boat-ed.com/pennsylvania/studyGuide/Preventing-Fires-and-What-to-Do-if-Fire-Erupts-on-Your-Boat/101039_101039194
    http://threesheetsnw.com/blog/2014/05/what-to-do-when-your-boat-catches-fire/
    http://www.soundingsonline.com/boat-shop/sea-savvy/292025-fire-on-board-heres-what-to-do
    http://www.uscgboating.org/safety/life_jacket_wear_wearing_your_life_jacket.aspx

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: survival at sea, fire, Current Events

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