Search results for: 'fires'

  • Don't Doubt the Drought

    Water Main CoverIn case you missed it, the state of California just passed a new set of water restrictions in its ongoing efforts to survive what experts are calling the second worst drought in US history. We’ve talked about the drought in this forum before. In fact, we spent a good chunk of 2014 looking at the varied effects of such a widespread dry spell—everything from gardening adjustments and grocery prices to wildfires and rattlesnakes!

     

    So, while Californians are already pulling out their lawns and keeping a wary eye out for parched pests, the San Jose Mercury News describes residents’ latest requirements:

     

    “[T]he rules adopted Tuesday:

    Watering Lawn

    • Ban all restaurants, bars and hotels from serving water unless customers ask for it.

     

    • Require all hotels and motels to provide signs in rooms telling guests that they have the option of choosing not to have towels and linens washed daily.

     

    • Ban Californians from watering lawns and landscaping with potable water within 48 hours after measurable rainfall.

     

    • Require cities, counties, water districts and private companies to limit lawn watering to two days a week if they aren't already limiting lawn and landscape watering to a certain number of days a week.”

     

    Yikes. And if no ice water at your favorite restaurant sounds drastic, it might not be drastic enough. In light of Gov. Brown’s call to cut water use by 20% in 2014, water activist Conner Everts points out, “we are failing”—the state’s water consumption went down by less than 10% last year, leading to the current restrictions. And then there’s Everts’ haunting question:

     

    “At what point do we accept that this might be the fourth year of a 10-year drought?”

     

    Water LevelsSo, while California farmers drain the last of what blogger Mark Morford calls “our ‘backup’ water” from the ground, we’ll be sending moist thoughts and rainy vibes westward. However, if you live somewhere supposedly unaffected by the drought, don’t think that you get to stop paying attention. Have you heard the adage, “When the time for decision comes, the time for preparation has passed”? In other words, if you’re not currently experiencing a drought, the time to prepare for one is now!

     

    As ever, start with good information. Check out the blog posts listed below to learn more about water purification, filtration, and (critically!) storage. Then don’t forget to browse our water products for everything from tablets and filters to barrels and pouches.

     

     

    How about you? How has your area been affected? What have you been doing to prep for or thrive during a drought?

    Posted In: Additional Reading, Disaster Scenarios, Planning, Water Storage Tagged With: California, drought, Prepare, water

  • How to Survive a Burning Ship

    How to Survive a Burning Ship

    More than 400 people were safely evacuated from a car ferry that caught fire Sunday off Greece’s Adriatic coast. Poor weather conditions made rescue difficult, but Italian and Greek helicopters and rescue teams managed to bring most of the passengers to safety. Unfortunately, there were 10 casualties.

    The boat drifted in rough seas between Italy and Greece as passengers waited to be rescued. The cause of the fire is still unknown, and attempts to tow the ship to shore ended when the tow cables broke overnight. Italian and Albanian magistrates are debating whether to continue attempting to tow the boat for investigation.

    The U.S. Coast Guard’s 2011 Recreational Boating Statistics Report listed 218 boating accidents that year involving a fire or explosion. Though there were losses in the ferry fire, passengers and rescuers worked together to bring most of the passengers safely to shore.

    The problem with boat fires is that you cannot simply run across the street to escape it; the only way to escape a boat fire is to await rescue or go overboard, which can be nearly as dangerous.

     

    HOW TO SURVIVE A BURNING SHIP

    Plan Ahead

    Thinking ahead of the best way to respond to a boat fire increases the probability you’ll remain calm and react correctly should one break out. Boat fires can go from smoke to inferno in minutes, so every moment counts. If possible, test safety equipment ahead of time to ensure you will know how to use it in the heat of the moment.

    Wear a Life Jacket

    First and foremost, put on a life jacket in case you do need to go (or accidentally go) overboard. Life jackets are designed to keep your head above water and in a position that helps you breathe when in the water. Keep in mind that adult-sized life jackets are not suitable for children. A life jacket should fit snugly and won’t allow the child’s chin or ears to slip through.

    Locate an Escape Route

    If the boat is docked, escape is simple. You can even bypass the life jackets and just get off the boat. In this case, call the firefighters to handle the fire for you; professionals are always a good bet.

    If the boat is at sea or in other deep waters when fire breaks out, escape can be more challenging—and, of course, the bigger the boat, the more complex your route can be. Every time you step foot on a large boat, like a ferry or cruiseliner, take note of the emergency plan (which should be posted in a public area of a ferry, as well as posted in your state room on a cruise ship), and pay attention during the “boring” emergency practice drill you’re required to attend on a cruise.

    Attempt to Extinguish the Flames

    If a fire extinguisher is handy, aim it at the base of the flames and discharge it, using a back and forth sweeping motion. Remember P.A.S.S:
    • Pull pin,
    • Aim at base of fire
    • Squeeze handle
    • Sweep side to side
    Never use water on an electric, gasoline, grease, or oil fire. Fifty-five percent of boat fires are caused by wiring and appliance malfunctions. Be sure that the fire extinguisher you are using is appropriate for the type of fire you’re facing. If the fire cannot be contained, the boat will be lost.

    Watch this video on methods for fighting various boat fires:

    Move Away from the Fire

    If the fire is uncontainable, move away from it, closing doors and hatches behind you, and move windward if possible. At this point, you’ll need to decide whether to wait for rescue or abandon ship.

    Bear in mind that the smoke and chemicals released in the fire can be more dangerous than the fire itself.

    Abandon Ship, if Necessary

    If possible, enter the life raft directly from the boat; avoid swimming to reach the raft. Bring a radio distress beacon on board the raft along with emergency supplies, such as important medication, water, a Swiss army knife, a whistle, a flashlight and a first-aid kit (many life rafts and escape boats will already be equipped with these supplies; that’s the kind of information you’ll want to know in advance). If you are traveling in foreign waters, bring travel documents as well.

    Once on board the raft, get to a safe distance from the burning boat. Try to stay dry and stay warm by huddling with other raft passengers. If there is no supply of drinking water on the raft or escape boat, arrange to collect rainwater and ration it to a maximum of half a quart per person per day.

    Preparedness is Key

    The more you are prepared for a boat fire when traveling by sea, the more likely you’ll able to handle it calmly, should it happen. More than 400 passengers aboard the car ferry did the right thing in a tough situation and lived to tell about it.

    Sources
    http://www.boatus.com/seaworthy/fire/
    http://www.nordhavn.com/resources/tech/boat_fires.php
    http://www.boat-ed.com/pennsylvania/studyGuide/Preventing-Fires-and-What-to-Do-if-Fire-Erupts-on-Your-Boat/101039_101039194
    http://threesheetsnw.com/blog/2014/05/what-to-do-when-your-boat-catches-fire/
    http://www.soundingsonline.com/boat-shop/sea-savvy/292025-fire-on-board-heres-what-to-do
    http://www.uscgboating.org/safety/life_jacket_wear_wearing_your_life_jacket.aspx

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: survival at sea, fire, Current Events

  • California Rainstorms Bring Flooding, Mudslides

    California Rainstorms Bring Flooding, Mudslides

    It’s been a tough water year for California. We’ve talked about the drought pretty extensively here on the blog, as well as some surprising effects it has had, like increasing rattlesnake populations in residential areas—in addition to the expected effects, like increasing food costs, more frequent and damaging wildfires (see here and here), and skyrocketing prices at water auctions.

    California started getting much-needed water last week, but it’s coming in a series of downpours that have flooded streets, caused mudslides that overtook homes and stranded motorists on the Pacific Coast Highway (a portion of the PCH is even shut down completely for 3-4 weeks because of the damage), and temporarily cut power to around 100,000 customers in the Bay Area. There was even a small tornado in south L.A. that blew the roof off one home.

    Just this month (1st-15th) it has rained 9.14 inches in San Francisco—compared to 2.08 inches that fell in almost six months last year (July 1 to Dec 15th). The ground just can’t absorb the water at the rate it’s falling, which leads to the mudslides and severe flooding that happened this week. Evacuations have taken place in several Southern California communities, and more will happen if the rain continues at these rates.

    A heavy storm is expected to come into Southern California Tuesday afternoon, leading to concern over more possible mudslides and flood damage. Northern California can expect rain and snow until Wednesday.

    Many California residents are unprepared for power outages, evacuations, and flooding—while others are ready, having prepared in advance for just these types of emergencies, with survival kits, family evacuation plans, and emergency gear they can rely on during the storms.

    Instagram user @annettecardwell posted this photo on December 10th with the caption “House is sand bagged, hatches are battened, fireplace is roaring. Ready for #hellastorm”

     

     

    House is sand bagged, hatches are battened, fireplace is roaring. Ready for #hellastorm

     

    A photo posted by Annette Cardwell (@annettecardwell) on

    Google brought their sense of humor—and a raft—along for the ride… because you never know.

    Twitter user @dwnydaisy seemed all set to go the day the storms hit.

    Unfortunately, there were also a lot of messages like this one from Twitter user @krisellelaran, who thinks Californians aren’t well prepared.

    Some California residents even had to evacuate because the storm downed power lines onto their homes.

    Being prepared doesn't always mean you get to stay home, or that there isn't damage to your property, but it does mean there’s less to worry about in a crisis.

    To prepare for heavy storms that cause power outages and evacuations:

    • Get an emergency kit for everyone in your household.
    • Buy or build a power outage kit for your home—you’ll appreciate having it during short outages where you get to stay home, as well as serious storms that require evacuation.
    • Develop a household or family emergency and evacuation plan.
    • Build up a supply of food storage and water storage you can rely on in long-term emergencies as well as short-term crises that last just a few days or weeks.
    • Research and develop important skills you can rely on for communication or survival.

    Prepare in advance, and you'll be ready for the next #rainpocalyspe or #hellastorm that comes your way.

    --Sarah

     

    Sources:

    http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/waterlogged-northern-california-rain-27626164

    http://www.foxnews.com/weather/2014/12/13/pineapple-express-storm-system-pounds-california/

    http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-first-storm-of-three-southern-california-20141216-story.html

    http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-portion-of-pch-to-be-closed-20141215-story.html

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: Preparedness In The News, rainstorm, Current Events, flood

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