Catalog Request

Search results for: 'earthquakes'

  • Second Tornado Season: Autumn Tornado Rips Through the South

    Winter has arrived in many places the country, but for some Southern states, warmer weather mixed with powerful storms brought destruction and death. In Alabama, a tornado killed at least three people Wednesday morning, according to NBC News, with two more later confirmed dead in Tennessee. One of the reasons this tornado may have been so disastrous is because it happened in the early hours of the day while people were still sleeping.

    Rain and high winds continued on Wednesday, with a tornado watch that lasted until noon local time.

    Tornado season lasts through July, but according to Weather.com, autumn is an unofficial “second” tornado season. This second season begins in the latter half of October and lasts all the way through November. Throughout October and November, severe thunderstorms are more likely to occur. As such, tornadoes are also more likely.

    The severe storms and tornado that hit the South occurred on November 30, the last day of the second tornado season.

    november-tornadoes-via-weather second tornado seasonTornadoes can happen in most states in November (see map). The most active outbreak during second tornado season was in November, 1992. 105 tornadoes struck in 13 different states from Texas through to the Carolinas. 26 people were killed and 638 people were injured during this three-day outbreak.

    Because it’s not as common to see tornadoes after July, complacency is an issue that can affect anyone. However, as we’ve seen in this case, tornadoes can and do happen throughout the year, even when we least expect them.

    Being prepared for tornadoes year round is an important part of preparedness. And it’s not just tornadoes. Earthquakes can strike without warning, day or night. Hurricanes can come before or after the season officially ends. Wild fires can blow up any time of the year. Many disasters won’t give advanced warning, so make sure you have everything you need while the skies are clear.

     

    Disaster_Blog_Banner Second tornado season

  • Natural Disaster Seasons are Scheduled Year-Round

    When isn’t there a warning of some imminent natural disaster? It seems like some sort of devastation or disaster is scheduled each month, ready to knock us off our feet. Knowing when each disaster is more likely to strike can help us be better prepared, and with better preparedness comes greater safety.

    The following is a list of natural disasters the United States can expect on a yearly basis, along with applicable dates in which they are “scheduled.”

     

    Tornado season disaster seasonTornado Season: March – July

    Technically, tornado season differs for various regions. For example, the Southern States are in peak tornado season from March to May, whereas the Northern Plains and Midwest experience their tornado season around June and July. Of course, it’s important to keep in mind that tornadoes can occur during any time and any month.

    To learn more about tornadoes, click here.

     

    Hurricane season disaster seasonHurricane Season: June – November

    Half the year is taken up with the Atlantic hurricane season, beginning June 1 and continuing through November 30, according to NOAA. Just like any of these scheduled disasters, some may arrive earlier than June or even after hurricane season has long since ended.

    To learn more about hurricanes, click here.

     

    Fire Season: October – January

    Fire Approaching House (NY Times) disaster season fire seasonFire season is a fickle thing. It depends on outside factors, such as recent precipitation and heat. But, October is generally the start of fire season and, depending on which part of the country you reside, could last through January.

    California, while still following these same guidelines, tends to be in the danger zone year round. “Where there’s drought, there’s fire,” says Slate. California has been in a state of drought for many years, making fires a likely threat.

     

    Earthquake Season: January – December

    Christchurch, New Zealand - March 12, 2011 disaster season earthquake season

    If you thought you had at least February off from any imminent disaster, this will come as bad news. Earthquakes happen every month of the year, in every state, and can happen at any time of the day or night. As of yet, earthquakes are unable to be predicted.

     

    There is no day or month that is immune from natural disasters. Because of this, being constantly prepared is vital. Sure, some natural disasters can be better predicted during certain seasons, making it easier to prepare, but remember, these disaster seasons aren’t always followed exactly. Hurricanes can come before or after hurricane season, tornadoes can form outside of tornado season, and fires can certainly happen year round. Also, there are other disasters, such as earthquakes, that simply can’t be predicted. Combined with blizzards and severe thunderstorms, there’s a full year of scheduled disasters waiting to strike.

    Fortunately, getting the basics can be quick and easy. Make sure you have what you need before disaster strikes. Prepare today for tomorrow’s emergencies.

     

    Disaster_Blog_Banner disaster season

  • Mountain House Review (Part 2): Stroganoff, Teriyaki, and Noodles and Chicken

    mh-classic-bucket Mountain House ReviewWhat’s an emergency? Most of us think of natural disasters: hurricanes, floods, earthquakes.

    But what about when mom is sick and dad isn’t around and five kids ages 3 to 13, most of whom have various dietary restrictions, need to be fed?

    That happened this week. Fortunately, during the last two weeks we’ve been trying meal pouches from the Mountain House® Classic Assortment (SKU: FC B395). The bucket contains 12 pouches of six different meals. Two pouches of Beef Stroganoff to the rescue.

     

    Beef Stroganoff

    “What’s Beef Stroganoff?” one of my children asked.

    “It’s ground beef and noodles,” I replied.

    beef-stroganoff Mountain House ReviewNotice I neglected to mention the traditional mushrooms and sour cream. I didn’t want them to run away from the table, screaming, before they’d tried it. Some of my children are incredibly picky. I have an autistic, 5-year-old son who, until last year, ate fewer than 10 foods. I also have a special needs 11-year-old who, at nearly every dinner, informs me that she’s “allergic” to everything on the table.

    She was the only one who didn’t try the Beef Stroganoff. Everyone else liked it. Though the rehydrated mushrooms were large enough to be obvious, they apparently looked enough like ground beef to fool the children. I later caught my 5-year-old sitting on the table next to the serving bowl, shoving stroganoff into his mouth with both hands.

    We liked the sauce’s flavor, probably because it was more cream-of-mushroom soup than sour cream. The mushrooms were not the least bit rubbery, which, frankly, surprised me considering their dehydrated-rehydrated status.

    However, the best part of the meal for me was its ease and speed. I’d been sick all day and wasn’t up to cooking. Two packets of Beef Stroganoff and a salad made a quick, healthy, tasty dinner that cost less than a trip to a fast food restaurant.

     

    Noodles and Chicken

    noodles-and-chicken Mountain House ReviewAn advantage of variety buckets like this one is that it allows family members to realize they actually enjoy food they normally wouldn’t try. My 9-year-old fruit hater discovered she loved the Granola with Blueberries and Milk. My 3-year-old little carnivore learned that the noodles in the Lasagna were as good as the meat. (You can find my review of those products here.)

    Occasionally, however, it means running across a food that one person loves but the rest don’t.

    I thought the Noodles and Chicken tasted great. The noodles were tender but not soggy, the chicken was flavorful and the sauce was thick and spiced perfectly.

    However, a few months ago, my children simultaneously decided they didn’t like chicken. (I wish they’d made that decision before I bought the 40-pound box of frozen chicken breasts, rather than after.)

    My 3-year-old was the only one who ate more than a bite. She asked for seconds. The rest asked for hot dogs.

    Food storage does no good if no one likes it. The nice thing about this Classic Meal Assortment bucket, and other food storage buckets, is it allows you to try many different entrées. Then, when you see what family members like, you can buy pouches or larger cans of their favorites. You’re not wasting food or money.

     

    Chicken Teriyaki with Rice

    chicken-teriyaki mountain house reviewI’ve discovered one way to get my kids to (occasionally) eat chicken: put it in Chinese-style recipes. I served one of the two Chicken Teriyaki with Rice pouches according to the package instructions. I made stuffed egg rolls using the other pouch. The children who didn’t like chicken ate the egg rolls, and the ones who didn’t like egg rolls ate the Chicken Teriyaki with rice. Success.

     

    Stuffed Chicken Teriyaki Egg Rolls

    Ingredients:

    1 package coleslaw mix

    OR

    3 cups shredded cabbage and

    ¼ cup grated carrot

    2 Tablespoons soy sauce

    2 Tablespoons water

    2 teaspoons ground ginger

    2 teaspoons garlic powder

    1/8-1/4 teaspoon Chinese 5-spice powder (you can get many varieties in supermarket spice sections, but the best is in Asian stores)

    Green onion to taste (optional)

    One pouch Mountain House Freeze Dried Teriyaki Chicken with Rice, prepared

    One package egg roll wrappers (You can find them in the produce section of grocery stores)

    Cooking oil spray

     

    Directions

    Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Spray a cookie sheet with cooking oil spray.

    In a large saucepan or wok, sauté coleslaw mix or cabbage and carrots, and green onion, with 2 Tablespoons soy sauce and 2 Tablespoons water. Add ginger, garlic powder and Chinese 5-spice powder.

    Add Mountain House Freeze Dried Teriyaki Chicken with Rice, stirring to prevent burning. Remove pan from heat.

    Put about ¼-1/3 cup mixture into each egg roll wrapper. Roll according to directions on package. Place on cookie sheet.

    Spray the tops of egg rolls with cooking oil spray and cook for 10-15 minutes, turning halfway through, until lightly browned.

    Makes 12-18.

     

    Blog Image mountain house review

1-3 of 98

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
  6. ...
  7. 33
Back to Top