Search results for: 'earthquakes'

  • City of Tents - Living After the Nepal Earthquake

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    TweetSaturday saw a major earthquake in Nepal. The 7.8 magnitude earthquake has left a death toll of over 4,000. Entire towns have been flattened. With multiple aftershocks still shaking the area, along with landslide in the steep mountain, thousands are still anxious about their safety.

    On the first night following the Nepal earthquake, thousands of people were left on the street without shelter. IN the days since, tent cities are starting to take shape, springing up all over the region, providing at least some form of shelter for those without—shelter that may have to last for weeks, even months. And with aftershocks still rolling, people are staying outdoors in tents to avoid the danger of another collapse. BBC News reported on the scene at Kathmandu:

     

    Tent City Associated Press

    “Vast tent cities have sprung up in Nepal's capital, Kathmandu, for those displaced or afraid to return to their homes as strong aftershocks continued. Thousands spent Sunday night - their second night - outside.”

     

    As we’ve seen in Kathmandu, tents are the go-to for those in the affected areas. And with such wide-spread devastation, how long will they have to remain in these tent cities? Which begs the question, if an earthquake struck your area, would you be prepared with shelter for you and your family?

    Just over a week ago, we at Emergency Essentials participated in The Great Utah Shakeout – an event designed to help people prepare for an earthquake. We set up a shakeout camp which consisted of a variety of tents—from tiny two-man pop-ups, to our premium Barebones cabin tents, to our 450 sq. ft Geo Shelter dome tent, all outfitted with the gear that will help people survive comfortably following a large quake. Those who stopped by our camp enjoyed strolling about our little camp (even though 6 inches of snow was on the ground in the morning hours, followed by 40 MPH winds in the afternoon…an appropriate touch Mother Nature provided to help us illustrate survival in trying conditions). I’ll tell you what, I was definitely grateful we had those tents set up, because it was a chilly day.

    The Barebones tent not only demonstrated the ability withstand all types of conditions, including heavy snowfall and strong winds, but was outfitted with cots, a desk, and even a wood burning stove. The Barebones Safari Outfitter Tent can comfortably house up to four people, and through several seasons if necessary. Take a look!

    Barebones

    Barebones Pano

    IMG_4152IMG_4151

     

    If I were in Kathmandu and forced to find a place to live for an indefinite amount of time, this would be right at the top of my list. And, with some alternate energy sources like a Goal Zero Yeti 1250 or some solar panels to provide light and power, this would definitely take some of the pain out of the disaster.

    The Nepal earthquake shows us how important shelter can be. Fortunately they’ve had some nice nights, but earthquakes don’t always wait for good weather, as our weather on ShakeOut day demonstrated.

    So, are you prepared with shelter? We hope so. But if not, check out our Barebones tents so when disaster does strike, you’ll have the shelter you need to protect you and your family.

     

    Barebones Outfitter Safari Tent: http://beprepared.com/barebones-safari-outfitter-tent.html

    Barebones Little Bighorn Tent: http://beprepared.com/barebones-little-bighorn-tent.html

    Shake Out Camp Blog Post: http://beprepared.com/blog/17966/shakeout-camp-surviving-well/

    Posted In: Uncategorized

  • Are You Ready?

    Are You Ready ?

     

    Are you ready? Have you already prepared for the storms, floods, fires, or earthquakes that may be coming your way? And what about the personal set-backs that strike closer to home; are you ready for a job loss, an injury, or an illness that could shake your ability to take care of your family?

    The future can be a scary thing, unless you’re ready for the hardships it can bring. Being “crisis-ready” brings peace of mind in good times while making the tough times easier. With emergency kits packed and ready to go, an ample food supply in store, and evacuation plans made, even the aftermath of a disaster will include good meals, shelter, warmth, light, and security…everything you need to be safe and happy with your family.

    And if your catastrophe is more personal, like a lay-off, divorce, or long-term illness, you can still find comfort knowing all will be well while you ride out the storm.

    So, are you ready for whatever comes your way? We are, and we’re standing by, ready to help you.

    Posted In: Uncategorized

  • Can Animals Predict Earthquakes?

    When it comes to natural disasters, early warning systems are literal lifesavers. That’s why seismologists and earthquake engineers have spent decades trying to identify early predictors of earthquakes—without much luck, unfortunately. But while seismographic technology gets fancier and more expensive, one group of researchers is taking a different tack.

     

    Multicoloured cute kitty in karate style jump positionFolk wisdom has long held that animals exhibit unusual behavior prior to an earthquake. The US Geological Survey helpfully reminds us that animals do weird things for lots of unexplained reasons (why, for example, does the neighbor’s cat single me out for cuddles when I’m the only allergic person in the room?). A newly published study documents just such unusual behavior in Peru’s Yanachaga National Park the week before a magnitude 7.0 earthquake. Evidence of this unusual behavior came through the park's motion triggered cameras:

     

    "[It was] determined that the park's cameras traditionally see between five and 15 animals in one day. However, a whole week before the earthquake struck, that number dramatically dropped, with five or fewer animals spotted by any one camera five to seven days before the quake."

     

    Unusual indeed.

     

    The science seems sound: pressure built up before an earthquake sends an electric charge through layers of rock, which is released into the air at the surface, causing the ionization of air molecules. Ionization can affect serotonin levels in mammals, and while a little serotonin feels pretty good (that’s the chemical in our brain that contributes to feelings of happiness and relaxation), too much serotonin can have the opposite affect. Researchers hypothesize that animals suffering from nausea or restlessness associated with too much serotonin in an earthquake prone area will move to a place with less charged air—which is exactly what happened on camera in Peru.

     

    All this is fantastically exciting when it comes to earthquake prediction, but it’s not exactly practical information yet. Unless you have a convenient way to monitor your dog’s serotonin levels, you might be better off focusing on preparedness, rather than prediction—especially if you live in an area prone to earthquakes. Here are a few ways we can use our resources to plan ahead for the Big One.

     

    Have a plan. As with any disaster, the most crucial tool in our toolbox is a plan. Know the safest place to hunker down in your house. Know how to contact family members at work or school. Know where you’ll all meet when it’s over. And make sure kids practice the plan until it’s second nature.

     

    Get gear. We all know we need to have an emergency kit. If you live in earthquake country, there may be more specific items you should have handy. Consider storing things like heavy-duty work gloves and boots, dust masks, and insurance information. It’s also smart to keep shoes and a flashlight by every bed, in the event of a nighttime tremor.

     

    Secure your space. Many of the injuries sustained during an earthquake are not from collapsing structures, but from broken glass and falling objects. Heavy furniture—and especially top-heavy pieces—should be bolted to walls; items on bookshelves can be stabilized with putty; and heavy wall art or mirrors or shelves should never hang over beds and couches. Additionally, know how to shut off gas and water, and make sure any structural cracks or leaks are repaired.

     

    Be your own best resource. No early warning system is as reliable as good, old-fashioned know-how. Become an expert in earthquake protocols. Learn CPR. Head up a community response team. Practice earthquake drills. And read up on engineering codes for your area to make sure your family and neighborhood are safe.

     

    Have you experienced an earthquake? What are your best tips for earthquake prep?

     

     

     

    References:

     

    http://www.natureworldnews.com/articles/13766/20150330/animals-still-best-earthquake-warning-system-weve.htm

     

    http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/007272.htm

     

    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682609001837

     

    https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/emergencypreparedness/guides/earthquakes.html

     

    http://earthquake.usgs.gov/learn/topics/megaqk_facts_fantasy.php

     

    http://earthquakecountry.org/sevensteps/

     

    http://www.ready.gov/earthquakes

     

    http://www.redcross.org/prepare/disaster/earthquake

    Posted In: Disaster Scenarios, Emergency Kits, Planning Tagged With: predict, Prepare, Earthquake, animals

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