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  • Natural Disaster Seasons are Scheduled Year-Round

    When isn’t there a warning of some imminent natural disaster? It seems like some sort of devastation or disaster is scheduled each month, ready to knock us off our feet. Knowing when each disaster is more likely to strike can help us be better prepared, and with better preparedness comes greater safety.

    The following is a list of natural disasters the United States can expect on a yearly basis, along with applicable dates in which they are “scheduled.”

     

    Tornado season disaster seasonTornado Season: March – July

    Technically, tornado season differs for various regions. For example, the Southern States are in peak tornado season from March to May, whereas the Northern Plains and Midwest experience their tornado season around June and July. Of course, it’s important to keep in mind that tornadoes can occur during any time and any month.

    To learn more about tornadoes, click here.

     

    Hurricane season disaster seasonHurricane Season: June – November

    Half the year is taken up with the Atlantic hurricane season, beginning June 1 and continuing through November 30, according to NOAA. Just like any of these scheduled disasters, some may arrive earlier than June or even after hurricane season has long since ended.

    To learn more about hurricanes, click here.

     

    Fire Season: October – January

    Fire Approaching House (NY Times) disaster season fire seasonFire season is a fickle thing. It depends on outside factors, such as recent precipitation and heat. But, October is generally the start of fire season and, depending on which part of the country you reside, could last through January.

    California, while still following these same guidelines, tends to be in the danger zone year round. “Where there’s drought, there’s fire,” says Slate. California has been in a state of drought for many years, making fires a likely threat.

     

    Earthquake Season: January – December

    Christchurch, New Zealand - March 12, 2011 disaster season earthquake season

    If you thought you had at least February off from any imminent disaster, this will come as bad news. Earthquakes happen every month of the year, in every state, and can happen at any time of the day or night. As of yet, earthquakes are unable to be predicted.

     

    There is no day or month that is immune from natural disasters. Because of this, being constantly prepared is vital. Sure, some natural disasters can be better predicted during certain seasons, making it easier to prepare, but remember, these disaster seasons aren’t always followed exactly. Hurricanes can come before or after hurricane season, tornadoes can form outside of tornado season, and fires can certainly happen year round. Also, there are other disasters, such as earthquakes, that simply can’t be predicted. Combined with blizzards and severe thunderstorms, there’s a full year of scheduled disasters waiting to strike.

    Fortunately, getting the basics can be quick and easy. Make sure you have what you need before disaster strikes. Prepare today for tomorrow’s emergencies.

     

    Disaster_Blog_Banner disaster season

  • Lingering Drought (and Not Just in California)

    Step aside, California; you’re not the only one dealing with drought in this country.

    The entire state of Alabama is under some sort of drought condition, ranging from abnormally dry to exceptional drought. The last time the whole of Alabama faced drought conditions was back in 2011.

    nj-drought-monitor-comparison Lingering DroughtBut it’s not just Alabama. New Jersey is also drying up, and dry weather looks to be on the docket for a while yet. While not as bad as Alabama or California (can anywhere be as bad as California?), severe drought is creeping in along the Northeast. Lack of rain and snow in 2016 is a large factor in these drought conditions.

    While Georgia isn’t completely parched, it is quite dry in many areas. In fact, at the beginning of the 2016 calendar year, there wasn’t even a trace of moderate drought. Now there’s plenty of moderate, severe, extreme, and even exceptional drought conditions.

    But wait! There’s more! Mississippi is also suffering. A handful of counties are afflicted with extreme drought, while the majority is facing moderate to severe drought. About a third of the state is “just” abnormally dry. Only two counties are unaffected by drought conditions. In all, Georgia’s farmers are really starting to feel it.

    Of course, California isn’t doing so great, either.

    As a nation, there are a lot of parched states. IN fact, there are only a select few that don’t have any drought conditions at all. That being said, there are still plenty of areas that are receiving plenty of water, despite their state having some form of dryness. So all is not lost!

    us-drought-monitor-as-of-october-11-2016 Lingering DroughtHowever, the U.S. Drought Monitor shows that certain areas are more affected than others. Take a look at the map here and see if you live in one of those areas. If you do, now is the perfect time to start preparing your water storage. Invest in a water barrel (or two) and fill them before you’re on a water restriction. This is one way to ensure you have enough water before any restrictions are put into place. And this water is not just for drinking, but washing and cleaning as well.

    Drought can happen in any state, and if you are fortunate to not be affected by it at this time, take precautions now so that when the drought does come to your neighborhood, you’ll be ready.

     

    Disaster_Blog_Banner Lingering Drought

  • Hurricane Hermine Strikes Florida Following a Decade-Long Drought

    Hurricane Hermine Flood Hurricane Hermine - via BBC

    It happened. After a decade of relative calm, Florida was hit by a hurricane.

    Despite only being classified as a Category 1, Hurricane Hermine did some big damage, cutting off power for over 250,000 people in Florida. Despite the widespread power loss, NBC reported nothing was life threatening as far as damage was concerned.

    Flooding in Florida has turned the roads into dangers. One region received more than 9 inches of rain from Tuesday before Hermine even made landfall. After Hurricane Hermine has since weakened into a tropical storm, but major flooding – including flash floods and river floods – threaten parts of Georgia and the Carolinas.

     

     

    Even though Hurricane Hermine has been downgraded into a tropical storm, it’s still dangerous with maximum sustained winds of 60 miles per hour. CNN thinks it could even stall off the East Coast for days once it passes the Carolinas.

    According to Rick Knabb, hurricane center Director, “the most frequent cause of life…is from inland flooding due to heavy rainfall.” So just because there is no longer a hurricane doesn’t mean the threat is over. Be aware of the watches and warnings issued for your region. And if there is flooding, stay away. “Turn around, don’t drown” is NOAA’s slogan when it comes to floods. Remember, even just 6 inches of moving water can knock an adult off his feet, and 12 inches can carry away a car.

    Hurricane Hermine is expected to continue travelling up the coast and should reach Boston by Monday, if it makes it that far. This will increase the flood risk of all coastal states due to rain and storm surges. If you live along that route, make sure you have the necessary gear and supplies in case you need to weather the storm. If you’re not in that area, then now’s a great time to prepare for another disaster that could come your way without warning.

     

    Hurricane_Blog_Banner hurricane hermine

    Learn all about hurricanes here: Everything You Need to Know About Hurricanes

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