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  • Mountain House: Nearly 50 Years of Freeze-Dried Excellence

    We strive to bring you emergency food that will stand the tests of time, in quality, taste, and health. So when we were looking for a company to partner with, these high standards played a key role in our selection of Mountain House as our freeze-dried food partner.

     

    A Lasting Legacy

    Mountain House has been creating delicious freeze-dried meals for nearly 50 years. This legacy of excellence began during the Vietnam War when the United States military requested better tasting, longer lasting, and lighter food than the K and C rations they were currently using. Mountain House (known as Oregon Freeze Dry at the time) was awarded the opportunity to be the military’s supplier, and has been ever since. For more details on how they came into being, check out their video below.

     

     

    Proven Quality

    Creating freeze-dried food for almost half a century means Mountain House has been around long enough to actually test their 25-year-old food that has aged in real-time, as opposed to accelerated lab tests done by other companies. This makes their claim of their food having up to a 25 year shelf-life a proven fact. But what about food older than 25 years, you ask? According to Mountain House, it’s still good! The flavor might change a little bit, but it will still be safe to eat.

    There’s more that goes with this proven shelf life, however. Mountain House has what they call a “Taste Guarantee,” meaning if your food doesn’t taste as good as it would have the day it was packed by 25 years, they will replace your food for you, no questions asked. That’s a confidence that can only come from decades of quality production.

     

    3rd Party Testing

    Mountain House doesn’t just believe you will love their food; they know you will. By taking advantage of third-party testers, Mountain House has evidence to back up their claims that people really do prefer their food over that of other brands. With our quest for the best in freeze-dried food, it’s little wonder we’re the largest suppliers of Mountain House around. We carry every Mountain House product they produce, and sell them at the lowest prices anywhere!

     

    Mountain House Overall Liking Summary for Chili Mac via Oregon State University Mountain House Overall Liking Summary for Chili Mac via Oregon State University

     

    Mountain House has Variety

    Emergency food doesn’t just have to be for storing and never eating. Mountain House expects you to eat their food, whether in an emergency, while hiking or camping, or just as an easy-to-fix dinnertime meal. They want you to enjoy their recipes, and they’ve provided you with many options to do just that.

     

    Mountain House Chili Mac Mountain House Chili Mac

    Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, and Meats

    Mountain House has a plethora of meal options from breakfast dishes, lunch and dinner entrees, and meats. From scrambled eggs and breakfast skillets for breakfast to chili mac and beef stew for lunch and dinner, your options for meals stay as fresh as the food itself. With cans of meat – such as chicken or beef – you can add extra bulk to your meals or use them in your own recipes.

    These freeze-dried entrées are prepared by professional chefs and are then freeze-dried so when they are reconstituted they revert back to the ready-to-serve meal they started out as. Boring and tasteless camping and emergency food is a thing of the past. Mountain House gives you the power to eat what you want, wherever you are.

    You can find every Mountain House option by clicking here.

     

    Sides and Desserts

    A meal just isn’t complete without a side and dessert. Sides help round out your meals with vegetables and fruit, and Mountain House’s delicious desserts really are the cherry on top. Choose from raspberry crumble or freeze-dried ice cream (just to name a few) to really turn your outdoor or emergency meals into something special.

    Mountain House Raspberry Crumble Mountain House Raspberry Crumble

    Buckets and Kits

    The Mountain House buckets and emergency meal kits are easy to carry and easy to store. Depending on the bucket, you get either 12 or 16 Mountain House food pouches. As for kits, you can combine various kits to create multiple combinations of meal options. For example, the 2-Day case of emergency food has different food options than the 5-Day Emergency Food Supply, and the 3-day is different from the 4-Day, as well as the others. So when it comes to having a variety of meals, mix it up with these Just-In-Case Emergency Food Supplies. Combine the 5-Day case with a 2-Day case for 7 days of Mountain House meals. Combine others for even more days’ worth of food! It’s up to you how you mix it up, but you can guarantee a varied supply of your favorite meals.

     

    Pouches

    Mountain House Breakfast SkilletEach pouch has approximately 2.5 servings full of delicious Mountain House food. One of the perks of pouches is their small, personal-sized contents. If you’re out on a campout, you may not want to haul around a #10 can of your favorite entrée. Pouches allow you to pack your food in convenience. The pouches can also be used to reconstitute the contents without even having pour it into a separate container. This makes it so you don’t have to carry plates around, either. When it comes to quality and convenience, these Mountain House pouches definitely deliver.

     

    After all is said and done, however, the most important thing about Mountain House meals is whether or not you like them. Of course, their track record in creating mouth-watering meals is above expectation, so we’re confident you’ll love them, too.

    Throughout the entire month of March, we’re throwing out all the stops to give you some of the best deals ever on all things Mountain House. Visit our Mountain House page by clicking here and take advantage of some great deals on amazing freeze-dried food!

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  • 4 Things Everyone Should Do to Prepare for an Economic Recession

    Some economists are suggesting an economic slowdown is imminent. Others say the next one is probably a while away. Either way, it’s wise to prepare financially now for what’s to come.

    “The key to keep in mind is that anything can happen. Therefore, always prepare for any possible emergency,” said Kaylee Chen, a peer mentor at the University of Utah Personal Money Management Center, in an e-mail.

    Chen recommended four steps to prepare for an economic downturn: Have a savings, have necessities like food storage, learn a new skill and mentally prepare.

    Budgeting for the Recession Start saving now for the next recession.

    First, have or start a savings.

    Peter Dunn, a financial columnist for USA Today, suggested that more people have been saving since the 2008-2009 recession because they’re thinking about it. Chen said she hadn’t necessarily been seeing that.

    “People are definitely more aware of the idea of saving. However, following through and acting on it is a different situation,” she said. “I find a lot of people are still spending.”

    She suggested budgeting based on the 50/30/20 rule. Fifty percent of income should go to fixed expenses. These are expenses like a house payment and utility bills that must be paid.

    Thirty percent of income should go to discretionary expenses. These are more flexible expenses like groceries, gas, and entertainment that can be adjusted.

    Twenty percent of income should go toward investing or financial goals and saving for emergencies. Chen recommended women put 12 percent of their salary in long-term investments and men 10 percent.

    “The reality is that women live longer and make less income than men,” she said.

    She recommended people talk with a financial planner yearly.

    “They will work with you to plan for children’s college, travel, or retirement,” she said.

    The important thing is to start saving.

    “Even as small as setting five dollars aside, it’s still a start,” she said.

    Homemade Year Supply - Recession Food might be hard to come by during a recession. Prepare while you can by obtaining an emergency food supply.

    Second, keep some necessities like food storage.

    In any emergency, whether it be short-term or long-term, it’s important to recognize nobody can do everything by themselves. Therefore, one of the necessities to build is a list of resources. These can include a church or non-profit organization. It’s also useful to network to develop a list of where to go for extra help in case of job loss or other emergency.

    A column making the rounds online that was said to have been written by a man who survived Hurricane Sandy pointed out that networking is useful for many aspects of emergency preparation.

    “Quote, ‘A man with a chainsaw and knows how to use it is a thing of beauty.’”

    Learn camping skills -  RecessionThird, Learn new skills. Like chainsaw wielding.

    These can translate into side jobs for additional income. Chen used the example of a piano teacher. Secondary skills can be useful when a person is younger because it helps them faster achieve their financial goals. When a person is older and around retirement, a side job can help them with retirement savings.

    Finally, mentally prepare for bad things to happen.

    One key to mental preparedness is to get out of debt. Chen encouraged a budget or lifestyle change. Dunn suggested decreasing spending by 10 to 15 percent over time.

    “You’ll tighten the budget before you are forced to tighten the budget,” he said.

    Another is to practice caution in an investment portfolio.

    “When the market goes down, many people get scared of the market and take out their money. You do not want to buy high and sell low,” Chen said.

    KiplingerStock Market - Recession, a finance education web site, pointed out that markets quickly recover. Since 1945, the site said, markets that have lost 10 to 20 percent have rebounded in just four months on average. Bear markets, with losses of 20 percent or more, have had an average recovery time of just 25 months.

    “If you’re in middle age, consider making a portfolio less aggressive,” a Kiplinger column said. “No single sector should claim more than 5% to 10% of your holdings.”

    Very few people can affect global markets. But they can take care of themselves and their families.

    “Understand that you have no control over the economic downturn,” Chen said. “Honestly, all one can do is to wait.”

    And, she added, a person can start taking these steps even during an economic downturn.

    “It’s never too late,” she said.

     

    Disaster_Blog_Banner - Recession

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  • Procrastination: A Recipe For Disaster(s)

    Why aren’t you prepared for a major emergency?

    According to a recent survey of 3,000 people, the majority claim they just keep putting off getting prepared. These people have even taken First Aid courses, so we know they’re interested and even want to be ready. Procrastination is keeping us from being prepared.

    Procrastination and emergency shelter does not mix.We all know disasters like to make an appearance when it’s least convenient for us, and when we least expect it. The recent 7.8 magnitude Nepal earthquake should be a smack back to reality. One moment life is good, the next…, well, it’s quite literally in shambles. This earthquake is just one reason we should not just be thinking about preparing, but actually doing it. And if you don’t think such a disaster can happen to you, just remember the earthquake that struck Michigan earlier this month. Michigan Governor Rick Snyder said that "It's rare for Michigan to experience earthquakes, but as we were reminded today, it does happen.”

    And if it does happen, why do we still procrastinate?

    Mike Lloyd of News 1130 thinks that starting to prepare can be a little overwhelming, and he may be right. That’s why St. John Ambulance is providing people with 15 Easy Steps to Emergency Preparedness. St. John Ambulance is trying to remind people about the basics and also other things that people tend to forget about.

     

    1. Make An Emergency Plan

    It all starts here, folks. As Ben Franklin once said, “If you fail to plan, you are planning to fail!” Does anybody ever really want to fail? And yet we plan on it – all the time – when we don’t plan ahead for disaster. Make a plan. To get you started, here are some things you should think about when planning:

    • Exits and evacuation routes
    • Family meeting place
    • Emergency contact
    • Plan for pets
    • Important documents (Social Security cards, birth certificates, insurance, photos of family members and pets, passports, health information, prescriptions, etc.).

     

    1. Emergency Kit

    This is pretty much the go-to for every disaster. Make sure you have a kit, because when disaster strikes, hospitals could very likely only be taking in those that are most seriously injured. Your emergency kit should help you survive the next three days after the disaster. But you might not even be home when the disaster hits, to the people at St. John Ambulance suggest to plan ahead for that, too.

     

    “You may be in a vehicle, so you need a kit for on the road or at work. You may have high-heeled shoes on at work – how are you going to walk? You may not get home for many days.”

     

    If you’re unsure where to start in building your emergency kit, ready.gov has some good resources to look through. Or, if you’d prefer getting a kit already packed and prepared by experts, check out our wide-range of emergency kits.

     

    1. Emergency Food and Water Storage

    We are all encouraged to be able to sustain ourselves for at least three days following a disaster. Having an emergency kit will definitely help with that, but without food and water (especially water), it’s going to be most unpleasant.

    Water storage doesn’t have to be difficult. Start by filling up 2-litre bottles from your kitchen sink and storing them out of direct sunlight. Each person should have about a gallon of water per day, so if you’re planning on using 2-litre bottles, that’s going to be about 6 bottles per person per day. If you have more room, consider investing in some water jugs, or even water barrels. These will help provide you with more water, so if you do need more than just three-days’ worth of water, you’ll be prepared. At the very least, make sure you have enough water for 72-hours. Every six to 12 months, you should get out your water storage and switch out the water so it always tastes fresh.

    Food is also fairly simple to store these days. Freeze-dried food can last up to 25 years, so if you get a can or two of your favorite meal to keep on hand, you’ll have a three-day supply of food without any hassle on your end. Best of all, freeze-dried meals are delicious and easy to prepare – just add hot water, wait about 10 minutes, and you’ve got yourself a full-on meal!

     

    Procrastination is unpreparedness.So you see, preparing for disaster doesn’t have to be hard. You can even start today by filling water containers and stashing them in your storage room. That will take about five minutes.

    Now’s the time to start preparing. Don’t wait until it’s too late. Even if nothing happens, there is peace of mind that comes in knowing that if a disaster did strike, you would be ready for it. Don't let procrastination get the best of you. Prepare today!

     

     

    What strategies have you found that help you get motivated to prepare?

     

     

    Drought Procrastination - Dont' Do It

     

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