Welcome to Emergency Essentials!

Catalog Request

christmas

  • This Christmas Season, Work Together to be Prepared

    Christmas

    Christmas is a time of giving and reaching out to others. People from all over have others on their minds as they search for the perfect gift for their family and friends. Homeless shelters see a surge in service from local community members during this time, as does other charitable giving.

    When it comes to emergency preparedness, reaching out to others is just as important. Just as you might donate your time or resources to charities, working with family, friends, and neighbors in times of disaster helps strengthen them in areas in which you yourself are strong. And, as Flora Edwards once said, “In helping others, we shall help ourselves, for whatever mood we give out completes the circle and comes back to us.”

    Think about it. A four-legged chair is much more stable than a monopod stool. By yourself, you can get by and support yourself. But, if somebody tries to push you off your stool, they will most likely succeed. If you’re sitting on a chair and someone tries to push you off, the base underneath you is much more solid and will give you a better chance at standing your ground.

    The same thing goes for emergency preparedness. Working with your neighbors, friends, and family gives you a support group in which each person brings different skills and services to the table. A neighbor with a chainsaw will be a valuable asset when the next storm blows over your trees. Also, your truck can help haul away debris from your neighbor’s home.

    When you prepare for emergencies, think about how your preparations can help others. Your emergency food supply is more than just for disasters. Maybe your neighbor just lost his job. By having some extra food on hand, you could either invite them over for a meal to help them out, or give it to them with a smile. And who knows? Maybe the next time you have your own personal disaster, your neighbor will come to your aid.

    In the spirit of Christmas, take some time and visit your neighbors. Bring them cookies or a card. Thank them for their contributions to the community. Get to know them. Then, as the new year approaches, make it a goal to become acquainted with other members of your community. Building strong relationships will not just benefit your life now, but will also help you succeed when times get tough.

     

    Christmas

  • Give the Gift of Preparedness this Christmas

    Christmas RolloverHomer Robertson was driving south on Interstate 15 in Utah when he saw a minivan cross the median, hog his side of the freeway then roll over. He stopped to help and found three children and three adults, one of whom was pregnant and hemorrhaging.  Fortunately, Robertson knew emergency first aid. He got someone to call 911, then he, a nurse and a deputy who arrived on the scene treated the family for injuries and shock until paramedics took over.

    This time of year, many of us give gifts like emergency food and gear. We can give gifts of preparedness like these. And, as Mr. Robertson did, we can give gifts of our own preparation and knowledge.

    I asked several members of my extended family about gifts of preparedness they like to give and receive.

    “I like to give things you don’t normally think about, like stuff for the car,” said sister-in-law Savannah.

    She likes to give roadside emergency kits, blankets, flashlights, water, and snacks – which she said are especially useful when kids are in the car.

    Christmas

    I got jumper cables for my car while I was in college many years ago. I’ve used them at least yearly since then, through many years and many vehicles, to jump others’ car batteries. This year, they proved handy when my own vehicle’s battery died. They were a gift that continues to give.

    A first aid kit for a vehicle is another gift that can keep giving. It’s great for minor scrapes, bumps, and pain when you’re out and about, even if you never use it for a major incident.

    Robertson said when he was helping after the minivan’s accident, a deputy arrived with a huge first aid kit. The first thing the deputy did, before he approached the scene, was put on latex gloves. He asked Robertson to help treat a woman’s bleeding wrist. Robertson didn’t have gloves.

    “I look at my hands, and he says, ‘get some gloves’ [from the deputy’s first aid kit].”

    Since then, Robertson has carried latex gloves in his own first-aid kit.

    Robertson also likes preparedness gifts that stay home, like wheat grinders and grain.

    “I’d like to get into freeze-dried food, if they knock off about $550 off the equipment,” he joked.

    My sister-in-law, Stephanie, enjoys giving less-expensive preparedness gifts.

    “I think it’s fun to give [Mylar] space blankets. I don’t know if people like getting them, but they’re fun to give,” she said.

    Christmas

    I gave my son, a Boy Scout, hand and foot warmers for his winter campouts. (If you buy a bunch, hand warmers cost less at beprepared.com than at the dollar store.)

    My brother Mark gave hand-cranked flashlights to his young children. Not only are they useful in emergencies, they’re sturdy enough for the kids to play with, he joked.

    The gift of preparedness doesn’t have to be a physical item. Robertson was able to provide first aid after the minivan accident, and on several other occasions, because he took first aid classes. Consider taking a first aid course – or paying for one for someone else – through the American Red Cross or American Heart Association.

    Learn how to perform basic car repair, like how to change a tire. Learn how to sew on buttons or hem clothes, so you can help yours and others’ clothes last longer. The gift of preparedness provides endless opportunity for self-improvement – and can save you money.

    The gift of preparedness is powerful, because it allows you to serve others long after Christmas decorations are put away. Isn’t that Christmas at its best?

     

    Disaster_Blog_Banner Christmas

    Mountain House and Filtered Water Bottles Gift Bundle Giveaway

  • Christmas Shopping for Emergencies

    It’s possible to build an emergency kit on a budget, said Maralin Hoff, nicknamed the “Earthquake Lady,” from the Division of Emergency Management in the Utah Department of Public Safety

    “We think an emergency kit is going to cost an arm and a leg. No. It’s a shoestring. It’s that easy,” she said.

    Stockings - Christmas ShoppingIf you’re looking for last-minute Christmas gifts, emergency kit supplies can make great stocking stuffers.

    “I’ve started a new tradition. Every Christmas, I give my children and grandchildren … something new to add to their emergency kit,” Hoff said at a 2010 emergency preparedness expo shown on YouTube.

    That’s how Shelly Robertson, of American Fork, Utah, built her emergency kit.

    “Really, it’s all about having a budget,” she said, adding that she asks for emergency supplies for Christmas gifts.

    At the emergency preparedness expo, Hoff showed emergency kits built almost entirely of items from dollar stores.

    Robertson found small bottles of medicines like acetaminophen and Ibuprofen, glow sticks, trash bags, hand sanitizer, and travel size toiletries at the dollar store.

    Dollar whistles are useful gifts, Hoff said. They’re louder than shouting.

    “Every [emergency] kit should have a whistle,” she said.

    Trekker II-  Christmas ShoppingRobertson looked for Christmas sales for more expensive items. For example, she found mess kits on sale at a recreation outlet store. She found many items discounted during Emergency Essentials’ Black Friday and December sales. There, she bought an emergency radio that she loves at a discount.

    “I highly recommend it,” she said. “The most expensive thing was the radio. Everything else was $5 or less.”

    Among her $5 or less purchases:

    Emergency reflective sleeping bags. She prefers them to emergency blankets because there aren’t edges to deal with.

    She also loves our New Millennium energy bars because she wants lightweight emergency food her children will eat.

    “They taste kind of like cookies,” she said.

    Hard candies: she says they’re nice for when children are sick.

    Flashlights and batteries. She puts fresh batteries in every year and uses the old ones.

    A $5 cook stove with heating tablets. She thinks that was a gift.

    “Mostly, just take a look around at what you already own, then buy a few specialty items,” she said. “There’s a lot you can pick up for very cheap, on a very limited budget. Think about what you need, and what you can substitute for it, and just go for it.”

     

    What emergency items are you getting (or hoping to get) for Christmas?

     

    Disaster_Blog_Banner - Christmas Shopping

1-3 of 17

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
  6. 6
Back to Top