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  •  Thailand Natural and Not-So-Natural Disasters

    Some parts of the world seem to experience more than their fair share of hardship. Consider typhoon and tsunami-prone Thailand, whose recent months of political unrest have heaped threats of violence on top of an already naturally precarious region.

    When news broke of the recent coup, travelers and expats were warned to expect everything from flight cancelations to a shutdown of English language news sources. At the beginning of June, CNN reported that “Normality Resumes: Curfews lifted in three Thai hot spots,” but many experts encouraged most people to prepare for any number of disaster scenarios.

    For example, Expatsblog.com noted that in the event of an Internet blackout, travelers and residents would be unable to draw cash from an ATM, and vendors could not process credit cards. An article from AsianCorrespondent.com, a specialized news outlet, passes along recommendations from foreign institutions within Thailand, reminding people to keep electronics charged, to plan on delays in travel time, and to keep in contact with their embassies.

    The US embassy even offers a program to American citizens abroad called the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP), which helps disseminate safety instructions in case of an emergency.

    And, of course, in the midst of all this uncertainty, we’re headed into tropical storm season. Predictions for the 2014 season in the Central Pacific, according to the US State Department, anticipate a normal to “above-normal” season. The same agency (and the same link) provides a useful set of protocols for travelers visiting areas like Thailand in the event of a hurricane or typhoon.

    Weather Underground gives us a nice preparedness checklist for the same situation; and our Hurricane Preparedness mini series (along with a great collection of related resources) can be found in the links at the end of our article, “How to Prepare for a Hurricane.”

    Whether the disasters we experience are natural, man-made, or both, we can be prepared to ride out the worst.

    To learn more about what’s going on in Thailand, check out the Businessweek article, “Thai Junta Ends Curfew, Puts Out Welcome Mat for Tourists.”

     

    Do you have any experiences dealing with disasters abroad?

    -Stacey

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: natural disasters, travel

  • Can you recognize the signs of a Stroke?

    Strokes are one of the leading causes of death in the United States.  Approximately 800,000 people suffer strokes each year, and almost 130,000 of those victims die. According to the experts at stroke.org, every 40 seconds, someone in the United States will have a stroke and one stroke will take a life every four minutes.

    Strokes can happen to anyone at any time regardless of age, sex or race.  In fact, 34 percent of the 130,000 stroke-related deaths reported each year are to people under the age of 65. Women will suffer about 55,000 more strokes a year than men, and African Americans are twice as likely to suffer a stroke as Caucasians.

    So would you know how to recognize the signs of a stroke?  Here’s what you should know to act F.A.S.T if someone you love (or a stranger, for that matter) experiences a stroke.

    Types of Strokes

    Ischemic strokes occur when arteries are blocked by a small blood clot or as plaque and other fatty deposits build up in the arteries.  Almost 90 percent of all strokes are ischemic

    Hemorrhagic strokes: Happen when a blood vessel in the brain breaks open and starts to leak. Hemorrhagic strokes account for just over 10 percent of all strokes.  However, hemorrhagic strokes account for more than 30 percent of all stroke-related deaths.

     

    Act F.A.S.T.

    Learning to recognize the symptoms of a stroke and getting help immediately are very important.  Over 2,000,000 brain cells die every minute during a stroke, and can quickly cause irreversible brain damage. The faster you can recognize the signs of a stroke and get treatment, the more likely any permanent damage can be reversed.  To recognize the signs of a stroke, remember the acronym F.A.S.T.

    Face drooping: Ask the person to smile. Does their face look uneven?

    Arm weakness: Ask them to raise both arms out in front of them. Does one arm drift downward?

    Speech difficulty: Ask them to repeat a simple phrase. Does their speech sound strange?

    Time to call 9-1-1: If the person shows any of these symptoms call for help fast. Call 911!

    It’s very important to learn to recognize the symptoms of a stroke and call 911 as soon as possible.  Time saves brain tissue and could even save a life.  Just remember to act F.A.S.T. Always note the time of day you recognize the first symptoms of a stroke.

    For ischemic strokes, if treatment with clot busting medication is given within the first three hours of the first symptom, long term disability can be reduced greatly.

    There are also other stroke treatments available that may help reduce the effects of the stroke.  Hemorrhagic strokes most likely will need surgical intervention to relieve the buildup of blood in the brain and to fix the leak in the blood vessels.

    -Rick

    Sources

    www.stroke.org

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: First Aid, health and wellness, health

  • Quality, innovation, and value is what you've come to expect from Emergency Essentials, which is why we’d like to introduce you to a new line of knives and tools that share our same standards from Columbia River Knife & Tool® (CRKT).

    These are no ordinary knives and tools. CRKT® products are created by world-renowned designers who took century-old designs and brought them into the 21st century with modern technology and killer design (no pun intended).

    Tested in the field by their experts and ours, these tools make great additions to your survival gear and camping supplies. And with this Special Purchase, you’ll get all the quality you need and the value you expect from Emergency Essentials.

    Check out these select knives and tools and the CRKT® designers who made them. Or click here to shop now.

    Kangee T-Hawk designed by Ryan Johnson

    Kangee T-Hawk       Ryan Johnson

    With 27 years of experience, Ryan Johnson “has spent the last decade applying modern engineering to centuries-old tool and weapon concepts.” His work has redefined the role of tomahawks in Law Enforcement and Military applications, as well as playing a vital role in the special operations community.

    Ryan is currently president and primary designer at RMJ Tactical, LLC, and lives in Chattanooga, Tennessee with his wife and three daughters. One of Ryan’s designs is the Kangee™ T-Hawk.

    To learn more about Ryan, check out CRKT’s bio.

    Lil Guppie designed by Launce Barber

    CU-K405s       Launce Barber

    Launce Barber designs new products using what he considers the most fundamental tool everybody shares—our creative minds. With a mindset like that, he continually works on improving designs with new solutions to old problems, even after the product has gone to the shelf. Launce finds it important to partner with leaders in the industry who share his same long-term vision.

    Together, he and Tom Stokes—his long-term engineering and design partner—have created a variety of products which have won numerous awards such as Best in Show (SHOT Show 2003), Most Innovative Import Design of the Year (Blade Magazine 2003), and more. Together, they are responsible for the design of the Lil Guppie.

    To learn more about Launce, check out CRKT’s bio.

     

    Elishewitz Tao Pen designed by Allen Elishewitz

    Elishewitz Tao Pen       Allen Elishewitz

    Allen Elishewitz’s versatile background as a martial arts expert, Recon Marine, and classical artist has led him to create innovative knife models, as well as luxurious pens and watches. This world-renowned custom knife maker’s work is collected by heads of state, royal families, members of elite Special Forces units, and other notable groups. Over the years, he has received numerous awards for his work.

    He works from his studio in Canyon Lake, Texas and is the inventor of the CRKT® Anubis, Pharaoh, Montu, and Horus folders, and, of course, the Elishewitz Tao Pen.

    To learn more about Allen, check out CRKT’s bio.

     

    Onion Skinner & Onion Shenanigan designed by Ken Onion

    Onion SkinnerKen OnionOnion Shenanigan Tanto

    Custom knife maker Ken Onion first learned about the custom knife industry in 1989 after spending his childhood fervently collecting any knives he could find. He designed his first knife in 1991 after begging a local knife maker to teach him how—and he’s been designing ever since.

    Ken is a designer, inventor, and member of the Blade Magazine Hall of Fame. He designed CRKT®’s Onion Skinner and Onion Shenanigan.

    To learn more about Ken, check out CRKT’s bio.

     

    M16-14 Titanium and M21 Carson Folder designed by Kit Carson

    M16-14 TitaniumKit CarsonM21 Carson Folder

    Kit Carson has made knives for over 30 years. His background in hunting and fishing and his time spent around the world in the Army as a professional soldier have influenced his work as a knife designer. Kit concentrates his work on building solid, functional knives rather than knives that simply follow a fad.

    Kit has been a full-time knife maker since 1993 and has designed the M16-14 Titanium and the M21 Carson Folder.

    To learn more about Kit, check out CRKT’s bio.

     

    Ultima 5” designed by Michael and Balthazar Martinez

    Ultima 5"        Michael and Baltazar Martinez

    Michael Martinez and his father, Baltazar E. Martinez, have invented a variety of products over the years, including the redesign of the fixed blade to provide more comfort and control with the patent-pending Ultima. Michael is a former student of R.C. Gorman and specializes in large-scale bronze casting. This sculptor, martial artist, and active club boxer has spent time working privately and in corporate collections internationally, and is the president of Group Design, Inc., along with other design firms and organizations.

    For over 30 years, Baltazar worked for the defense department as a mechanical engineer on a classified nuclear system design. Together, the Martinez’ have created the Ultima 5”- Black Blade with a Veff Combo Edge.

    To learn more about Michael and Baltazar, check out CRKT’s bio.

     

    No matter which knife you choose to use in your adventuring, CRKT® can help make the most out of your experience.

    Which of these knives seems like the best fit for you?

    -Kim

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: Survival, survival gear, gear, CRKT, knives, tactical knife, weapon

  • We all know that Mountain House food can help you to survive in an emergency, but did you know that an empty Mountain House pouch can help as well?

    8 Unexpected Uses for a Mountain House Pouch

    Recently, Mountain House’s Instagram page created a series illustrating various ways to re-use a Mountain House Pouch. Here’s what they came up with.

    1. Bet you didn’t know you could use a Mountain House pouch to warm up your sleeping bag . . . Simply fill up an empty (clean) pouch with hot water and place by your feet inside your sleeping bag.

     8 Unexpected Uses for a Mountain House Pouch

     

    1. How about using an empty pouch to wash your utensils while camping? This is a great way to conserve water and to get your utensils clean without them getting lost. Simply put soapy water in, close, and shake—no scrubbing required! You could even use the water to clean other small items.

    8 Unexpected Uses for a Mountain House Pouch

    1. Use a clean Mountain House Pouch as a Waterproof container for your keys, cell phone, and other items you don’t want to get wet while exploring a lake or going white water rafting.

     8 Unexpected Uses for a Mountain House Pouch

    Inspired by Mountain House’s idea, we’ve come up with five more ways to re-use a Mountain House pouch in an emergency:

    1. If you’re lost in the wild and need a container to filter water into, use your empty Mountain House pouch as a container to drink from.
    2. You can carry extra water for cooking and cleaning in Mountain House pouches.
    3. Use a clean Mountain House pouch as a waterproof mini emergency kit (similar to an SOL origin survival pack) to carry with you in your day pack.
    4. Searching for wild edibles, but don’t have a basket or container to carry them back to camp? You can use a Mountain House pouch to collect edible plants and flowers. For plants that need water to stay fresh before cooking, you can add a little water into the pouch.
    5. Lost in the woods and need a way to signal for help? Open up your Mountain House pouch and use the silver lining inside to reflect the sun similar to a signaling mirror.

    Have you ever used a Mountain House pouch or another unconventional tool to help you during a camping trip or emergency? We’d love to hear about your experience!

     

    -Angela

    Photos courtesy of Mountain House Instagram

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: food storage, mountain house

  • Know your Zone: Hurricane Prep in the Big Apple

    At the beginning of June, my hometown’s major league baseball team geared up for its annual trouncing by the New York Yankees. Which is why it pains me to say that I’ve discovered something really useful and positive coming out of New York this summer. I’ll be big and put my fanaticism behind me because this is really cool.

    It’s a branch of New York City’s government website called “Know Your Zone,” and it’s a combination of compiled resources and awareness-raising branding, all related to hurricane preparedness. The gist of New York’s hurricane preparation program is the division of the region into evacuation zones, all color-coded on bright and legible maps, and putting in place smooth communication systems to take care of each zones’ residents in the event of a storm.

    As far as I’m concerned, the genius of the site is the way it collects loads of information from several different offices and pages into one place—a sort of one-stop-shopping experience for hurricane preparedness.

    The main page is divided into three sections, with hurricane and evacuation FAQs at the bottom, and useful links and downloads in the middle, including these really smartly designed virtual badges for local businesses’ websites.

     Zone pic

    The top bit, though, is where the real meat is. Large, graphic buttons, with titles like “Find Your Zone,” and “Make a Plan,” send you to other nyc.gov sites, where you can access resources like hurricane evacuation maps or the Office of Emergency Management’s videos and checklists. One of the buttons even shoots you over to the “Notify New York” program, where you can enroll to receive emergency updates via email, voicemail, or text.

     

    What I love so much about this is that it feels like a neighborhood emergency plan, but on a city-wide scale. Anything that serves the dual purpose of preparedness education and bringing communities together in a common effort gets my vote. Even if it does come from Yankee territory.

     

    What does your hometown have in place to deal with large-scale emergencies?

     

    -Stacey

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: hurricanes, Hurricane, hurricane preparedness

  • 5 Things you May not Know about Hurricane Season

    During my regular news trolling last week, I came across an AP headline that several of the big outlets had latched onto, titled “5 Things to Know About Hurricane Season.” You can read the same article from ABC News, Yahoo news, or The Washington Times, depending on your preferred association. But no matter how you access it, the upshot seems to be that it’s a year to breathe easy. El Niño’s back, which, the article claims, means warmer weather and both fewer and less intense storms. This is great news, considering hurricane season officially began June 1st, and I would really rather work on my tan than stock up on emergency candles during all this beautiful weather.

    Except maybe not.

    The Weather Channel, acting in its official capacity as the smart kid that nobody likes, has put out its own “5 Things” list, which isn’t, but could be subtitled, “Don’t Get Too Comfortable Yet.” In particular, the article points out how complicated and unpredictable a factor El Niño is (depending on geographical location, the warmer currents of El Niño can either lessen or increase the severity of storms), and reminds us that “below average” storm systems can still be devastating.

    For those of us who live in areas that are at all prone to hurricanes, this is not the time to get casual in our preparations. Fingers crossed that we don’t have a repeat of 2004, but, as the Weather Channel put it, “Perhaps a big anniversary will remind Americans it's possible, and it could happen again.”

    In case you missed the re-post a couple of months ago, our article, “How to Prepare for a Hurricane” includes a thorough list of downloadable resources and links to our 5-part Hurricane Preparedness mini-series.

     

    What are your best tips for hurricane preparedness?

     

    -Stacey Birk

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: natural disaster, Hurricane, hurricane preparedness

  • If you’ve never heard of microgreens before (or you’ve heard of them but don’t know much else), I have a major treat for you today.


    What are Microgreens?

    Microgreens come from the same seeds as regular greens, they’re just harvested much earlier. So, depending on the type of seed, you could actually do four things with them: sprout them, grow microgreens, grow baby greens, or let them grow to full-size heads of lettuce (or broccoli, or radishes, or whatever).

    Microgreens: What they are and how to use them

     

    What are the Benefits of Microgreens?

    “Cuteness” aside, microgreens have some great benefits for homesteaders, preppers, and urban gardeners:

    1)      Many microgreens may have more nutrients than their adult counterparts, according to this article from NPR.

    2)      They have a turnaround time of about 14 days from planting to harvest.

    3)      You can grow them in very little space—raise them in a windowsill, on your counter top, or in a little corner of an existing greenhouse.

    4)      They’re an easy, efficient way to get the familiar flavor, color, and texture into your food storage meals—think micro cilantro on your favorite tacos—and makes more meals possible, like a nice leafy salad (without the expense and labor of a full-grown garden).


    What Kind of Greens Can I Grow?

    If you’re worried about variety, you can put those fears to rest right now. A Google search for microgreen seeds landed me tons of sites to choose from, and from a quick glance at a few of those sites, here are some of the varieties I saw:

     

    Amarinth Arugula Basil
    Beet Broccoli Brussel Sprout
    Buckwheat Cabbage Cauliflower
    Celery Chard Chia
    Chives Cilantro Clover
    Collard Greens Curly Cress Endive
    Fennel Garlic Chives Kale
    Kohlrabi Leek Mizuna
    Mustard Parsley Pea
    Radish Sunflower Turnip

     


    How Can I Grow Microgreens at Home?

    It’s easier than you might think to grow microgreens. Follow these steps, and you’ll be in business:

    1)      Pick a fairly shallow tray (3-4 inches high). Make sure it has drainage holes. A lid is also really helpful.

    2)      Fill it with 1.5-2” of damp potting soil.

    3)      Scatter the seeds evenly across the soil. Don’t sow too many, but you can sow many more than you normally would if you were growing full-size veggies.

    4)      Use a board to gently press the seeds into the top of the soil.

    5)      The you can either:

    • Cover the seeds with a damp paper towel, which you’ll keep there until the greens need light
    • Use a fine-mesh sieve or colander to scatter a shallow layer of soil over the seeds.

    6)      Water well (but don’t overwater) to get things started, and keep the soil damp but well-drained until harvest.

    7)      Attach the lid, and put the tray in a sunny area. (If it gets too warm, these tender little greens can burn, so vent the lid if it seems like the container needs to cool down a bit).

    8)      Water regularly so the soil stays damp (but not soaked), and enjoy watching your greens grow!

    9)      Harvest at around 14 days. To harvest, simply cut the stems just above the soil line with a pair of sharp scissors.

    10)  Compost the used soil, and start again!


    How do I Use Microgreens in Recipes?

    Use your imagination to come up with great ways to use your harvest! Here are a few ideas to get you started:

    1)      Make a microgreen salad—treat the greens just like you would full-size greens.

    2)      Use them in place of full-grown lettuce on sandwiches, hamburgers, tacos, tostadas, or any other recipe where you’d typically use lettuce.

    3)      Add them to soups for a fresh flavor and a slight crunch.

    4)      Top off a delicious appetizer with just the right hint of flavor.

    5)      Make your food tasty and beautiful by using microgreens as a delicious garnish.

    6)      Juice them.

    7)      Add them to a smoothie.

     

    Have you ever grown or used microgreens? How do you (or would you) use them?

     

    --Urban Girl

     

     

     

    Sources:

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2012/08/29/160274163/introducing-microgreens-younger-and-maybe-more-nutritious-vegetables

    http://www.organicgardening.com/learn-and-grow/growing-microgreens-indoors

    Microgreens: A Guide to Growing Nutrient-Packed Greens by Eric Franks & Jasmine Richardson

    http://www.growingmicrogreens.com/microgreen-seeds?ps=60

    http://sproutpeople.org/seeds/microgreens/

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: gardening

  • Drought Update: Lake Powell's Bleakest Year Yet

    We’ve talked a lot this year about the destructive drought choking the western US. And while California gets most of the attention (check out UNL’s drought monitor and their frighteningly visual perspective on California’s situation), other states are suffering, as well. In fact, the drop in a single reservoir is affecting residents of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, Wyoming, Utah—and California! This headline from the Daily Mail sums up the dangerous situation:

    “Satellite images reveal mud-choked Lake Powell is LESS than half full and has hit a record low as the Western drought continues to strain major reservoirs”

    The article, which features a chilling image gallery of the barely recognizable vacation spot, reports that Lake Powell currently sits at 42% of its capacity, with experts estimating that this year’s snowmelt will only bring it up to about 51%. And it’s not just bad news for boaters. The man-made reservoir serves as a source of drinking water for 20 million people living across the west, and the Glen Canyon dam that regulates the reservoir provides hydroelectric power to the area.

    While forecasters predict a cool, wet “El Niño” year for 2014, Eric Holthaus over at Slate.com explains why that won’t be enough to recover from this decade-plus long dry spell in his article, “What Does El Niño Mean For Me?”. With no end in sight, then, how can we…er…weather this storm?

    For ideas on ways to prepare against the effects of severe drought, check out these helpful posts:

    And for a recap of this year’s drought and its unexpected effects, read here:

     

    What are you doing differently this year because of the drought?

     

    -Stacey

    Posted In: Uncategorized

  • iStock_000011554172Small_america

    To celebrate the diversity of our amazing country, we’re highlighting some traditional recipes from each region of the United States. The best part is many of these recipes can be adapted to fit your food storage needs.

    As we “tour” the country, you’ll learn where some of America’s favorite dishes originated and why they’re special to each region. Click on the pictures below to find recipes for each dish, and then add them to your food storage recipe collection.

     

    New England

    Enriched by the influx of Native Americans, as well as Irish and Italian immigrants, the New England area has introduced America to foods like potatoes, chowder, pork, cabbage, pasta, sausage, baked beans, and flavorful sauces from Italy. Did you know? New England cuisine also gave us tasty treats like apple pie, cranberry sauce, and blueberry muffins.

     New England Corn and Potato Chowder

     New England Corn and Potato Chowder

     

    The South

    Known for its soul food, seafood, and pork dishes, the South has introduced the taste of Spain and the British isles to the US. Some southern favorites include cornbread, ham, bacon, pit-barbecued pork, deep-fried meats and vegetables, hushpuppies, collard greens, and black-eyed peas. But don’t forget about dessert: sweet potato pie, banana pudding, and red velvet cake are all southern favorites.

    So, kick back with a bowl of cracklins (deep-fried pork skins) and a tall glass of lemonade or sweet tea and check out these delicious southern treats.

     Southern food: Chicken Hushpuppies with Blackberry Mustard

    Chicken Hushpuppies with Blackberry Mustard

     

    More Southern Recipes to try:

    Easy ‘Nana’ Pudding

    Fried Green Tomatoes 

     

    Cajun and Creole-Louisiana

    Although Louisiana is technically considered “the South,” the cuisine and culture of rural southern Louisiana and the city of New Orleans are so distinct they deserve a section of their own. So, have you ever wondered what the difference between Creole and Cajun food is?

    Creole cuisine refers to a blend of French, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Native American, Canary Island, and African influences on food available to the early settlers in the area.

    Cajun food features what is called the “culinary holy trinity” of onions, bell peppers, and celery, included in most savory dishes. It emphasizes one-pot meals such as Jambalaya (influenced by Spanish paella), Dirty Rice, and Crawfish Etouffée.

    As they say in New Orleans, Bon appétit, e laissez les bons temps rouler!

     Beignets

     Beignets

     

    More Recipes from Louisiana to try:

    Shrimp Etouffee

    Creamy Cajun Chicken 

     

    Midwest: America’s Heartland

    The central heartland of America, also known as the Midwest or the “nation’s breadbasket,” consists of North and South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio. Often, when we think of the Midwest, images of rolling hills, farms, and fruit and grain fields come to mind.

    Did you know that many of America’s favorite foods originated in the Midwest? Hot dogs, hamburgers, corn dogs, ice cream cones, pretzels, Reuben sandwiches, and our favorite dairy products (cheese!) were all first made in America’s Heartland.

    Aside from the American favorites we enjoy from this region, the Midwest also has a strong German, Polish, Hungarian, and Scandinavian influence, bringing us foods like sauerkraut, Cornish pasties, bratwurst, goulash, and rye bread.

     Cornish Pasties

     Cornish Pasties from America’s Heartland

     

    More recipes from the Heartland to try:

    Chicken Paprikash (Hungarian)

    Lefse (Norwegian Flatbread)

     

    The Southwest

    The rustic cooking of Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, Utah, Nevada, and southern California is a combination of Mexican, American cowboy, and Native American foods combined with the domesticated beef and pork grown in Texas. Tex-Mex cuisine, a type of food combining Mexican and cowboy dishes, thrives in this area.

    “Fresh-Mex” cuisine, Chimichangas, Nachos, Fajijitas, and Chili Con Queso and several variations of Chili were also developed in this region. In fact, the spicy meat and/or bean stew we call Chili originated in Texas. Other variations include casseroles like Chicken-Green Chili Enchilada casserole and Tamale pie. Tortilla soup, which originated in the Southwest, has also become a popular favorite in restaurants and homes across the country.

    Todos son deliciosos!

     Tamale Pie

    Tamale Pie

     

     

    More Southwestern Recipes to try:

    Horchata (Spiced Milk)

    Authentic San Antonio Tex-Mex Chili

    Mexican Rice (with tomatoes)

     

    The Northwest

    For our purposes, the Northwestern United States includes northern California (San Francisco and farther north), Washington, Oregon, Alaska, Idaho, and parts of Montana. As with all regions, the origin of those who settled there, combined with the cooking of the Native Americans and the available natural foods all contributed to the cuisine.

    The northern forests abound with game and the waters teem with fish and seafood. This region brings us meals like elk steak, venison sloppy joes, and lamb stew. In the waters, Salmon is king among the fish of the Northwest. Scallops, mussels, shrimp, and clams are popular favorites, as well. In addition to the meat and game, apples, peaches, berries, apricots, cherries, and sweet onions grow in abundance in this region.

    Mixed Berry Pie

     Mixed Berry Pie 

     

     

    The California Coast 

    California—especially Southern California—has developed a cuisine so unique that it qualifies for a discussion of its own in American cookery. Blessed with a climate that produces nuts, fruits, vegetables, and a coastline full of fresh seafood, California cooks emphasize using local produce and seafood in season. They prefer to keep it light and healthy, quickly cooked, and combined in unusual ways. However, the food in this area also has influences from Mexican and Southwestern cooking.

    “Fusion cooking” originates here, combining flavors and foods from different ethnic traditions in new ways. An example would be a combination of Chinese or Thai ingredients topping a pizza. Check out our recipes from the California Coast.

    Cherry Walnut Salad

    Cherry Walnut Salad with Raspberry Vinaigrette

     

     

    What’s your favorite state or regional recipe?

    -Angela and Sharon

    Posted In: Uncategorized

  • Why Buy Mountain House from Emergency Essentials?

    Over their 40-year history, Mountain House has perfected the art of freeze-drying and packaging delicious meals for the military, outdoor enthusiasts, and long-term emergency food storage. Walk in to any sporting goods store, and you’ll probably find a display of Mountain House pouches ready and waiting to supply you with food for your next camping trip.

    However, there are several benefits to buying Mountain House products from Emergency Essentials that other stores just don’t offer.

    Here are 9 reasons why Emergency Essentials is the best place to buy Mountain House for your next outdoor adventure or for your emergency supplies:

    1. Unparalleled Selection: We sell the complete assortment of Mountain House Products, including new, seasonal, and limited-time products
    2. EE Exclusives: We stock some unique items and combos you simply won’t find anywhere else.
    3. Ready to Ship: These products are stocked in our warehouse and ready to ship immediately.
    4. Freshest Inventory: Because we sell large quantities, we receive frequent shipments—so you know you’re getting the freshest product possible.
    5. Lowest Price in the Country—Guaranteed: As one of Mountain House’s largest distributors, we have the buying power to bring you low prices. We’ll always have the best price (and if we don’t, we’ll match it).
    6. Emergency Essentials’ Stamp of Approval: Mountain House products have been prepared in our test kitchens and tasted by our experts and they meet or exceed our standards.
    7. We Guarantee Your Satisfaction 100%: You can try Mountain House for the first time without a care in the world—if you don’t like it, let us known within 30 days of your purchase, and we’ll take care of it! (But we’re pretty sure you’re going to love it.)
    8. Get everything you need in one place—and in one order: We have all your food storage and preparedness needs covered—just add whatever you need to your order and they’ll all arrive together, direct from our warehouse—and fast!
    9. You always get accurate, honest information when you do business with us. That’s just the way we do things around here.

    If you haven’t tried Mountain House before, give it a try! If you’ve tried it, tell us what you love about it!

     

    -Angela

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: food storage, mountain house

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