Why I Prepare: Lessons from the Colorado Floods

October 1, 2013

In light of the recent Colorado floods and all the damage that has occurred as a result, we want to share a series of posts from one Colorado woman’s perspective. Opinions expressed are hers and do not necessarily reflect those of Emergency Essentials.

If you lived through the recent Colorado floods and want to share your story, please email social@beprepared.com.

Parts of Colorado are still a disaster right now, and they will be for a long time—especially Boulder and most towns north of Denver. Because of the amount of severe damage to the land and the houses, many people are going without normal necessities like electricity, clean water, or—in some cases—even a home. We still have to boil our water until further notice and we don't have a working hot water heater yet.

Image from the 2013 Colorado Floods

 

So many people don't realize what a great need there is to prepare for any kind of an emergency. This could happen to anyone at any time. I am lucky enough to have been preparing for any emergency for quite a while and just finished preserving everything from my garden before the flooding.

I can also share with you how disappointed I was with my son during the flood. He wasn't prepared for an emergency. On day 1 of the flooding when he realized he was stranded and couldn't leave his town, he also realized he needed food. He said the store shelves were already bare when he finally got there. We couldn't get to each other so he was on his own.

Had he been prepared with emergency supplies and emergency food, he would have been able to spend more time at his home during the floods instead of wasting precious time out looking for food.

That’s why I prepare.

--Sandy, CO

 

Thanks, Sandy! These Colorado floods are a harsh reminder of why it's important to prepare—and how unexpectedly a disaster can occur. Our prayers and well-wishes continue to go out to all those affected.

Check out the Rest of the Series:

Why I Prepare: Lessons from the Colorado Floods, Part 2


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