Getting Started

June 5, 2009 | 11 comment(s)

Many people ask, “Where do I begin when it comes to Emergency Preparedness?

We'd answer that question by saying that the first thing you should do is to get information first. Information is the most valuable tool to have in an emergency. We have a large collection of Emergency Preparedness Insight Articles that can help you to obtain this vital preparedness information.

Get Started on your Prepping by reading Emergency Essentials Insight Articles

Insight Article Topics:

Take a look at some of these articles to start or refresh your prepper education. These articles will help get yourself and your family invested in emergency preparedness. There are over 90 articles to choose from within 13 different categories. Insight Categories include:

 

Preparedness Checklists and Downloads

Another great way to get started (with no cost involved) is to develop a personal or family emergency preparedness plan. Check out our Preparedness Checklist page to start creating an emergency plan or to build your emergency kit today. You can print these plans directly from our website. Here are the checklists we have to offer:

 

A Few More Tips for Getting Started

Here are a few ideas and tips to get you started with your preparedness plan after you have your Family Evacuation Plan in place:

  • Establish a modest preparedness budget. Make it a priority and work at it the best you can. Start with a few items, such as: water (both portable and permanent), an emergency kit, emergency candles, a sleeping bag, and a first-aid kit or an emergency bag.
  • Get your information from reliable sources. Don’t let anyone scare you into thinking that it has to be done all at once or that you must incur heavy debt to achieve your goals.
  • Use short-term storage as a guide for long-term needs. The items required to sustain life for three days can easily be multiplied for planning long-term storage needs.
  • Be consistent. Within a short time you will have the necessary supplies and equipment to take care of yourself, family members, and others.
  • Think investment, not expense. Take care of what you purchase and learn not to waste.

Remember that babies, small children, the elderly, pets, and those with special medical needs require special consideration when planning for an emergency. We offer some great information to help you with these groups.

For those of you wondering how and where to begin, we hope this post will be helpful. For others who have already started, we welcome your input to help and assist those who are just beginning. An inner confidence results as one strives to do their best to become prepared.


This post was posted in Uncategorized and was tagged with pets, Emergency plan, family, water, First Aid, children, water storage, getting started, emergency kit checklist, Preparedness Checklist, special needs

Comments

  • Tammy  |  June 5, 2009

    Thank you for the link to all of those articles. I wasn't quite sure what an insight article was, but now I know. They have some wonderful preparedness information.

  • Keith  |  June 5, 2009

    Great looking family picture! ;)

  • June  |  June 6, 2009

    I think this is wonderful. I want to do so many things to get my home and family ready for any emergency and then run around doing nothing because I don't know where to start. Your insight articles are very helpful. So was the fire escape plan. I've also tried a couple of your products and they are very good.

  • Tilly  |  June 6, 2009

    My family and I had to give up our year supply 1 or 2 years ago due to a situation that is too long to explain. I used to have a list of items you would buy or put away every week for like $5.00 a week a person. I lost that list when I had to give up my year supply. I was wondering if anyone out there has that list and could send me a copy of that list. <br /><br />Thank you,<br /><br />Tilly Morrison

  • Gmemory  |  June 7, 2009

    Preparedness is more than &quot;stuff&quot; or a kit. It is a frame of mind and training more than anything else. There is a reasonable chance that you won&#39;t be anywhere near your &quot;kit&quot; when an emergency happens. Be prepared to do something with whatever you have available. Of course, get a kit and a home storage or system ready...and then use it/practice with it regularly. Dont&#39; just buy this stuff and then let it sit in a corner, lulled into a the trap that you are &quot;ready&quot;. In the end, something is better than nothing, I suppose.

  • Grant  |  June 7, 2009

    Good advice.

  • JAN DEE SHAFFER  |  June 8, 2009

    Thanks for this great site.

  • Anonymous  |  June 9, 2009

    In future issues I&#39;d like to see a discussion re a Federal Emergency due to Terrorism/Homeland Security and the inevitable confusion in communications with family/freinds/loved ones who are commuted at the time of emergecy.

  • Mulder  |  June 11, 2009

    Thanks for the checklists... those are great and simple... wonderful for a new family like mine!<br /><br />RD<br />Fort Collins, CO

  • Old Blue  |  September 14, 2009

    Good points and info. I think this is important for all families to focus on. Thanks for the article.<br /><br /><a href="http://www.emergencymadeeasy.com" rel="nofollow">Emergency Survival</a>

  • angela  |  May 27, 2011

    Thank you for the tips on prepping for younger older, or special needs members of your party. Do you think there might be a stowaway in your group who isn&#39;t prepping now? Then go ahead and count that person on your prep list.

Post a Comment