Monthly Archives: January 2014

  •  The Long, Hot Winter: The California Drought

    While the Northeast and Midwest shiver through one of the coldest and snowiest winters in recent history, other parts of the country would trade their palm trees and avocados for just a little rainfall. Earlier this month, California’s governor declared an official drought emergency. Ten other states have also been labeled as “disaster sites” by Federal Agriculture officials.

    Parts of Arkansas, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Kansas, New Mexico, Nevada, Oklahoma, Texas, and Utah are all facing historically low water levels. The lakes and reservoirs losing water in these states have led to decreased water supplies in the West. This prolonged dry spell has even contributed to several wildfires.

    According to NBC news, Governor Brown believes this is the worst drought California has seen in 100 years. He’s asking Californians to cut their water usage by 20 percent.

    Since everyday services (like gas and electricity) are not affected by droughts, it can be hard to think of a drought as an emergency situation. However, it still doesn’t hurt to be prepared. Having a ready supply of home water storage will help you during a drought. See our water storage products  for more great options to beat a drought or another emergency.

    For helpful tips on how to save water in a drought, check out Fema.gov’s  list of water conservation tips. Also, this “Water—Use it Wisely” infographic illustrates 100+ ways to conserve water you may have never considered before.

    Learn how to conserve water by taking our “Water Challenge: One Gallon of Water for One Day.” You’ll be surprised at how much water you use in a typical day, especially when you only have one gallon for your cooking, drinking, and sanitation needs. Use this challenge to determine how much water to store for your family’s home water storage. Most people find that they want the "luxury" of a few additional gallons per day.

     

    --Stacey and Angela

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: water, water storage, drought

  • Roscoe Bartlett living off the grid

    If you live in the city, there are many luxuries to enjoy—power with the flick of a switch, grocery stores or shopping malls less than five minutes away, constant communication with everyone via cell phone, internet, or radio. So . . . could you ever find yourself living off the grid?

    After 20 years on Capitol Hill, Congressman Roscoe Bartlett has taken himself completely off the grid, retreating to a secluded property in West Virginia. We came across Politico Magazine’s article via Instapundit and, whether or not you agree with Bartlett’s political views, we think there are some interesting things he’s done as a prepper that make this article worth reading.

    Bartlett lives without a phone, without a link to outside power, and without municipal plumbing. He has developed quite a few skills that will help him if he gets into an emergency.

    For the past few decades, Bartlett spent his free time up at this property, prepping it for the day he’d go off the grid. He built five cabins by himself, then wired solar panels and ran pipes from freshwater springs to each cabin.

    Living completely off the grid, he rises at dawn six days a week in order to maintain his power sources, food, and way of life. He spends about 10 hours a day cutting logs, gardening, and doing other tasks around the land.

    “People ask me ‘Why?’” Bartlett said in an interview with Politico Magazine. “I ask people why you climb Mount Everest. It’s a challenge, and it’s challenging to think what life would be like if there weren’t any grid and there weren’t any grocery stores. That’s what life was like for our forefathers.”

    Read more of Roscoe Bartlett’s experience living off the grid (and why he chose to do so) in the Politico article, “The Congressman Who Went off the Grid

    What changes would you have to make to your lifestyle if you went completely off the grid? Would you do it?

    Photo Courtesy of Politico Magazine

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: emergency power, solar power, skills, Survival, emergency preparedness, off the grid

  • Thousands of commuters in the South were stranded en route Tuesday and into Wednesday because of  snowy conditions during an unexpected winter storm. 

    Many spent 10-12 hours in their vehicles, trying to conserve gas, power, and warmth. Others took shelter with nearby strangers, who generously opened their homes; and some (like the 5,300 students in Alabama) were even forced to camp out in school buildings or sleep the night in buses.

    CNN reported the panic that spread when what was supposed to be a light dusting of snow turned to chaos. A thin sheet of ice and 3-10 inches of snow on the roads (depending on location) left thousands of people stranded in their vehicles during their commute home.

    As one woman went into labor, she set off for the hospital only to find gridlock after gridlock blocked her path. She called the paramedics, but they, too, had no clear route to reach her car through the disorder that Tuesday’s winter storm blew in, leaving her stranded on the road.

    The weather was also a factor in over 1,000 fender benders, five deaths in Alabama, and another 23 injuries.

    The traffic problems began when schools, businesses, and government offices sent people home at the exact same time due to the weather.

    According to Yahoo! News, “as people waited in gridlock, the snow [built up], the roads froze, cars ran out of gas and tractor-trailers jackknifed, blocking equipment that could have treated some of the roads.”

    Winter storms catch the South by surprise

    The desperate situation brought many people together to help stranded motorists. Residents near the highway opened their homes to strangers who needed food, water, and a warm place to stay. Others offered their services, as well, including a police officer who helped deliver a daughter to the pregnant woman stranded in her car.

    "There was a sense that we are all in this together,” said Mira Lowe, a CNN editor who watched as people left their vehicles to help others.

    Check out stories from other stranded drivers here

    Read the rest of CNN’s article “Atlanta mayor blames poor coordination for storm snafu

    Read Yahoo! News’ article “Helicopters search for stranded Southern drivers

    Do you know what to do in a snow and ice storm? Having a car emergency kit can definitely help by giving you food, water, warmth, and other needed supplies.

    Check out these articles for more ways you can stay safe in the cold:

    Emergency Warmth

    Stuck in the Snow? How’s your Emergency Car Kit?

    How to Winterize your Car

     

    Video Courtesy of CNN

    Photo Courtesy of Yahoo! News

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: winter storms, Winter, emergency kit, Survival, emergency preparedness, natural disaster, winter preparedness, South

  • What do a smart phone’s GPS system and a seismograph have in common?

     What do a Smart Phone's GPS and a Seismograph have in common?

    The main parts used to create GPS receivers can also be used to create a system of sensors that will help improve warnings or response times to severe weather, floods, tsunamis, and earthquakes. According to the Christian Science Monitor, researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California have been working on a prototype system of sensors that works using a network of GPS receivers to track changes along earthquake faults in the western United States.

    Researchers found that “by adding inexpensive temperature, air pressure, and motion sensors common in today’s smart phones . . . the system can arm forecasters and emergency managers with important information earlier and more frequently than using existing techniques.” These sensors can also be added to other buildings and structures to measure damage after an earthquake.

    Several areas, buildings, and structures in southern California have already begun testing these new GPS weather sensors. Researchers are pleased with the results: this prototype system has proven to be “faster, more accurate, more reliable, and more versatile than current tools” used to measure seismic activity. The ultimate goal of using this sensor on structures is to help emergency managers get a faster, clearer sense of where the heaviest damage to and tilting of, buildings is occurring happening

    To read more about how this new GPS sensor works, as well as where and how it is being used on structures and buildings in southern California, check out the Christian Science Monitor article, “Smart Phone Technology Boosts Early Warning for Extreme Weather, Quakes.”

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: Earthquake

  • Nothing tastes better on a rainy or cold day than a savory bowl of hot soup. Homemade soup is simple to make because you can use ingredients you already have in the fridge or pantry. In addition, making your own soup will give you more variety than buying a pre-canned or dried soup mix from the store.

    Although store-bought soups certainly have their place in our diet and in our food storage, why not spice up this familiar comfort food by trying some of recipes listed below? Each recipe gives you a chance to test out cooking with food storage, while helping your family get used to eating food storage products.

     

    BEST-EVER CLAM CHOWDER

    Clam Chowder with Food Storage ingredients

    Yield: Serves 4-6

    1½ cups reconstituted Provident Pantry Freeze Dried Potato Dices

    2/3 cup reconstituted Provident Pantry Freeze Dried Celery Pieces

    ½ cup reconstituted MyChoice Freeze Dried Chopped Onions

    Provident Pantry Iodized Salt (to taste)

    MyChoice Mesh Black Pepper (to taste)

    2 cans minced clams

    2 tablespoons Red Feather Butter

    2 tablespoons Provident Pantry White Flour

    4-5 cups of reconstituted Provident Pantry Instant Nonfat Dry Milk

    Dash of nutmeg

    ¼ teaspoon liquid smoke

    Dash of dried parsley

     

    Directions

    1. Place prepared potatoes, celery, and onion in saucepan.  Drain liquid from both cans of clams onto the veggies and add just enough water to cover them.
    2. Add salt and pepper and allow mixture to simmer until potatoes are tender.  Set aside.
    3. In a heavy saucepan (different from the saucepan used before), melt butter and stir in flour.  Whisk in milk and stir until blended.  Cook, whisking often to avoid scorching, until mixture is thick.
    4. Stir in liquid smoke and nutmeg, then cooked vegetables.  Stir well. Add clams, heat for just a minute more and serve, topping each serving with a dash of dried parsley.  

    Nice to add:  Bits Provident Pantry Freeze-Dried Ham or crisp Yoder’s Bacon

     

     

    COCK-A-LEEKIE SOUP

    Chicken and Leek Soup from food storage

    Yield: Serves 6

    This Scottish soup gets its name from chicken broth (the cock-a-doodle-do) and leeks (a delicious, mild-flavored member of the onion family that looks like giant, fat green onions).

    Leeks are very popular throughout the British Isles, but are also beginning to be appreciated in the U.S. They’re even a national symbol of Wales. Leeks are nutritious and very good in soup or stuffing. They are also good braised, creamed, or raw in salads.

    Note:  Clean your leeks well before cooking, as the green leaves tend to trap soil that farmers mound around them as they grow.

    Ingredients

    3 large leeks (or 2 cups reconstituted MyChoice Green Onion if no leeks are available)

    2 tablespoons Red Feather Butter

    2 tablespoons Provident Pantry White Flour

    Salt and pepper (to taste)

    4-5 cups reconstituted Provident Pantry Chicken (Vegetarian) Broth

    ¾ cup Provident Pantry Instant Nonfat Dry Milk, reconstituted

     Directions

    1. Clean and trim leeks and slice thinly. (They won’t make you cry!) You’ll want to include an inch or so of the green part of the leeks if it’s not too tough.
    2. Melt butter in a heavy saucepan and add leeks (or green onions), stirring well.  Cook on medium heat for a few minutes until they begin to be translucent, then add flour and mix well.
    3. Add chicken broth and stir so that flour is mixed into the broth.
    4. Allow to cook on medium-low until leeks are tender and broth has thickened a little. Taste for seasonings and add salt and pepper as desired.
    5. Just before serving, stir in milk or cream and heat a little longer, but do not allow to boil.

    Good to add (with the broth):  1 cup reconstituted Provident Pantry Freeze Dried Potato Dices; 1 cup washed, chopped kale; bits of Provident Pantry Freeze Dried Chicken; Provident Pantry Freeze Dried Ham, Yoder’s Bacon, or MyChoice Freeze Dried Broccoli.

     

     

    CREAMY SQUASH SOUP

    Creamy Squah Soup made with food storage

     

    Yield: Serves 6

    Ingredients

    2 ½ cups cooked winter squash (works well with Butternut, Banana, Acorn,  Hubbard squash, or pumpkin)

    ½ cup reconstituted MyChoice Freeze Dried Chopped Onions

    ½ cup reconstituted Provident Pantry Freeze Dried Celery Pieces

    1 tablespoon Red Feather Butter

    3 cups Provident Pantry Vegetarian Chicken Flavored Broth

    1 cup Provident Pantry Instant Nonfat Dry Milk—or 1 small package cream cheese, depending upon how creamy and rich you like it

    Salt and pepper to taste

    2 tablespoons Provident Pantry Sugar—optional, if you like sweeter soup

    ½ teaspoon nutmeg

    ½ teaspoon ground ginger

     Directions

    1. Cook your squash or pumpkin; you can do this in a variety of ways, see methods for cooking your squash below. Scoop squash from any remaining rind and measure out about 2 ½ cups (you don’t have to be exactly accurate on this).
    1. Melt butter in a heavy saucepan and sauté onions and celery until onions are translucent but not browned.  Remove from pan.
    2. Heat broth in pan, and whisk in squash and seasonings.  Remove about half a cup to blender; add onions and celery and blend until smooth.  (If you’re using cream cheese, add this in chunks to blender with a little more broth mixture and continue to blend until smooth.)
    3. Whisk this blended mixture into that in the saucepan. If you’re using milk or half-and-half, add it to saucepan and blender mixture just before serving and whisk well to blend. Heat to warm the soup, but do not boil.
    4. Top each serving with a dollop of sour cream and an extra sprinkle of ginger, nutmeg, or paprika.

    Methods for cooking Your Squash:

    • Cut squash in half, remove seeds, and scrape any slippery fibers from the seed cavity. Bake the squash, covered with foil, and in a pan with a little water. The water steams it to a nice tenderness in 45-60 minutes.
    • Cut the squash into cubes and boil it in a saucepan until tender. 
    • Cut squash into pieces and cook in the microwave a few at a time.

     

    Do you have a favorite comfort-food soup recipe for winter months?

    --Sharon

     

     

    Sources:

    www.allrecipes.com/butternut-squash-soup

    www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/comfort

    The kitchen of Sharon Jarvis

     

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: food storage, recipes, recipe, emergency cooking

  • Throwing a party for the big game?  Still don’t know what to make for snacks?

    Cheer the Seahawks or Broncos on in style this Sunday by making these four food storage recipes that are sure to please a crowd.

    Corn Salsa

    Corn Salsa made from Food Storage for Superbowl Sunday

    1 Cup Provident Pantry Freeze-Dried Super Sweet Corn

    1 Cup Provident Pantry Black Beans

    ¼ Cup MyChoice Chopped Onions

    1 Cup Provident Pantry Freeze-Dried Tomatoes

    ½ Cup Avocado

    1 ½ tsp MyChoice Tomato Powder

    A pinch MyChoice Minced Garlic

    Fresh Cilantro (to taste)

    Provident Pantry Iodized Salt (to taste)

    MyChoice Mesh Black Pepper (to taste)

    Lime juice to taste

    Word of Advice:

    I’ve found that the best way to cook dried black beans is to soak them over night the day before you cook them.  This method ensures that your beans will be tender after they cook and ready to eat when your guests arrive.  Check out the blog “veggietativestate” to pick up some tips and benefits of cooking with dried beans and ways to reduce their . . . ahem . . . gaseous side effects.

     

    Red Salsa

    1 Cup Provident Pantry Freeze-Dried Tomatoes

    ½ tsp MyChoice Minced Garlic

    ½ Cup Provident Pantry Freeze-Dried Green Bell Pepper Dices

    Lime Juice (to taste. I put in 1 tsp)

    A Pinch of Provident Pantry Iodized Salt

    A Pinch of MyChoice Mesh Black Pepper

    ¾ tsp Provident Pantry Tomato Powder

    Word of Advice: To give your red salsa a more intense tomato flavor add Tomato Powder. In addition to Tomato Powder, you can also include Tabasco sauce, hot sauce, or Jalapeno peppers (if you have them) for a hot and spicy salsa.

     

    Meatball Sandwich

    Food Storage Meatball Sandwich for Super Bowl Sunday

    Makes four servings:

    1 ½ Cup reconstituted Provident Pantry Freeze-Dried Italian Meatballs 2 cups MyChoice Barbeque Sauce Mix

    1/2 Cup Provident Pantry Mozzarella Cheese

    1/2 Cup  Provident Pantry Green Pepper Dices

    Ciabatta Rolls

    Directions

    1. Reconstitute meatballs according to directions on the can (our serving of meatballs took us 30 minutes to make).
    2. Meanwhile reconstitute the BBQ sauce in a saucepan on the stove.
    3. Reconstitute cheese and green peppers.
    4. When meatballs have reconstituted, combine with the BBQ sauce and turn heat to medium to warm the mixture up.
    5. Add a ½ cup of meatball mixture to a Ciabatta roll. Top with green peppers and mozzarella cheese.

    Word of Advice: I know what you’re thinking . . . “30 minutes to reconstitute meatballs, that’s crazy?!”  Instead of trying the traditional “soaking method” for reconstituting meats, boil a pot of water. Once the water is boiling, put your meatballs into the water. Turn off the heat and let the meatballs sit in the pot for 10-15 minutes or until tender.

     

    Semi-Sweet Prepper-Style Muddy Buddies

    Semi-Sweet Prepper-Style Muddy Buddies for Super Bowl Sunday

     

    9 cups Rice Chex, Corn Chex, or Chocolate Chex cereal (or any combination)

    Semi-sweet Chocolate (see recipe below)

    ½ cup reconstituted Provident Pantry Peanut Butter Powder

    ¼ cup reconstituted Provident Pantry Butter powder

    1 tsp Imitation Vanilla Powder

    1 ½ cup Provident Pantry Powdered Sugar

     

    Chocolate Recipe

    ½ cup reconstituted Provident Pantry Butter Powder

    ¾-1 cup MyChoice Baking Cocoa

    ¾ cup Provident Pantry Powdered Sugar

    1/3 cup Provident Pantry Instant Milk

    1. In a medium-sized bowl, gradually mix the cocoa powder into the reconstituted butter. Stir until blended and mix until it becomes a paste.
    2. Microwave paste in 10 second intervals, stirring each time, until it’s smooth and creamy (be careful not to burn it)
    3. Gradually blend in milk and sugar. Mix well until the paste is smooth and creamy. Taste, and adjust with more sugar if necessary.
    4. Put chocolate to the side until ready to use for Muddy Buddies.

    Word of Advice: For a sweeter chocolate, add more powdered sugar (to taste) until you reach the desired flavor. I added ¾ cup gradually and the chocolate was closer to a “dark chocolate” flavor—more bitter than sweet. Once combined with the peanut butter, Chex, and powdered sugar, it all blended into a delicious treat.

     

    Muddy Buddies

    1. Measure cereal into a large bowl; set aside.
    2. Add reconstituted peanut butter powder and reconstituted butter powder to chocolate mixture. Stir until mostly smooth. Microwave in 10 second intervals until you can get it as smooth as possible. (Try mashing up the peanut butter before mixing with the chocolate to get a smoother consistency).
    3. Stir in vanilla. Pour mixture over cereal, stirring until evenly coated. Pour into 2-gallon resealable plastic bag.
    4. Add powdered sugar. Seal bag; shake until well coated. Spread on waxed paper to cool. Store in airtight container in refrigerator.

    Word of Advice: The vanilla doesn’t need to be reconstituted for this recipe. Simply measure out the powder and add to the mixture. You’ll still get the same delicious flavor.

    Enjoy the game!

    Looking for more party recipes to try? Check out our recipe page for more snacks, treats, and desserts to make.

    What’s your favorite food storage snack to make? Let us know in the comments

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: food storage, recipes, recipe, freeze-dried foods, freeze dried, freeze dried food, emergency cooking

  • Green Gadgets from 2013

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    Green Green Gadgets: The Goal Zero Yeti 150 can give you a quiet portable way to power your life

    It seems like advances in technology are coming along at a faster pace than ever before. According to The Next Web’s article 9 of the best green gadgets from 2013, there have been “. . . quite a few green gadgets that made waves in 2013, many making headway in terms of solar technology uses and energy conservation.”

    Featured among products like a bamboo keyboard and a Bluetooth Plant Monitor is the Goal Zero Yeti 150 Power Pack. This solar generator can power lights, phones, tablets, laptops … almost any device that’s USB powered. The Yeti 150 can charge in six hours from the wall, or in 15 hours using a Boulder 15 Solar Panel.

    Using solar power not only lets you collect power during a crisis, but helps save you from the bulk, noise, and toxic fumes that come from traditional generators. Power packs such as the Goal Zero Yeti 150, Goal Zero Yeti 400, and the Goal Zero Yeti 1250 give you a quiet, portable way to power your life whether you’re camping, living off the grid, or getting through an emergency. Don’t get caught off guard during a power outage.

    Learn more about solar power with our Insight article, “Solar Power: Clean, Quiet, and Safe” 

    To read more about the other green gadgets that came about in 2013, check out TNW’s article, 9 of the best green gadgets from 2013

    Has solar power ever helped you during an outdoor adventure or in an emergency?

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: solar power, preparedness, emergency preparedness, Goal Zero, green technology, generator, Yeti Solar Generator

  • Each Monday in January, we’re sharing our Preparedness New Year’s Resolutions for 2014. If you’d like to make some Prepping Resolutions of your own, but don’t know where to start, borrow some of our resolutions or use this series to get some ideas.

    This week we are talking about Outdoor Gear. Click here to check out Last week’s resolutions for Indoor Gear.

    Here is what our Emergency Essentials’ bloggers plan on getting to take with them into the great outdoors in 2014.

    Prepper Style New Year's Resolutions: Outdoor Gear

     

    Prepper Style New Year’s Resolutions : Outdoor Gear

    Sharon

    I resolve to get some good fire-starting supplies, such as the nifty little Sparkie Fire Starter, a can of Fired Up!, and some Waterproof and Windproof Matches. This would make it so much easier to start a campfire or get the charcoal grill going quickly, especially in windy conditions.

    Sarah

    If you’ve followed the Pennies for Prepping series, you may know that I bought a bit of outdoor gear last fall, including the Teton Outfitter XXL 1-Man Quick Tent and a Klymit Static V sleeping pad. I already have a sleeping bag, but I’d like to get something warmer this year, ideally before I go winter camping—maybe to something like the High Unita Gear Sleepy Ridge 10-Degree Sleeping Bag. I also want to get an Optimus Vega canister stove. Because, if I’m going to get a canister stove, it might as well be one that will work during all four seasons.

    Angela

    My New Year’s Resolution for outdoor gear is to learn how to make awesome shelters for different situations. I want to read and research about different shelters and how you make them in the Sense of Survival. Then, I want to go and test it out with a few materials I already have on hand at home. I want to do this so I can figure out what items I would need to make a stellar, warm, and insulated shelter. So I already know that I really want a ripstop tarp or two, duct tape, and maybe a tent like the Mountainsmith Morrison Two-person Tent if I can’t figure out how to make a shelter from natural materials. . .

    Kim

    This year, I’m going to learn how to start (and extinguish) a campfire. To learn this new skill, I want to add fire starting tools to my family’s emergency kits and camping supplies. Our family loves to camp, but not knowing how to build a fire can ruin the adventure pretty quickly on a cold night.  We will be adding the Sparkie, Spark-Lite, and H-25 Strike Master fire starters to our kits. We want to have a variety of fire starters on hand to ensure that we have a reliable method of lighting a fire, no matter the situation. (What if I lose one? If that’s my one and only method of starting a fire, I’m in trouble). By the end of 2014, my family will be campfire starting (and extinguishing) experts!

     

    What’s Your Advice?

    If you had to survive in the outdoors, what else would you bring?

    This is our last week for New Year’s Resolutions.  Now, let’s see how many of them we can keep! Check back here to see how we are making progress on our goals in the coming months.

    Check out all the Prepper Style New Year’s Resolutions from the beginning of January on our blog.

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: skills, emergency kit, Survival, emergency preparedness

  • Drought conditions help spread wildfires across California

    Wildfires swept through Central and Coastal California earlier this week and the severe drought conditions aren’t helping this prolonged fire season.

    CBS News reported fires engulfing buildings, burning homes, climbing mountainsides, and forcing evacuations across the state.

    "The lack of rain and the unseasonably dry conditions . . . make fire conditions just as bad as in the middle of fire season," said Scott Bahrenfuss of the Rio Vista Fire Department.

    On Kimball Island, what began as a 10-foot brush fire sparked into a 40-acre wildfire as intense wind speeds picked up. In Southern California, a 2-acre fire damaged two homes, two mobile homes, three motor homes, 40 vehicles, and roughly a dozen structures.

    Other areas left fire fighters scrambling to fight off the flames encroaching on some homes, while others were left to burn. As the fires spread, many residents were forced to abandon their homes, including the 15 people on Kimball Island.

    Check out CBS News’ newscast:

    With the extremely arid conditions in California, people should be extra careful with how they use fire. Simple actions such as flicking a cigarette butt out a car window or lighting a small campfire could start a rapid wildfire the sparks hit dry grass.

    To read more about the fires in Southern California, check out the following articles:

    What would you do if you were caught in a wildfire? Would you be prepared to bug out right away?

    Check out the articles below to make sure you’re prepared:

    Make and Practice a Fire Escape Plan

    Fire Season Safety and Preparedness Tips

     

    Video courtesy of CBS News

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: preparedness, Survival, emergency preparedness, natural disaster, fire, California Wildfire, drought

  • Each Monday in January, we’re sharing our Preparedness New Year’s Resolutions for 2014. If you’d like to make some Prepping Resolutions of your own, but don’t know where to start, borrow some of our resolutions or use this series to get some ideas.

    This week we are talking about Indoor Gear. Click here to check out Last week’s resolutions for Preparedness Skills.

    Prepper Style New Year's Resolutions: Indoor Gear

    Here is what our Emergency Essentials’ bloggers plan on purchasing as Indoor Gear items for 2014:

    New Year’s Resolution Prepper Style: Indoor Gear

    Sharon

    I resolve to get a Kitchen Plus 2000 Hand-Powered Food Processor. Based on its great customer reviews, I’m quite sure I’d use it often—not just on the rare occasion when our power goes out!

    Sarah

    I love the indoors. I really do. Even though I’m committed to learning more skills and spending time in the outdoors this year, climate-controlled spaces with running water and plumbing are really more my cup of tea. However, just because I love the indoors doesn’t mean the plumbing, A/C, furnace, or electricity will always be working—especially following a natural disaster.

    This year I’m buying some gear that will make hunkering down at home easier if some of the utilities or other comforts of home aren’t available… things like, ahem, a Tote-able Toilet, Double Doodie Bags, and packets of enzymes (it’s just reality). Because I’m a wimp when it comes to being cold, a Mr. Heater is in my future, in case the gas and/or power goes out in the winter. I also really love to cook, so I’ve got my eye on a Kitchen Plus 2000 for food processing without electricity and, if I can swing it, a Bosch. Because…who doesn’t want a Bosch? It’s the Rolls Royce of food processing, if you have power.

    Angela

    A couple of summers ago, I went to church with my mom and the speakers talked about the importance of communication in an emergency. One of the speakers learned how to use a HAM radio and was part of the local HAM radio network. He gave a brief overview of how the HAM system works.

    For my New Year’s resolution for indoor gear, I’d like to study up on HAM radios and I’d also like to research and buy different phone apps and radios like the Kaito Voyager that can get access to NOAA and other weather/warning update systems that will help me to stay in communication and know what’s going on during an emergency if I have to shelter in place.

     

    Kim

    This year, my husband and I will be condensing all of our “stuff”, especially in the kitchen. In 2014, I plan to purchase a Bosch Universal Plus Mixer with Blender Attachment and Cookie Paddles  with the Metal Whip Driver. This will help us prepare for when we move into a smaller apartment when my husband goes to grad school. Bosch Mixers do practically everything. Not only can you make bread, cake, and cookies, but, with the blender attachment, you can cream smoothies, malts (my specialty!), sauces, meringues, whipped toppings, and more. With the one mixer that does it all, I can get rid of my bulky stand mixer, toss out my low-power blender, and eventually, as I add on more attachments, get rid of the other bulky items that take up space in my kitchen.

     

    What types of indoor gear items do you want with you if you have to shelter in place? Let us know in the comments. 

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: communication, emergency preparedness, Sanitation, emergency cooking, food stroage

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