Monthly Archives: November 2013

  • Guest Post: Kelly Kettle Customer Review

     

    Kelly Kettle combo - Stainless Steel

    A few weeks ago, we purchased a Kelly Kettle Stainless Steel Base Camp.  This purchase was made after many trips to the store to look at it, and some hours spent researching it on the internet.  We purchased the kit, which includes the kettle, pot stand, cooking set and fire starter.

    Our main purpose for the purchase was to use it for camping and hiking.  We take many day trips, and it’s perfect for heating the water for camp meals or coffee.  The first time we used it on our back patio, just to try it out.   We boiled water in about 4 minutes, which I thought was awesome, considering the fact we were using the kettle in a blocked area, with not a lot of airflow.

    After using it just once, you realize just how amazing this product is.  The great thing about it is you don’t have to carry any special type of fuel.  All you have to do is round up some sticks and twigs and you’re ready to go.  We have access to pine cones, so we use small ones.  Not only is it good fuel, but it smells great too.

    After using the Kelly Kettle, and thinking about it a bit, I realized that it has many uses other than just camping.  Earlier this summer, an auto accident caused the power to go out at our home for about 24 hours.  Now, we have electric appliances, so, making meals during this time required some creativity.  If we would have had the kettle, we could have easily made emergency meals since we keep them around for camping and hiking trips.

    When hiking, you can also get your water from a lake or stream, especially if you carry a water filter system as we do.  Not to mention you are boiling the water anyway.  This will save you from packing water around.

    Give the Kelly Kettle a try; it’s an awesome product.

     

    Jeff W, UT

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: emergency cooking, Customer Reviews, Survival, water, guest post, warmth

  • Have Yourself a Merry Little Road Trip

    Take precautions when heading out on your road trip

    Want to put your Christmas plans in perspective? According to AAA’s yearly holiday travel forecast, an estimated 93.3 million Americans will travel more than 50 miles from their homes this holiday season. 90% of those trips will be by car, and 54% of those road trips (you still following the math?) will be undertaken by just one or two adults. See if you can calculate how many cars that puts on the road between December 22nd and January 1st.

    Add to those fun numbers the possibilities of nasty weather, drunk drivers, car trouble, and carsick children, and you’ve got tons of reasons to be extra prepared this December. In terms of peace of mind, a little planning can go a long way. Take these precautions, and turn your Grinch-y road trip into a jingle-all-the-way adventure.

    • Car maintenance – Before a long trip, be sure everything’s working properly on the car and check fluid levels. And a quick wash might seem counterintuitive before a snowy haul, but clean headlights will help you see in dark or stormy weather (and help others see you). 
    •  

    • Route plan – Know where you’re going and which route you’re going to take. Share your route plan with a friend or family member, and let them know when you expect to arrive. Mostly importantly, stick to your route, insofar as weather and traffic allow, and don’t take shortcuts or change your plans without telling anybody!
    •  

    • Emergency pack – Aside from the typical travel luggage, be sure you make room in your car for a substantial emergency pack. Consider the possibility of being stranded in your car, and keep enough of the right things on hand to sustain everyone in the car—especially food, water, blankets, medications, and a first aid kit. A phone charger is an absolute must. And don’t forget car maintenance items, like jumper cables, snow chains, roadside assistance numbers, and a headlamp (ever tried changing a tire in the dark?).
    •  

    • Weather – Plan around bad weather. Check the forecast well before your trip, and build extra hours into your travel plan to accommodate unexpected bumps. Ideally, allowing a window of a few days when making travel plans can help you avoid dangerous storms.
    •  

    • Fatigue – Drowsy driving puts everyone in your car at risk, even if you don’t actually fall asleep. A sleepy driver’s reaction time slows down and their awareness of their surroundings decreases. Beat the odds by taking a lot of breaks, staying hydrated, and singing Christmas carols at the top of your lungs.

    And, for a bonus round, here are three quick tips for air travel:

    • Delays – Basically, plan on them. Carry on as much as possible, in case you can’t get to your luggage for a while. Keep things like meds, toiletries, a change of clothes, snacks, and cash handy.
    •  

    • Communication – Keep friends or family informed of delays, canceled or missed flights, or changes in your plan. Again, a phone charger will be a life-saver.
    •  

    • Kids – The two biggest travel-meltdown inducers are hunger and boredom. Stave off tantrums by packing high-protein snacks and an assortment of books, small toys, or games. These Airplane Travel Games for Kids and these 50 Ways to Keep your Toddler Busy are genius.) 

     

    Vacations, road trips, and all sorts of other activities make this holiday season a magical time of year. Drive smart on the roads and factor a few extra hours into your travel plans to get to your destination safely this season!

     

    Sources

    http://newsroom.aaa.com/tag/aaa-travel-services/

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: drive, road trip, winter preparedness, emergency preparedness, preparedness, Winter

  • How to Winterize your Home

    |1 COMMENT(S)

    Winterize your house before the storms hit

    The minute winter is over and the temperature creeps up above 40 degrees, I know exactly what I’m supposed to do. Spring cleaning? Bring it on. Paint touch-ups? Love it. Garden prep? Couldn’t start soon enough. But somehow I’m never as enthusiastic about my preparations for winter. Maybe it’s because I’m too wrapped up in Jingle Bells to think about the important, practical things (like my house making it through the stormy season). So this year, I’m mending my ways. Amid all my plans for caroling and drinking eggnog, I hereby commit to winterize my home. You all heard me, right? Somebody’s got to hold me to it…

    If you’re in a similar situation, there are plenty of places to look for good tips and checklists. I’ve listed some of the best at the end of the post, but most of the advice shakes down into these three basic categories:

    1. Energy efficiency

    In most parts of the country, winter is the season of skyrocketing utility bills, as we pay to heat our rooms, our water, and our toes. Reduce costs by checking the basics first: open heat vents, make sure your insulation is up to snuff, and check doors and windows for heat leaks—a little caulking or a weather strip is far cheaper than the fuel it takes to raise your home’s temperature those few, critical degrees! Another clever trick I found is to reverse the direction of your ceiling fans, if you have them, pushing the heated air downward and keeping the room warmer.

    2. Seasonal use items

    Winter means putting certain things away and pulling out others that haven’t seen the light of day in nine months. Make sure the former are stored properly and the latter are in good repair for winter use. For example, drain lawnmowers and weed-eaters of gasoline to keep the engines from gumming up in the cold. Remove window-unit air conditioners, or winterize central AC units by draining water pipes and covering the unit with plastic.

    Before the weather turns really nasty, have the chimney cleaned and/or the furnace serviced. Stock up on your supply of firewood or pellets, if you use a traditional fireplace or wood stove. And make sure snow shovels, ice scrapers, and snow blowers are all functional and accessible.

    3. Storm and cold prep

    Winter weather can be pretty brutal on your home and property. You can’t anticipate everything, but you can prepare. Here are some common problems and troubleshooting tips.

    Heavy rain or snow – Clean gutters and unclog downspouts. Gutters weighty with debris and water can pull away from the siding or (worse) leak into the house. Similarly, replace worn shingles on the roof before you have to fix a leak.

    Ice – Drain sprinklers and hoses, insulate outdoor faucets, and turn off the outdoor water supply to prevent frozen or cracked exterior pipes. Keep sand, salt, or ice melt on hand to keep porch steps and walkways safe in freezing temperatures.

    Wind – Check trees close to your house for rot or overhanging branches that could come off in a windstorm (or heavy snow). Cover and store patio furniture and stash pots and planters in the shed or garage.

    Most of all, don’t forget your emergency kits! Double check your supply of candles and blankets, in case of power outages, or invest in a Yeti Solar Generator to keep the basics powered in case of a blackout. Make sure you have the needed supplies to help you weather any storm.

    Don't forget to Winterize your Car too! Check out these links for handy checklists, and stay safe and warm this winter!

    http://www.realestate.com/advice/a-checklist-for-winterizing-and-weatherproofing-your-home-66175/
    http://www.isciencetimes.com/articles/3899/20121015/winterizing-home-60-tip-checklist-saving-energy.htm
    http://www.bobvila.com/articles/502-winter-preparation-checklist/
    http://www.doityourself.com/stry/winter-home-checklist#b
    http://www.artofmanliness.com/2010/11/09/15-ways-to-winterize-your-home/

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: house, winterize, emergency preparedness, family, preparedness, Winter, skills

  1. 4-6 of 31 items