Why Ice Fishing Could Save Your Life

February 13, 2014

Why Ice Fishing Could Save Your Life

Compared to hundreds of years ago, ice fishing in the 21st century is more of a competitive sport, pastime, or hobby than a means of survival. Today, anglers come to the ice riding ATVs equipped with electric augers (a tool to drill holes in the ice) and sonar systems to identify approaching fish.

So is ice fishing a practical survival skill to learn if you don’t have all the gadgets? Is it even worth it?

According to Survivalist magazine, winter survival diets thrive on protein and meat to give you the energy and strength to survive in the cold. If you don’t feel confident hunting, and if edible plants are hard to come by, fish may become a crucial source of protein.

But how do you ice fish? What do you need? What should you know?

First: Gather your Supplies

Let’s say you have to evacuate your home in winter and all you have is your emergency kit. These items in your kit could help you ice fish:

  • An Axe—to cut a hole in the ice
  • A Shovel—to skim slush and ice chunks out of the hole (some recommend even using a rice skimmer or ladle to do this)
  • Emergency Rope—to create a set-line or to tie around yourself and have others hold the end while you check the thickness of the ice (safety precaution)
  • Paracord—for fishing line
  • Pliers and Cutting Tools
  • SOL Origin Survival Pack—includes a mini fishing kit
  • Tape measure—to measure thickness of ice
  • Bait—you can find worms and other bugs in hollow logs. You can also use small pieces of meat, if you can spare it, or smaller fish. You could even make a jig (a decorated weight that looks like a fish that you move around in the water)
  • Fishing Hooks—Sense of Survival suggests to use different sized hooks that you can make from sticks, bones, and other naturally growing fibers.
  • Powerbait—a neon colored play-doh-like bait.

The list above gives you some last minute options to use if you decide you need to ice fish for survival and don’t have the tools. But if you’re planning on ice fishing as a method of survival and want to have your emergency kit packed, consider purchasing more specialized equipment. The following supplies will help you to ice fish using basic supplies that you can carry with you in an emergency.

  • Auger—there are both hand powered and electric augers to drill holes in the ice
  • Ice Chisel/Pick—used to clear out slush from hole
  • Fishing Pole

-          Tip-UP Pole- can be made with wood or plastic. It has a long stick with a reel and trigger device. A flag is placed at the top of the stick using a spring. When a fish bites, the flag will bounce up and down (kind of like a bobber).

-          Jigging Rod— a two foot pole that looks like your smaller, traditional fishing pole. You bounce the jigging rod up and down every few seconds to get the fish attention. Can be used with a jig.

  • Bucket or Chair—so you can sit comfortably on the ice

Second: Test the Ice

  • Four inches is a safe ice thickness for ice fishing (five inches is safe for an ATV or snowmobile, 8-12 inches is safe for a car or small truck)
  • Survey the ice before stepping out on to it. Are there cracks or breaks? Flowing water near the edges of the ice? Has water thawed and refrozen? Is there white ice? These are signs the ice is weak.
  • Test the ice thickness by using your ice chisel, axe, or other sharp object to break the ice and make a small hole. Then measure the ice thickness with a tape measure.
  • Just because your ice is four inches in one spot on the lake, doesn’t mean that the whole ice surface is four inches or safe to go out on. Ice may be two inches thick and unsafe only 150 feet away from you.

CAUTION: Be careful on the ice. Slipping and breaking a bone during a survival situation is far from ideal. And be careful of exposure—the reflection of the sun on ice or snow could cause sunburns, and [hypothermia] is always a risk in winter weather. Make sure to dress in layers that you can take off if you get too hot.

Third: Make a Hole

When making your hole, make sure it is 6 to 8 inches in diameter (this is where your tape measurer comes in) and no more than 12 inches across. If the hole is larger than this, you may put yourself or someone else at risk of falling in.

Use your axe or ice chisel to chip away at the ice to make a hole. Make sure you make sure you have a strap or something to tie the axe handle or ice chisel to your wrist so you don’t lose it in the water when cutting the hole.

Fourth: Fish!

According to Survivalist, the goal of survival ice fishing is to collect more energy in the food you catch than you expend to get it. In a survival situation, you’ll need energy to help yourself or your family to survive.

The best way to increase your chances and to save your energy is to have a number of hooks in the water at once. You can use set-lines (lines with multiple hooks on them) that you can leave unattended and come back to later. Having multiple hooks out in the water can increase your chances of catching a fish.

To learn how to make a set-line, check out the iceshanty.com article, [“Scientific set-lining for more Pike”]

If the set line’s not working for you, you can construct a rod and reel system and use jigging or bait or try your hand at spear fishing (but you need really good aim . . .) for survival situations.

Have you ever gone ice fishing without technology? Do you think it would be worth it to ice fish in a survival situation?

 

Sources

http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/safety/ice/thickness.html

http://www.worldfishingnetwork.com/tips/post/ice-fishing

Survivalist, Issue 14: Jan/Feb 2014

http://adventure.howstuffworks.com/outdoor-activities/snow-sports/ice-fishing2.htm

http://www.wikihow.com/Know-When-Ice-is-Safe

 


This post was posted in Uncategorized and was tagged with skills, emergency kit, emergency preparedness, emergency preparedness supplies

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