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  • Liberals are Preparing for the Trumpocalypse (What are You Preparing for?)

    Trumpocalypse

    Throughout the years, plenty of Americans have always worked hard to be prepared for whatever emergency may arise. As time went on, more people joined in the prepping fun. Many of these people prepared out of fear for the future under their current political leaders. Others prepared because they didn’t know what the future held, and just wanted to be prepared for anything, including political, natural, and other disasters.

    In fact, it was estimated that at one time “there were 3 million preppers in the United States,” according to an article on The Economic Collapse. Now, however, that number has fallen to an all-time low. Speculation as to why this is ranges from a lack of catastrophic natural disasters to the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States. Many people feel good about the future, finding safety in the man they elected.

    Others, however, don’t feel the same.

    While Donald Trump has eased the fears of many, countless others believe the same man will bring economic and other hardships upon them (aka the Trumpocalypse). With these thoughts in mind, more and more U.S. Liberals are preparing with food, water, gear, and guns. In the last eight years, those aligned more towards the right were the in the majority when it came to prepping. Now, many left-wingers are joining the prepping fun, while the right-winged preppers are dwindling in number.

    Trumpocalypse Many disasters happen so unexpectedly that if you're not ready prepared, the time has already passed.

    Is it good that more people are preparing? Of course! Is it also good that many are no longer afraid for the future? Indeed it is. However, to sacrifice preparedness simply because of a more stable future is folly. Whether Donald Trump will make the economy better or not is still yet to be seen. So it is with natural disasters. Nobody knows when the next hurricane, earthquake, or tornado will come through. Water mains might break and power may go out for an extended amount of time. Donald trump has no control over such things. But you have control over how you will live when those events happen.

    There are fears amid liberals, among others, that Donald Trump has mobilized hate crimes and other deplorable activities. According to the BBC, this is why many supporters of Hillary Clinton are buying firearms and taking to the gun range. Personal safety is a concern, and one of the ways to feel safer is to become proficient with guns and be prepared for an uncertain future.

    In the past, the majority of those preparing with food storage, water, and gear have been those associated with the right-wing. Now, however, preppers on the left are increasing in number. Regardless of your political viewpoint, the value of preparedness is the same. The effects of what happens tomorrow and in the near and distant future can be mitigated by the way you prepare today.

    Natural disasters are all too common to ignore. Financial crises can come without warning. Job loss, accident, and other personal emergencies are unpredictable. But when you’re prepared for anything, the negative aspects of those emergencies and disasters can be lessened, and your life can continue on just as seamlessly as before the disaster happened.

    In the end, it doesn't matter if you prepare for a Trump administration, natural disasters, or even zombies. The fact is, being prepared for one event will prepare you for another.

     

    Disaster_Blog_Banner Trumpocalypse

  • Drought Buster: Atmospheric Rivers Bring Drought Relief - and Disaster - to California

    Look at these two pictures from the United States Drought Monitor. This first is from a year ago. The entire state was in some level of drought, and almost half was in the highest level (exceptional drought – rust colored).

     

    California Drought 2016 atmospheric river California Drought as of January 12, 2016
    California Drought 2017 atmospheric river California Drought as of January 10, 2017

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Compare this year’s map. Everywhere north of Sacramento is drought-free. Only 2 percent of the state is in exceptional drought.  Since January 1, Lake Tahoe’s water level has risen almost a foot – 33.6 billion gallons, according to the National Weather Service.

    The January storms that brought this remarkable turnaround also wreaked havoc. They:

    Caused at least five deaths.

    atmospheric river Pioneer Cabin Tree toppled in storm - image via Mercury News

    Toppled the "Pioneer Cabin" tree in Calaveras Big Trees State Park, Calif. The still-living giant sequoia had a tunnel, cut in the 1880s, that tourists could walk through.

    Caused the Truckee River to overflow its banks, flooding Reno, Nev. suburbs and polluting drinking water in Storey County, Nev.

    Closed ski resorts in California, Nevada, and Colorado when too much snow created hazardous driving and avalanche conditions.

    Dumped 35 inches of rain on California’s central coast. San Francisco has already seen more precipitation in 2017 than it did in all of 2013.

    Caused blizzard wind measuring 174 mph at Squaw Valley in the Sierra Nevada mountains on Jan. 8.

    Forced evacuation of several northern California towns because of flooding.

    Forced managers of the Yuba River to manually open a dam’s floodgates for the first time in 10 years to prevent flooding in downtown Sacramento.

    All of these events are is the product of a common weather phenomenon that drives between a third and a half of the precipitation in the western United States: atmospheric rivers.

    Imagine a high-altitude fire hose. It’s not constant, but once it forms, it can stretch thousands of miles long (and tens to hundreds of miles wide). It can carry water vapor equivalent to 15 times the flow at the mouth of the Mississippi River, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

    As this flow interacts with a low-pressure storm system or runs into a mountain range, it brings a blast of precipitation that can last for days. Frequently, these systems follow each other.

    One NOAA author called atmospheric rivers “drought busters,” because just a few such storms can break up droughts.

    So this year’s series of atmospheric rivers have been a great boon to bone-dry California. Yet they haven’t brought as much rain to the southern part of the state. And they bring devastating flooding.

    In 1861, rain started falling on Sacramento, Calif., on Christmas day, and stopped 43 days later, according to a story from a NBC Bay Area affiliate. The state legislature had to move for six months because the city was submerged under 10 feet of water. California’s Central Valley – its bread basket – flooded, and the San Francisco Bay filled with so much fresh rainwater that its wildlife struggled, according to the story.

    It was an extreme version of the most common atmospheric river to affect the western United States: the Pineapple Express (no relation to the movie), nicknamed such because it often forms in the Pacific near Hawaii.

    Another atmospheric river storm that began December 29, 1996, dumped more than two feet of water in many northern California locations, killed two people and caused $1.6 billion in damages.

    They’re not just confined to the west. An atmospheric river was behind massive flooding in March 2016 in Louisiana, Texas, and Oklahoma.

    And two more are forecast to hit California this week.

    Atmospheric rivers can bring all kinds of wild weather. So look around, think about what one might do to your area, and plan accordingly.

     

    Disaster_Blog_Banner Atmospheric River

  • Is Prepping on the Decline?

    Stock Market statistics Decline

    There was a time when being prepared for emergencies was a national past time. The Great Depression all but forced people to live within (and less than) their means, and save everything they could. Following the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, even more people saw the benefits of preparing and began building up supplies. Then there was the stock market crash of 2008, forcing countless Americans to live off what they had. Some had stored up enough with which to subsist until a new job or other means could be found. Many others struggled.

    Then the world was supposed to end in 2012 as predicted by the Mayans. Before the predicted date arrived, more and more people began stockpiling food, water, and gear…just in case. The world still stands, but that didn’t stop countless others from investing even more in emergency prep in the months before the 2015 blood moon tetrad.

    Preppers kept on prepping since then. That is, right up until election day. According to some sources, prepping is on a decline as people let their guard down with Donald Trump about to become president. They trust him to boost the economy, to produce jobs, and make everything awesome. Whether that will happen or not has yet to be seen (fingers crossed). But even if he does make everything awesome, that doesn’t mean we’re done prepping.

    Natural disasters don’t really care how good our economy is. Massive earthquakes, super tornadoes, category 5 hurricanes, and the biggest, baddest snowstorms can be debilitating. Even smaller disasters can leave you without power, water, and other comforts for an extended period of time.

    Family Dinner Decline

    Stocking up for the unexpected is more than just preparing for the stock market to crash (although also important). True, the Dow Jones has never been higher, and the market is looking good. So money might not be as big an issue as it has been in the past. But what about water storage, just in case your water get shut off? Broken water mains and other issues can do that without warning. Will your food storage be enough to see you through a hurricane if you can’t make it to the store? Or what about a way to warm yourself (and your family) when your power goes out during a blizzard? Or will you have sufficient food in your storage to get you by following a job loss until you can get yourself back on your feet? The list goes on.

    There are so many reasons why being prepared is a good idea. Don’t leave your safety and well-being up to fate. Just like any good ship, make sure you have a life boat. Nobody goes out expecting their ship to sink (Titanic, anyone?), but if your good fortunes do spring a leak, make your you have a lifeboat handy.

     

    Disaster_Blog_Banner Decline

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